Search found 166 matches

by Sunken
Thu 05.31.2007 2:51 am
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: でいてくれます
Replies: 4
Views: 1453

RE: でいてくれます

I can't really answer the first one; certainly, it seems weird when translated directly into English, but one need keep in mind that the connection between parts of speech can be more fuzzy in Japanese. If it had been は instead of が one could perhaps interpret it like this: "As for Nishino, I wish [...
by Sunken
Thu 05.31.2007 2:42 am
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: Is my translation correct?
Replies: 17
Views: 2954

RE: Is my translation correct?

The same thing without the kanji.
by Sunken
Mon 05.28.2007 4:07 am
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: 残して死ぬ
Replies: 8
Views: 1568

RE: 残して死ぬ

4人 means 4 persons. Remember, you need a counter to go with numbers in Japanese. So 4人の子 simply means four children.
by Sunken
Sun 05.27.2007 5:05 am
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: Translating Passive sentence
Replies: 33
Views: 8463

RE: Translating Passive sentence

犬に死なれて旅行に行けなくなった。 In this sentence, listeners may feel the speaker was annoyed with his dog's death rather than he was sad. Sounds pretty much like the expression "...because my dog died on me" in English. How far can you take that similarity? I guess at least as far as "my car broke down on me" or...
by Sunken
Sun 05.27.2007 4:46 am
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: しとけ
Replies: 6
Views: 2139

RE: しとけ

That's the way I think about it. Remember, 明日にして doesn't mean "do it tomorrow" here, it means "make it tomorrow" - as in "make that twenty minutes". So 明日にしておく means something like "better make it tomorrow so there's enough time" (or some other desireable condition)
by Sunken
Thu 05.24.2007 3:29 am
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: Sakubun no shitsumon
Replies: 8
Views: 1567

RE: Sakubun no shitsumon

Yudan Taiteki wrote:It would be like saying in English "My delicious is cake".
LOL! :D
That was spot-on!
by Sunken
Wed 05.16.2007 4:39 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: 絶対,ぜひ,きっと,必ず and more
Replies: 5
Views: 4606

RE: 絶対,ぜひ,きっと,必ず and more

Can't help but chip in my two cents' worth: ぜひ is basically "by all means", I think; i.e. used when giving permission or the like (like Yudan said) きっと is typically used when expressing optimism of the probability of something good happening (sometimes exaggerating the likelihood in order to reassur...
by Sunken
Wed 05.16.2007 4:29 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: compound sentence experiments
Replies: 11
Views: 1718

RE: compound sentence experiments

Both のに and ために can be used to express purpose. I do not have the native speaker intuition to know the difference. Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't の tend to imply a fact? That is, when you use の you imply that the purpose has actually been fulfilled? That's an impression I've got, at least, bo...
by Sunken
Sun 05.13.2007 10:22 am
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: A 〜ていく and 〜てくる question
Replies: 3
Views: 1182

RE: A 〜ていく and 〜てくる question

I'll try my hand at this! 〜て行く means something like "will grow ~ going forward" or "is growing ~" この辺りの住宅事情はこれからもどんどん大変になっていくだろう。"The housing situtation around here will probably grow steadily worse" 〜て来る correspondingly means "has grown ~", "has come to be ~". I think it's mostly used in the past t...
by Sunken
Sun 05.13.2007 7:15 am
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: 'don't be' ?
Replies: 12
Views: 2158

RE: 'don't be' ?

Well, of course, but that doesn't make it any easier for adjectives does it? You can't just go 恥ずかしくないでください after all.
by Sunken
Sun 05.13.2007 6:59 am
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: 'don't be' ?
Replies: 12
Views: 2158

RE: 'don't be' ?

I'm no native, but all these attempts seem somewhat contrived... I have a feeling Japanese speakers would tend to use other expressions rather than making imperatives out of adjectives.
泣くな
怯えるな
照れるな
by Sunken
Sun 05.13.2007 6:46 am
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: You had better help me!
Replies: 22
Views: 5915

RE: You had better help me!

Can you exchange the いい in 〜方がいい with something more explicit implying the penalty for refusing, such as 〜方が健康 or something similar, or am I thinking too literally?
by Sunken
Sun 05.13.2007 6:38 am
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: Understanding 先
Replies: 3
Views: 870

RE: Understanding 先

The core meaning remains "before, in front". It's just that when it is used to describe the time domain, it is interpreted in an unexpected direction: これから先10年間: From now on, the 10 years that are before us 先々: Far, far ahead (of us) まだ先がある: There are still things ahead (of you) 先がどうなるかわからない: We don...
by Sunken
Sun 05.06.2007 12:23 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: 達?
Replies: 16
Views: 2480

RE: 達?

Since it's determinate - a translation would include a "the": "the people in the building" - it's already introduced AFAICS.
You couldn't use 人達 to mean "a number of people", that is in indeterminate form. Or so I believe.
by Sunken
Sun 05.06.2007 7:21 am
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: 達?
Replies: 16
Views: 2480

RE: 達?

I get the feeling (correct me if I'm wrong) that 達 is only used with known entities. So you can't use it to introduce plural. Even if you personify your fish, 魚達がいます means "(all) the fishes are there", i.e. fish that are already introduced in the discourse. If you want to introduce a plurality of fi...