Search found 78 matches

by paulrowe
Sat 07.14.2007 8:35 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: 安ければ
Replies: 7
Views: 1698

RE: 安ければ

katsunori wrote: Yes. The last part of the sentence is very important for Japanese. (We can change the meaning of the sentence while talking.) Essentially, what you were changing in the English was when the decision is made. You then had to modify the tense of the other phrase to match. Present ten...
by paulrowe
Sun 07.01.2007 12:27 am
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: Advanced Writing concepts.
Replies: 39
Views: 14328

RE: Advanced Writing concepts.

A lot of people use words which, in the given context, are meaningless. Some of this is rhetoric. Some of this is filler (i.e. sounds a lot better than, "uh...", "eh...", "um..."). Some of this is the speaker trying to write something that says nothing. It seems increasingly popular for someone to w...
by paulrowe
Sat 06.30.2007 11:51 pm
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: English pet peeves
Replies: 431
Views: 118359

RE: English pet peeves

[Edit] Yudan Taiteki wrote: I have another pet peeve -- "Aren't I?" This may seem like an odd choice, but it's an example of elitist prescriptivism taken to an absurd (and ungrammatical) extreme. ... I don't think this will change. Check this out: In Latin, esse means "to be". It was historically co...
by paulrowe
Sat 06.30.2007 11:26 pm
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: "2 hours away" & "I am looking forward . . "
Replies: 13
Views: 1963

RE: "2 hours away" & "I am looking forward . . "

katafei wrote: This I know (I'm not that much of a beginner ;)). I was wondering if you can/should use polite forms with あなた? My understanding says, "You use あなた only if you don't know who you're talking to." Japanese doesn't use pronouns as extensively as English. Third-person referral to oneself ...
by paulrowe
Sat 06.30.2007 11:13 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: usage question
Replies: 13
Views: 2324

RE: usage question

x1337magex wrote: Yes, いま きょうとに いっています。 is an exact version of what is in the book. Maybe they were trying to make a point or something? The 〜ています or 〜ている formation is the Japanese progressive. In English, this is, "I am going to Kyouto (right now)." It indicates the continuity of the action. Were ...
by paulrowe
Thu 06.28.2007 1:53 am
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: English pet peeves
Replies: 431
Views: 118359

RE: English pet peeves

I am personally impressed when a non-native speaker has studied the language well enough to converse comfortably in English. I find it frustrating that more and more places are requiring you to be bilingual (even if you're native) because of the rising number of people that don't speak English.
by paulrowe
Fri 06.22.2007 7:00 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions and Problems
Topic: problem with particles...
Replies: 57
Views: 7776

RE: problem with particles...

The most helpful item for me with regard to this (and it was recommended by my sensei and one of her friends in Japan) was A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar , by Seiichi Makino and Michio Tsutsui. This book covers the particles extensively, with examples of their uses and comparisons between wh...
by paulrowe
Fri 06.22.2007 1:12 pm
Forum: Japanese General Discussion
Topic: Teen japan fans
Replies: 179
Views: 35857

RE: Teen japan fans

Infidel wrote: Unfortuantly, since I put my name in my posts, My family tracked me down to this site and private messaged me last week. I haven't talked to them in 10 years, others even longer.. Ah... Internet: The Wild West of the Modern Era, where nobody knows your name. I'm one of those that wan...
by paulrowe
Fri 06.22.2007 12:55 pm
Forum: Translation Questions or Discussion
Topic: Using adjectives and verbs together as modifier
Replies: 22
Views: 4741

RE: Using adjectives and verbs together as modifier

draglung wrote: In that case how do you convey the different meaning intended if both の and で gives the same meaning? Let me see if I can clarify this... ピンの中の甘くてぴかぴか光る虹 The sweet, sparkling rainbow inside the bottle ( lit. "the sweet, sparkling rainbow of the inside of the bottle", indicating some...
by paulrowe
Fri 06.22.2007 10:57 am
Forum: 日本語の練習 (Practice Japanese)
Topic: Shiritori 〜2〜
Replies: 2044
Views: 536441

RE: Shiritori 〜2〜

katafei wrote:
謙虚
けんきょ
modesty
きょろきょろ (と見る)
look around restlessly
by paulrowe
Fri 06.22.2007 10:48 am
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: English pet peeves
Replies: 431
Views: 118359

RE: English pet peeves

Yudan Taiteki wrote: Being a linguist has nothing to do with using "proper" English -- in fact, a linguist would generally care *less* about "proper" English than a non-linguist, just because of how opposed prescriptive grammar is to most of linguistic theory. My father was an English teacher and w...
by paulrowe
Thu 06.21.2007 5:36 pm
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: English pet peeves
Replies: 431
Views: 118359

RE: English pet peeves

Yudan Taiteki wrote: Sometimes you have to say it because "He and I" is a lot less ambiguous than "we". ご弁護ありがとうございます! :D I was trying to kill two birds with one stone in those sentences, by using both third-person and first-person pronouns in both positions (without worrying about the genitive or ...
by paulrowe
Thu 06.21.2007 5:17 pm
Forum: Japanese General Discussion
Topic: Iwo Jima name change
Replies: 8
Views: 2274

RE: Iwo Jima name change

CajunCoder wrote:
Not much information in it, but according to AJBryant, 硫黄島 was originally written いわうとう.
I remember reading that it was いをうとう. Was it いわうとう -> (あう->おう) いをうとう -> (を->お) いおうとう?
by paulrowe
Thu 06.21.2007 1:17 pm
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: English pet peeves
Replies: 431
Views: 118359

RE: English pet peeves

SaverS wrote: Okay this may be the grammatical way, but seeing "My friend and I" it bothers me a little, and my one teacher told me to pronounce "often" without the "t", so when i hear people say "often" with the "t", that bothers me too. The grammar depends on the placement. My teachers always tau...
by paulrowe
Wed 06.20.2007 2:07 pm
Forum: 英語の練習
Topic: English pet peeves
Replies: 431
Views: 118359

RE: English pet peeves

Yudan Taiteki wrote: I may have been wrong in saying that it was a victim of the prescriptive grammar movements of the 18th and 19th centuries. Although, Baugh in _History of the English Language_ says "There has been some schoolmastering of the language. The substitution of you were for you was in...