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A wee practise for me

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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Infidel » Thu 07.06.2006 12:38 am

AJBryant wrote:
That's true Tony, you don't own the sensei and his existance isn't in question, just that there isn't one available so the nuance is perfectly acceptible and not really picky if you ask me..


True. But if I didn't have a teacher at all, I'd say 先生がない. Otherwise, it COULD sound like I have one, but he's just not available at the moment to answer a question.

Tony


just because we happened to address this in a similar threadon about.

4) これが わかりません。 せんせいが ないんです

From Shin1ro san,

Why nai?

He said that using inai sounds more like that you have a teacher but that they aren't here at the moment.



That's true for the inai case, but still nai doesn't sound good. Nai has to be used for an inanimate thing (material, events, plants etc).

To differentiate the two cases, you (and Tony...oh but he isn't here...) may want to add 私には for the original question. So as a whole: 私には先生がいないんです。 Probably it would literally means "I don't have my teacher" or "I don't have a teacher for me" :-)

shin1ro
Last edited by Infidel on Thu 07.06.2006 12:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Jim » Thu 07.06.2006 11:18 pm

I'm having a bit of trouble with "this" and "that".

I need to keep reminding myself that これ is “this” and それ is “that”. Getting them mixed up is creating me a lot of confusion, for example, would it be wrong to say ..

それはたべものです

instead of

これはたべものです
(if im correct that たべもの means “food”) ?

I understand how it works in English but I'm having a hard time putting into Japanese, if that makes sense. :@

Also if I wanted to say

“[person] is not talking..” would I say..

「person」ははなしませんです….?

If so, that would mean that "masen" makes a word into a negative yeah? I noticed this with わかりません(I dont understand) and わかりました (Understood).
Last edited by Jim on Thu 07.06.2006 11:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Infidel » Thu 07.06.2006 11:47 pm

これ does not mean "this" it means "this near me"
それ does not mean "that" it means "that near you"
あれ does not mean "that" it means "that nowhere near either of us"
In Japanese you always have to keep in mind your relative physical and social position to the person you are speaking to. This affects politness levels and other things, like kore, sore, are.
それはたべものです

instead of

これはたべものです


Both your examples can be correct depending on context.
Also if I wanted to say

“[person] is not talking..” would I say..
「person」ははなしませんです


personははなしていません. First rule to remember, don't stick desu after a verb, especially a conjugated verb. To say someone "is doing x" you use the -te iru construction. Te form of verb + iru. You conjugate iru normally.

If so, that would mean that "masen" makes a word into a negative yeah?

-masen is the polite non-past negative of a verb.

ごめんなさい. 漢字も読めません. ひらがなでお願いします ありがとう
(Sorry, I don't know any Kanji, Please use hiragana when correcting me, thanks)


If you don't know any kanji then I suggest you don't use them. When you use a kanji, it is assumed you know it and it invites others to use them in a reply.
Last edited by Infidel on Thu 07.06.2006 11:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Oyaji » Thu 07.06.2006 11:47 pm

I have to laugh because just the other day my 12 year old son had a friend over. They were doing their English homework, and the friend just couldn't keep "this" and "that" straight.

The simple explanation:

これ Something near the speaker.
それ Something near the listener.
あれ Something far from both the speaker and the listener.

edit: Infidel beat me to the post. :D
Last edited by Oyaji on Thu 07.06.2006 11:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Infidel » Thu 07.06.2006 11:57 pm

heh, you answered somewhere between my 2nd and 4th edit :P
Last edited by Infidel on Thu 07.06.2006 11:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Oyaji » Fri 07.07.2006 12:02 am

Actually it looks like both our original posts were at the same time. I like your explanation better than mine, but I left it because I didn't want to delete my son and his friend. ;)
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Jim » Fri 07.07.2006 12:36 am

Ahh! I get it! Oyajis explanation cleared it up completely for me, after reading Infidels post I was still a bit confused but had an idea..

personははなしていません. First rule to remember, don't stick desu after a verb, especially a conjugated verb. To say someone "is doing x" you use the -te iru construction. Te form of verb + iru. You conjugate iru normally.

Hmm, didn't know thw first rule there, thanks, but what do you mean by -te iru construction? Can you explain this a bit more in detail? I haven't actually gotten onto reading about ending sentences and I'm only familiar with "masu", "masen" and "mashita" to be honest. This has been something I've been wanting to work on but I'm still reading into the grammar to get it nailed down.

If you don't know any kanji then I suggest you don't use them. When you use a kanji, it is assumed you know it and it invites others to use them in a reply.

Thats true. I have started using the Kanji that I know and have practised but you are right that it invites people to use kanji I probably won't know; but the way I see it is that I can learn from people using kanji a bit more than if they didn't, why expose myself to kanji later on? I wrote that signature a while back when I knew 1 or 2 kanji, I should probably update it to "please use basic kanji only" but that would be a bit vague.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Infidel » Fri 07.07.2006 12:49 am

Hmm, didn't know thw first rule there, thanks, but what do you mean by -te iru construction? Can you explain this a bit more in detail? I haven't actually gotten onto reading about ending sentences and I'm only familiar with "masu", "masen" and "mashita" to be honest. This has been something I've been wanting to work on but I'm still reading into the grammar to get it nailed down.


-te form of verb. Go to your verb chart and find the -te form, it's just another form of the verb, like -masu. The -te form is sometimes called the gerund or connective form.

iru - if you've only seen -masu verbs then the masu form of iru is imasu. Imasu is the verb for exist. When you put together a verb+te+imasu you get, "is verbing" verb+te+imasen = "is not verbing" and so on. So for the verb hanasu you put it in -te form, hanashite and add a form of iru, hanashite imasu = is speaking.
Last edited by Infidel on Fri 07.07.2006 12:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Jim » Sat 07.08.2006 12:13 pm

Hmm thank you then, I'll be reading into that soon. I remember seeing the example of hanashite as a matter of fact.

I've been looking for this phrase everywhere but can't find it. How would I say (simply) "[person] is on their way" or "[person] is coming"? I know "I am coming" roughly and "Lets go" but I cant find "[person/thing] is on their way" anywhere, not even in dictionaries or whatever so I could put it toghether myself.
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Oyaji » Sat 07.08.2006 1:15 pm

The grammar is no different.

サンタさんが来ます。"Santa will come." or "Santa is coming."

Another way to say it is 「やって来る」
サンタさんがやって来る。

If you literally want to say someone is on the way, you can say:
サンタさんはこちらへ向かっています。 (向かう = むかう) or
サンタさんは来る途中です。 (途中 = とちゅう)
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RE: A wee practise for me

Postby Nyanko » Tue 07.25.2006 12:10 am

Oyaji wrote:
これ Something near the speaker.
それ Something near the listener.
あれ Something far from both the speaker and the listener.


This is slightly related to this; in my Japanese dictionary, it says that "あの" is sometimes used to mean "the". Is this common? I haven't heard this use like this before.
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