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just a little practice

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just a little practice

Postby tamii » Mon 10.09.2006 7:01 pm

Hey again everyone,

This isn't really important, but I wanted to try "randomly thinking" in Japanese, just to see if I constructed the sentences properly. I'm working on the particles, which we all know are "oh so annoying", so please correct these simple sentences if they are wrong.

You can make suggestions too if feel like it.

Thanks!

(sorry I dont have the hiragana, my input thing wasn't working)


[Sono ga neko wa totemo kawaii yo desu
That cat is very cute!
As for that cat, very cute!]

[Atashi wa chotto nemui deshita
I was a little sleepy
As for me, a little sleepy was]

[Atashi no tomodachi Marissa wa sono ni o ikimashou desu
My friend Marissa will probably go to that (concert, or what ever place it is)
As for my friend Marissa, to that go probably is]

[Ato bokura wa nanika ga shimashou
Later we (men) will probably do something
Later, as for us, something we (men) will probably do]

[Anata wa ame ka yuki ga suki desu ka
Do you like rain or snow?
As for you, rain or snow like?]

[Watashi wa kanojo o ga shimasu atashi wa mimasu
I will see that she does it.
As for me, her to do it, I will see.]
*this was an awkward sentence for me because of the particles*

[Atashi wa ongaku ga hakimashita desu
I wrote down the music.
As for me, I wrote down the music]

[Ima watashi wa genki ja nai kara atashi no haha warui desu
Right now I am not happy because my mother bad.
Now, as for me, happy not because my mother bad is.
*I didn't know how to say mad, but I guess bad works (lol)*]

[Ima watashi wa sono (some kind of place) ga e ikitai yo
I want to go to that right now!
Now, as for me, that I want to go to!]

Thanks alot... sorry there were so many. :)
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RE: just a little practice

Postby CajunCoder » Mon 10.09.2006 9:06 pm

Particles annoying? They're one of my favorite aspects of Japanese!

Hmm... Well, I think you're a bit confused on -where- to place particles. In Japanese, particles always come -after- the word they refer to. Also, usually you do not stack up more than one particle (for example, you dont say ni ga, wo ni, and certainly not ni e / ha ga/ etc.) - though, there are a few combinations, such as のが、のは、もの、には etc.


"Sono ga neko wa totemo kawaii yo desu"

There is no need for が there (in fact, I am rather confused why you put it there?) Also, よ usually goes at the end of the sentence, or at least, statement - so it should be after です.


"Atashi wa ongaku ga hakimashita desu"

Um, that translates to "As for me, Music is what I threw up is"
I believe you meant to write あたし は おんがく を かきました (I wrote music)? Or, if you wanted to state that you wrote the music, as opposed to anyone else, it would be "わたし おんがく を かきました"
Note - you don't put です after a verb.


”Anata wa ame ka yuki ga suki desu ka”

This isn't incorrect grammatically, but I think a better way of saying it would be: "あめ と ゆき では、 どちら が すき です か?" (Literally, "Among rain and snow, which is the one [that you] like?


"Atashi no tomodachi Marissa wa sono ni o ikimashou desu"

に and を should not be used together like that, and です should be omitted.
Also note that the words "that" and "this" are used in two different ways both in english and Japanese.
1st - As a noun - for example, "hand me that" [それをわたしてください]. In Japanese, それ is used for this.
2nd - Used to specify something - "hand me that box" [そのはこをわたしてください]. This is when "その" is used.
The same is true with これ and あれ, which become この and あの.


"Watashi wa kanojo o ga shimasu atashi wa mimasu"

This sentence is completely incomprehensible. You cannot expect to translate something, using english wording, directly into Japanese.
This would be said ”かのじょ に させる。”


”Ato bokura wa nanika ga shimashou”

This is odd, because "ga" places emphasis on the previous word. You're stating something like, "Lets do something (not just anything, but that "something!"".
A more natural way to say this would just, to omit that "ga" all together.
あとで なにか (を) しましょう。


”Ima watashi wa genki ja nai kara atashi no haha warui desu”

This translates to "Now, because I am not well, my mother is bad"
Your use of "kara" is, again, backwards. Remember, Japanese particles come -after- what they refer to. If you want to say "because mom is bad" it would be "haha ga warui kara,"


”Ima watashi wa sono (some kind of place) ga e ikitai yo”

Do not use "ga e" together - it doesn't make sense. This sentence would most likely be understood "Now I want to go to "that ga"".
Also, using そこ for "there" rather than "それ" would be better - unless you were trying to specify "that place" in which case it would be "sono basho"


Are you learning on your own? And if so, from where?
Last edited by CajunCoder on Mon 10.09.2006 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: just a little practice

Postby mjmsisco » Mon 10.09.2006 9:42 pm

:D
Also in "Atashi wa chotto nemui deshita
I was a little sleepy
As for me, a little sleepy was]"
Nemui is an adjective, so it should be changed to the past tnese, without the use of desu.
And Atashi is only used by females, i dont know if you are a girl or not . lol
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RE: just a little practice

Postby tamii » Mon 10.09.2006 10:26 pm

CajunCoder wrote:
Particles annoying? They're one of my favorite aspects of Japanese!

Hmm... Well, I think you're a bit confused on -where- to place particles. In Japanese, particles always come -after- the word they refer to. Also, usually you do not stack up more than one particle (for example, you dont say ni ga, wo ni, and certainly not ni e / ha ga/ etc.) - though, there are a few combinations, such as のが、のは、もの、には etc.


"Sono ga neko wa totemo kawaii yo desu"

There is no need for が there (in fact, I am rather confused why you put it there?) Also, よ usually goes at the end of the sentence, or at least, statement - so it should be after です.


"Atashi wa ongaku ga hakimashita desu"

Um, that translates to "As for me, Music is what I threw up is"
I believe you meant to write あたし は おんがく を かきました (I wrote music)? Or, if you wanted to state that you wrote the music, as opposed to anyone else, it would be "わたし おんがく を かきました"
Note - you don't put です after a verb.


”Anata wa ame ka yuki ga suki desu ka”

This isn't incorrect grammatically, but I think a better way of saying it would be: "あめ と ゆき では、 どちら が すき です か?" (Literally, "Among rain and snow, which is the one [that you] like?


"Atashi no tomodachi Marissa wa sono ni o ikimashou desu"

に and を should not be used together like that, and です should be omitted.
Also note that the words "that" and "this" are used in two different ways both in english and Japanese.
1st - As a noun - for example, "hand me that" [それをわたしてください]. In Japanese, それ is used for this.
2nd - Used to specify something - "hand me that box" [そのはこをわたしてください]. This is when "その" is used.
The same is true with これ and あれ, which become この and あの.


"Watashi wa kanojo o ga shimasu atashi wa mimasu"

This sentence is completely incomprehensible. You cannot expect to translate something, using english wording, directly into Japanese.
This would be said ”かのじょ に させる。”


”Ato bokura wa nanika ga shimashou”

This is odd, because "ga" places emphasis on the previous word. You're stating something like, "Lets do something (not just anything, but that "something!"".
A more natural way to say this would just, to omit that "ga" all together.
あとで なにか (を) しましょう。


”Ima watashi wa genki ja nai kara atashi no haha warui desu”

This translates to "Now, because I am not well, my mother is bad"
Your use of "kara" is, again, backwards. Remember, Japanese particles come -after- what they refer to. If you want to say "because mom is bad" it would be "haha ga warui kara,"


”Ima watashi wa sono (some kind of place) ga e ikitai yo”

Do not use "ga e" together - it doesn't make sense. This sentence would most likely be understood "Now I want to go to "that ga"".
Also, using そこ for "there" rather than "それ" would be better - unless you were trying to specify "that place" in which case it would be "sono basho"


Are you learning on your own? And if so, from where?


Whoa I really messed up on this. Anyways, thanks a lot for correcting my work.
I think the reason why I kept using ga at all the wrong times was because I thought of "ga" as kind of like "the next most important thing to wa in a sentence". I have no clue why... maybe it was just my imagination.
You'll be happy to know your correcting didn't go to waste :)
I'm using the little pointers that you gave me, and yes... im printing them out.

To answer your question at the bottom, I've been learning Japanese from a variety of webpages. I'm not going to any classes, because I'm in grade 9 and was hoping to learn Japanese in grade 10 (i'd have a head start to it). I guess cramming Japanese into your brain doesn't work to well.. I'll have to slow my pace down so I don't get into any more of these predicaments :|

Thanks a lot! B)
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RE: just a little practice

Postby CajunCoder » Tue 10.10.2006 1:36 am

tamii wrote:
Whoa I really messed up on this. Anyways, thanks a lot for correcting my work.
I think the reason why I kept using ga at all the wrong times was because I thought of "ga" as kind of like "the next most important thing to wa in a sentence". I have no clue why... maybe it was just my imagination.
You'll be happy to know your correcting didn't go to waste :)
I'm using the little pointers that you gave me, and yes... im printing them out.

To answer your question at the bottom, I've been learning Japanese from a variety of webpages. I'm not going to any classes, because I'm in grade 9 and was hoping to learn Japanese in grade 10 (i'd have a head start to it). I guess cramming Japanese into your brain doesn't work to well.. I'll have to slow my pace down so I don't get into any more of these predicaments :|

Thanks a lot! B)



Wow, reading back over my post, I wonder if I came off rather harsh sounding? Anyway, if so - I apologise as it wasn't my intent.

Hang in there! Actually, I've always taken the "Jump right in and learn everything at once" approach. I learn better by immersing myself, and doing/using things hands on, even if I don't know what I'm doing.
I also highly recommend self-study! If you do it right, you'll learn a lot more than if you relied on classes and text books to spoon-feed you. At least, that is how it is with me - people learn differently.
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RE: just a little practice

Postby tamii » Wed 10.11.2006 5:48 pm

thanks

nah, you didn't come of harsh, don't worry ;)
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RE: just a little practice

Postby Mike Cash » Thu 10.12.2006 8:58 am

tamii wrote:


To answer your question at the bottom, I've been learning Japanese from a variety of webpages. I'm not going to any classes, because I'm in grade 9 and was hoping to learn Japanese in grade 10 (i'd have a head start to it). I guess cramming Japanese into your brain doesn't work to well..


I admire your drive and determination, but I feel I must point out to you that there is a very real danger of spending a lot of time and effort "learning" stuff by yourself that you will just have to "unlearn" next year in grade 10.

I would suggest that between now and the beginning of your actual classroom studies you concentrate solely on picking up vocabulary (and perhaps the hiragana/katakana). You can practice vocabulary by just substituting the Japanese words into English sentences (in your head, of course) so that you will be very familiar with some vocabulary and be off to a running start that way.

I used to do it like this, for example:

"I have to go to the mise and kau some gyuunyuu and corn flakes for asagohan tomorrow"

(I have to go to the store and buy some milk and corn flakes for breakfast tomorrow)

Do this sort of thing a lot, and the Japanese words become so familiar to you that they're more like synonyms of English words in your mind than foreign words that you have to work to recall each time you want to use them.

It's silly as hell, but you'd be surprised how well it works. For stuff like past tense verbs...just use the Japanese plain verb and tack an English -ed on the end.
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RE: just a little practice

Postby paul_b » Thu 10.12.2006 9:04 am

tamii wrote:
To answer your question at the bottom, I've been learning Japanese from a variety of webpages. I'm not going to any classes, because I'm in grade 9 and was hoping to learn Japanese in grade 10 (i'd have a head start to it). I guess cramming Japanese into your brain doesn't work to well.. I'll have to slow my pace down so I don't get into any more of these predicaments :|

I can't really recommend webpages in general as a sole learning resource because they are highly variable in quality, often introduce concepts too fast and are sometimes just plain wrong.

I don't have anything against learning by yourself, heck that's mostly how I've been doing it, but go get textbooks / dictionaries / software. In most developed countries your local library will either have some or allow you to request them from other libraries for a nominal fee.
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RE: just a little practice

Postby Fukumori » Tue 10.17.2006 7:51 pm

すごい、ケージャン! That's quite comprehensive!

Tamii, I wanna point out a useful way to think about は(wa) and が. は is somewhat the Japanese "the". You're pretty much speaking of something that the listener(which in practice is you!) is quite familiar with.
が is often the Japanese "a". For instance, it is always used before すき(like) and きらい(dislike). Example:

おおかみがすきです。
I like wolves.

Or in other words, "I like a wolf", meaning if you saw a wolf, you would cheer up at the very sight!
But you are right in the respect that if the two particles were together in a sentence, the most important topic would be marked with は.
ぜったい森をまもって!
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RE: just a little practice

Postby flammable hippo » Tue 10.17.2006 8:12 pm

I think somebody already mentioned that ねむい had to be conjugated differently than nouns because its an adjectives but no explanation was given, so I'll do that.

In Japanese, there are two types of adjectives, this one is known as an い adjective and to conjugate it you do the following

negativeーい→くない(です) or くありません

past-い→かった(です)

past negative-い→くなかった(です)or くありませんでした。

They are in order from left to right based on politeness with the first being the most casual and the last being the most polite. There is a lot more on adjectives on one of Clay's articles. Try searching for it.

Btw, since ござる/ございます is the humble, keigo form of ある/あります、is it possible to replace the ない/ありません in a negated い adjective with ござらない/ございません? So, for example, instead of saying 長くない、could I say 長くございません?Or does that seem rather odd?
Two muffins were baking in an oven. One turns to the other and says "sure is hot in here." The other replies "AH TALKING MUFFIN!"

二つのマフィンがオーブンで焼かれていた。片方のマフィンがもう一方のマフィンに向かって、"暑いね”と言った。すると、話しかけられたほうのマフィンは"アッ!喋るマフィンだ!”と驚いた。 :)
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RE: just a little practice

Postby coco » Wed 10.18.2006 2:32 am

Btw, since ござる/ございます is the humble, keigo form of ある/あります、is it possible to replace the ない/ありません in a negated い adjective with ござらない/ございません? So, for example, instead of saying 長くない、could I say 長くございません?Or does that seem rather odd?


こちらをご覧ください。
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RE: just a little practice

Postby AJBryant » Thu 10.19.2006 12:31 am

So, for example, instead of saying 長くない、could I say 長くございません?Or does that seem rather odd?


Actually, the use of ございます requires a special sound shift for the adjectives. They all shift from the normal "ii" to "ou" (even when the kanji doesn't specifically allow such a pronunciation. For example, 長い is /nagai/ but before ございます the adjective changes to 長う and is pronounced /nagou/.

危ない ー> 危のうございます (あぶのうございます)
高い ー> 高うございます (たこうございます)
長い ー> 長うございます。(なごうございます)

For the negative of the adjective, remember; the negative is supplied by the ございません, so "not tall" is 高うございません (たこうございません).


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RE: just a little practice

Postby Harisenbon » Thu 10.19.2006 3:08 am

Actually, the use of ございます requires a special sound shift for the adjectives.


へー. I had never seen that before.
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RE: just a little practice

Postby richvh » Thu 10.19.2006 6:46 am

No? 早い→おはようございます
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RE: just a little practice

Postby hungryhotei » Thu 10.19.2006 6:51 am

I'm sure everyone knows ありがたい→ありがとうございます too.
天気がいいから、散歩しましょう。
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