Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - Eating in Japan...

Eating in Japan...

Post questions and answers about living or visiting Japan or the culture

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby richard99uk » Fri 01.27.2006 2:25 pm

I do cook, thanks; I take pride that I can cook.
Image
Image
richard99uk
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun 01.08.2006 4:36 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby Shibakoen » Fri 01.27.2006 5:47 pm

Oh boy. Don't tell me that we're going to have a debate over whether yaki means roasted or grilled. Trust us. The dictionary may say " to roast" first, but everything mentioned so far here is definitely grilled. Maybe roasted things are also -yaki stuff, but I don't think I ever ate anything roasted while I was there. Maybe roasting chestnuts or something would be chestnut-yaki, whatever, but this stuff is definitely simply grilled. Mmmm... marshmellow-yaki.... Anyway, it's just semantics. But generally if you see something-yaki or yaki-something, think "grilled." Is tako-yaki grilled or roasted? I think it's neither. They're little balls so it might be a bit of a misnomer, or they might actually be roasted. I don't know.

But, when you think yakitori, for example, just think grilled chicken. The songbird I was talking about that is drowned in alcohol is roasted whole, so maybe that would be called yakitori, too, but when you go into a yakitori, you're just going to get GRILLED chicken. Oh, try negima. I love that stuff. It's just a grilled chicken on a stick (think chicken kabab) with green onions in between the pieces of chicken. You can have it with sauce or salt, I think. I always went with the sauce. It's called "tare", right? I can't remember.

I can't believe I forgot Monja-yaki and Okonomiyaki. They say that Okonomiyaki is the "Japanese pizza", but don't buy that explanation. Definitely don't expect Pizza Hut to start carrying it. Basically you take cabage, and other vegetables and meats (I always use mochi and cheese, too), put it in a bowl with the mix (kinda like flour, it may even be flour for all I know), mix it all up then put it on the grill. Don't forget the oil, you don't want it to stick! My friends always put the fish-flakes on it, and that's ok, but definitely remember the sause. Mayo is optional. I hate mayo. Monja-yaki's just a little different. Kinda sticky. Anyway, both are good and the best part is that they're pretty cheap and it's SO easy to make.

Oh, and don't expect to find peanut-butter and jelly sandwiches on the menu. First, it's real hard to find American style peanut butter. They've got this peanut cream stuff that I wouldn't even think about puting on a sandwich. The funniest bit is the way most of my japanese students would pronounce it: "peanuts cream". Let's just say that when the first student said it, I thought he said something else that was extremely funny.

I'm telling you, though, you really won't get as much enjoyment out of Japanese food if you don't try the "unusual" stuff. Yes, unagi and anago are eel, but so what? It's like a fish. They're not that different. Besides, they're actually cooked. Other fish is best raw. I can't stand cooked tuna, and salmon's a pain to cook, but they're both incredible raw. I also don't like cooked scallops because they've got that weird taste, but when they're raw they're out of this world. Mmm... so good. Now, if it's not fresh meat, of course it's not going to be good, and it might get you sick. But so will eating a cooked hamburger if the idiot in the kitchen didn't wash his hands before he put it on the bun. Or if they don't clean the counter tops. Most of the sushi you get here in the US, in my experience, is not very fresh. But in Tokyo, the Tsukiji fish markets are right there. YUMMY!!!
Last edited by Shibakoen on Fri 01.27.2006 6:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Shibakoen
 
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon 03.28.2005 5:17 pm

RE: Go AWAY!

Postby hamsterfreak4evr » Fri 01.27.2006 6:07 pm

How do you say "go away"?:D
User avatar
hamsterfreak4evr
 
Posts: 387
Joined: Sun 07.17.2005 8:21 pm
Location: America
Native language: english
Gender: Female

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby AJBryant » Fri 01.27.2006 6:09 pm

They've got this peanut cream stuff that I wouldn't even think about puting on a sandwich. The funniest bit is the way most of my japanese students would pronounce it: "peanuts cream".


It's not bad as a PBJ if you don't mind the sugar rush. B)

As to the pronunciation -- that's because the Japanese call one of those little things piinatsu instead of piinatto.

Mmmm... marshmellow-yaki....


One of my fondest memories from Japan is teaching the local Buddhist priest's kids how to roast marshmallows. It was New Year's Eve, there was a bonfire at the temple, and we were all standing around the fire trying to stay warm, and I mentioned that I wished we had marshmallows. The priest's son said they did, and asked why. HAH! I told him to go get them, and to bring back a coat hanger. (He brought a plastic one back first... sigh.) They'd never had marshmallows like that. It was a great evening. (Yes, I checked -- no graham crackers, or I'd've introduced 'em to smores.)

Tony
User avatar
AJBryant
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5313
Joined: Sun 10.09.2005 11:29 am
Location: Indiana
Native language: English
Gender: Male

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby Shibakoen » Fri 01.27.2006 6:18 pm

hamsterfreak4evr wrote:
How do you say "go away"?:D


I think you can say, "いけ", maybe, why? "うるさい" might work. Getting hungry? Damn it, I am. Mmm... basashi...
User avatar
Shibakoen
 
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon 03.28.2005 5:17 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby Samusai » Thu 02.02.2006 1:20 pm

Why's everone so worked up on sheeps eyes and cow brains and the such? I've been DYING to try them! There are so many delicious foods out there that are wasted. How about cow tongue? It's probably the tastiest meat in the cow, since it's such a strong muscle. Eastern countries have such undeserved reputations brought about by ignorance. My friends cant even get Japan and China straight. "All them Chinese kids with their cell phones and Sony and stuff." "That's Japan." "Same thing. They both eat dog." Usually what follows is a beating and a lecture about being stupid infront of me. So anyway, I wouldn't be too afraid of eating weird stuff. And do NOT look at them like "you have a hamburger hidden around here for me right?" How would you like it if you gave someone from Japan some dish you spent an hour to cook and they gave you a look like "This is discusting. You've got some instant ramen around here right?" I'd stab them in the eye with their hashi and declair sporks rule. So yeah, be brave, TRY new food, be thankful new doors are open to you.

By the way, hamburgers and hotdogs arent American. Neither is Apple pie. Barbecue, cereal, granola, and jerky (and smoked fish) are really that which is American.

And barbecue is slow cooking meat, sometimes with sauce (though many self proclaimed specialists say it must have sauce). Throwing meat on a grill is grilling it. Adding barbecue sauce doesnt make it barbecue. Trust me, I'm a Native American. That is all.
Samusai
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu 02.02.2006 12:16 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby ShikenkanBebii » Thu 02.02.2006 1:49 pm

Hmm. I actually like chitlins with a little bit of hot sauce. My grandmother makes some pretty good ones around Thanksgiving and Xmas. Personally, I don't like barbequed anything though, or even the sauce, and most of my family lives off of BBQ'ed chicken and ribs. I'd love to go to Japan and try some real sushi, just to see if I can spot the difference between the sushi made here in America and the sushi over there. The sushi I've had at this one place called Yamato was actually pretty good. I like to try some new things though. As a matter of fact, I'd probably try the strangest thing on the menu first, just to check it out. I'll have to work on my skills with chopsticks though. I can never quite get it just right.

Has anyone ever tried pocky or ramune? I've heard they're very delicious, but I have no idea where to find any. Just about ever snack food in America can be found in Japan, but it doesn't seem like Japanese food is easy to find in America, particularly in Atlanta.

Samusai, my classmates mix up Japan and China so often that it's soooo annoying, especially after the learned that I'm studying Japanese. If they're not making those annoying little mock Chinese sounds and thinking I'll be able to "translate" it, then they're asking me if I plan on eating someone's pet when I visit Japan. If I weren't 5 feet tall I'd smack them, but then I'd get stuffed into a locker.
User avatar
ShikenkanBebii
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon 01.02.2006 6:11 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby Shibakoen » Thu 02.02.2006 2:40 pm

Pocky's good, but Fran is my favorite. If you can find a Japanese market where you live, they'll probably have Pocky. I'd be amazed if they didn't have one in Atlanta somewhere; there's one in Greenville and just outside of Fayetteville, NC, and neither of those cities are near the size of Atl. What tripped me out was all the different flavors of KitKat they had when I was in Japan. They had weird stuff like "keylime pie" flavored Kit-Kat. They just got Orange KitKat here (SO GOOD!!) but it didn't go over well at all so it's gone now.

Instead of eating someone's pet, just tell them that you can't wait to eat some of Secretariat's gradkids. Cow tongue is good, they serve it at any good Yaki-niku, but my favorite, I'll say it again, is raw horse. Anyway, it's clear there aren't any hog farms near ATL, or they probably wouldn't be so weirded out by some of this stuff. I can't eat pork anymore because the hog trucks that roll through here give off the most unpleasant smell I've ever had the misfortune of smelling. It makes your eyes water, it's sooo foul. Poultry trucks aren't much better, but hog trucks are just disgusting.
User avatar
Shibakoen
 
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon 03.28.2005 5:17 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby Samusai » Thu 02.02.2006 2:54 pm

My friend's uncle brought back with him a big box of pocky and calpis. Oooh man... we sat in his room for three days eating it, watching Outlaw Star that his uncle also bought him. Pocky is my FAVORITE food on Earth. To bad it's so expensive if you CAN find it in stores. And of course, calpis would have to get a new name or atleast pronounciation if it was to be sold in the US.

Also reminds me of the time that his mom left wine bottles in the freezer, so we scooped up the shattered glass and sluchy wine into a bowl and ate it. We picked out the large pieces of glass, but we ended up eating some.... wow, we were stupid....
Samusai
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu 02.02.2006 12:16 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby mayosta » Sat 02.04.2006 12:23 am

What exactly is Poki?
mayosta
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue 08.09.2005 6:51 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby hamsterfreak4evr » Sat 02.04.2006 1:03 am

Pocky is really delicous biscuilt sticks dipped in chocolate, usually. ooh...i tried chocolate mousse pocky the other day....so amazing!!

at my friends christmas party i tried ox tongue (she's turkish). it tastes like beef but much tougher. i tried it but couldnt eat it because of wat it was...if i thot it was steak i would have had a 2nd serving!
User avatar
hamsterfreak4evr
 
Posts: 387
Joined: Sun 07.17.2005 8:21 pm
Location: America
Native language: english
Gender: Female

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby shikamarufoo » Sat 02.04.2006 1:09 am

Pocky is a thin biscuit dipped in various flavors. I've been hearing Pocky is overpriced in Japan, is that true? Also what is calpis?
ShikenkanBebii wrote:
Has anyone ever tried pocky or ramune? I've heard they're very delicious, but I have no idea where to find any. Just about ever snack food in America can be found in Japan, but it doesn't seem like Japanese food is easy to find in America, particularly in Atlanta.

I have tried ramune, it was a weird shape (peach flavored is the one I had) carbonated soda. The top is shut by a ball, and the ball can come off and stay on, sorry can't explain it so well.


Gosh I hate those people who have stereotypical ideas about Japan and China or anywhere in Asia:@. There like go eat dog/cat/etc...food is food and most food is really good until people know what it is (it doesn't happen to me though and I'm happy I can eat it knowing what it is).
shikamarufoo
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Mon 12.26.2005 9:31 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby J_lima09 » Sat 02.04.2006 3:23 am

learn how to use the chopsticks buddy


yeah i try to get my friends to know the difference between chinese and japanese people but they just dont learn and give me the reply "same thing"
My lawns emo, so it cuts itself
User avatar
J_lima09
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri 01.13.2006 9:29 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby nikonikoniko » Sat 02.04.2006 7:28 pm

shikamarufoo wrote:
How do they write kfc in katakana?


KFC. ;)

Seriously, that's how they write it. Katakana isn't used.
nikonikoniko
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Sat 02.04.2006 7:23 pm

RE: Eating in Japan...

Postby Shibakoen » Sat 02.04.2006 9:35 pm

J_lima09 wrote:

yeah i try to get my friends to know the difference between chinese and japanese people but they just dont learn and give me the reply "same thing"


What's interesting is just how diverse Chinese food really is. There are several Chinese students in my Econ program, and one of the things I've learned from them is that there's quite the variety among Chinese food. Apparently Guangdong food is known for being very different from the food in places like Shanghai. I have been to one really good Chinese restaurant in lower Manhattan that was phenominal, though. Seems like every "ethnic" food here in the States is pretty much butchered. We can't even get pizza right.

Oh, and don't forget, you don't pronounce KFC the same way. It's K-F-Shi.
Last edited by Shibakoen on Sat 02.04.2006 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Shibakoen
 
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon 03.28.2005 5:17 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Culture and Info about living in Japan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests