Jobs in Japan

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Sumi
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Jobs in Japan

Post by Sumi » Sun 08.20.2006 10:46 pm

I was reading about the need of lawyers in Japan. I was wondering how difficult is it for a foreigner to become a lawyer in Japan? Since I want too, is it better for me to go to a law school here in the states and then go to Japan?


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060820/ap_ ... g_to_court
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chikara
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RE: Jobs in Japan

Post by chikara » Sun 08.20.2006 11:14 pm

This blog of an American lawyer working in a Japanese law office may give you some useful insights.
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keatonatron
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RE: Jobs in Japan

Post by keatonatron » Mon 08.21.2006 6:10 am

Moved from Grammar section.

I'm sure it could be done, but I don't know how many Japanese people would opt to put their well-being in your hands. I guess you could work as a prosecutor. Plus learning all the lawyer lingo would be really hard and could have very large consequences if you misunderstand something.

Generally, jobs where miscommunication due to language barrier could ruin someone's life should probably be avoided (i.e. police, doctor, lawyer, fireman, plastic surgeon, etc.)

I wouldn't disuade you from becoming a lawyer, and I wouldn't disuade you from trying to live and work in Japan, but I can't say I support the idea of mixing the two.

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Mike Cash
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RE: Jobs in Japan

Post by Mike Cash » Mon 08.21.2006 6:18 am

keatonatron wrote:
Moved from Grammar section.

I'm sure it could be done
It would only require a very high mastery of some very difficult Japanese (yes, they have the same impenetrable "legalese" that lawyers the world over have), acceptance (very competitive) to Japanese law school, graduation from the school, and passing the national bar exam. I'm not sure, but it may require Japanese citizenship as well. A perfunctory J-Google search returned nothing definitive.

I guess you could work as a prosecutor.
I feel almost 100% certain in saying that working as a prosecutor does require Japanese citizenship.

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AJBryant
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RE: Jobs in Japan

Post by AJBryant » Mon 08.21.2006 10:32 am

Plus there are all those interpersonal cues and things (haragei, etc.) that really are hard to learn, and are best picked up while growing up in the culture...


Tony

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