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Working in Japan

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Working in Japan

Postby creativity » Sat 10.07.2006 4:36 pm

What sort of temporary job could an 18-year-old European girl (who doesn't speak fluent japanese yet) find in Japan? What problems could there be?

Thank you in advance for any answers (as I might forget later ;) )
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby ComradeJoe » Sat 10.07.2006 5:38 pm

creativity wrote:
an 18-year-old European | What problems could there be?



creativity wrote:
(who doesn't speak fluent japanese yet) | What problems could there be?



Well, you're 18 (assuming you're talking about yourself), so you probably don't have any solid qualifications yet.
I was going to say you could work in a restaurant, taking orders or washing plates or something along those lines (hey, low-end), but sadly you wouldn't be able to understand your orders. To top it, you're foreign. If I were a japanese employer I surely wouldn't hire some foreigner, who probably wouldn't understand what i'm saying, to wipe floors or clean plates. :|

You might have a slim chance at getting a half-decent job as a teacher's assistant if you have a CAE though.
Last edited by ComradeJoe on Sat 10.07.2006 5:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby creativity » Sat 10.07.2006 5:52 pm

Thank you for your reply. But what is a CAE?
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby ComradeJoe » Sat 10.07.2006 7:57 pm

Certificate in Advanced English IIRC. Very useful, especially in non-english countries. B)
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Sat 10.07.2006 8:07 pm

Are you planning on coming over under the working holiday visa program?

If not, your question is moot.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby creativity » Sun 10.08.2006 7:02 am

Comerade Joe wrote:

Certificate in Advanced English IIRC. Very useful, especially in non-english countries.



I don't know whether it'll be a CAE, but I'm going to take English Language as an A level (still 3 years to go till i'm 18) and apparently there's some sort of diploma I can take at the same time that will enable me to teach english abroad. I think that must be it...

Mike Cash wrote:

Are you planning on coming over under the working holiday visa program?

If not, your question is moot.



I don't really know what visa I'd need. I'd just like some kind of work experiance in Japan for a few months during my gap year. What sort of Visa would I need for that?
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Sun 10.08.2006 7:57 am

The Working Holiday visa program is the only thing that's going to allow you to come here and work without having a degree. That's why I said your question is moot unless you are looking at this program.

Everybody who wants to come to Japan and work, be it short-term or long-term, seems to get the cart before the horse. They always want to nail down the job prospects before giving thought to visa eligibility.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby aKuMu » Sun 10.08.2006 7:57 am

What kind of work could an 18 Year old Japanese, with no Work experience/qualifications, and not being able to speak English, get in England? Brush Toiletts?

..as already being said, with no speaking abilitys it would be hard to get any Public Jobs..
Last edited by aKuMu on Sun 10.08.2006 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby colind » Sun 10.08.2006 8:21 am

While I was in Tokyo I met a few guys from England who were on their gap year. They were connected with an organisation teaching English at Junior High School. The organisation arranged everything for them... money, accomodation etc.
If your are considering this for your gap year, I suggest you look into different organisations who send people to different countries to teach English.
Good luck!
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby AJBryant » Sun 10.08.2006 12:48 pm

Actually, I can think of *lots* of positions in Japan for 18-year-old English girls with little Japanese experience. Unfortunately, they're not the kind of jobs you'd want on your resume...


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RE: Working in Japan

Postby creativity » Sun 10.08.2006 2:06 pm

Mike Cash wrote:
The Working Holiday visa program is the only thing that's going to allow you to come here and work without having a degree. That's why I said your question is moot unless you are looking at this program.

Everybody who wants to come to Japan and work, be it short-term or long-term, seems to get the cart before the horse. They always want to nail down the job prospects before giving thought to visa eligibility.


Then yes, I'll probably try to get The Working Holiday visa program. As I said, I still have 3 years until all of this, so there's no hurry. And as for your 'get the cart before the horse', it isn't that bad. A pregnant woman will usually buy everything her future baby will need, but has no garantee that her baby will be born alive. Why not with Japan? What's the point of having a visa if you can't get a job?

akumu wrote:

What kind of work could an 18 Year old Japanese, with no Work experience/qualifications, and not being able to speak English, get in England? Brush Toiletts?

..as already being said, with no speaking abilitys it would be hard to get any Public Jobs..


By the time my gap year comes, I'll have had part time work experience(s) to pay for the flight and whatever else I'd need to pay, and I'd know how to speak, write and read basic japanese. I'd probably also have that CEA thing to be able to teach english abroad.

Colin wrote:
While I was in Tokyo I met a few guys from England who were on their gap year. They were connected with an organisation teaching English at Junior High School. The organisation arranged everything for them... money, accomodation etc.
If your are considering this for your gap year, I suggest you look into different organisations who send people to different countries to teach English.
Good luck!


Finaly some good news...Thank you Colin :D I'll try to find such an organisation...if anyone knows about one, please tell me! :D

Tony wrote:

Actually, I can think of *lots* of positions in Japan for 18-year-old English girls with little Japanese experience. Unfortunately, they're not the kind of jobs you'd want on your resume...


XD That actually made me laugh. And you're right, I think I'll stay clear of 'those' kinds of jobs. ;)


Thank you all for your advice!
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby neo2407 » Sun 10.08.2006 4:56 pm

creativity wrote:
A pregnant woman will usually buy everything her future baby will need, but has no garantee that her baby will be born alive.


That's well...disturbing and morbid. True but morbid.

I'd like to thank the people that posted here aswell. If all goes well, I'll be moving to Japan in...maybe 5-10 years (constantly working so I have enough money for an apartment and everything). You guys gave me a little more information.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Sun 10.08.2006 5:26 pm

creativity wrote:
Mike Cash wrote:
The Working Holiday visa program is the only thing that's going to allow you to come here and work without having a degree. That's why I said your question is moot unless you are looking at this program.

Everybody who wants to come to Japan and work, be it short-term or long-term, seems to get the cart before the horse. They always want to nail down the job prospects before giving thought to visa eligibility.


Then yes, I'll probably try to get The Working Holiday visa program. As I said, I still have 3 years until all of this, so there's no hurry. And as for your 'get the cart before the horse', it isn't that bad. A pregnant woman will usually buy everything her future baby will need, but has no garantee that her baby will be born alive. Why not with Japan? What's the point of having a visa if you can't get a job?



I think perhaps you still don't quite see the whole picture.

In Japan, at least, getting the job and getting the visa are Siamese twins, joined at the hip.

Most commonly, this sort of inquiry regarding what sort of jobs people who are totally unqualified for anything and totally devoid of Japanese ability can get in Japan tend to come from people who come nowhere near the minimum requirements set forth by the Japanese government for getting a visa. In the case of those people from countries which have Working Holiday agreements with Japan, there is hope. For people from the rest of the world, there is none.

What one typically sees in these online Japan-related forums is an identical sort of question from someone who is not eligible for a regular working visa, nor for a Working Holiday visa either. Their inquiry is usually met with lots of ignorant replies suggesting different types of work. No one wants to be the one to throw a bucket of cold water on their dreams by telling them they are nowhere near qualifying for a visa.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby keatonatron » Mon 10.09.2006 12:31 am

Mike Cash wrote:
No one wants to be the one to throw a bucket of cold water on their dreams by telling them they are nowhere near qualifying for a visa.


Except one Mike Cash from 123 Coldwater Way, Seoul, Korea.

The reason it's important to figure out the visa first, is that the visa determines what type of job you can get, not the other way around. If you aren't qualified for a visa, and/or can't make the immigration office believe Japan needs your services, it doesn't matter if you have 1 or even 20 job offers from within Japan--you won't be able to take them without a visa.

For citizens of England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, France, and Germany, there is a working holiday visa. This is not the same as a work visa--it's simply an extended tourist/travel visa that allows you to get a part-time job to help pay for the extra expenses of a longer stay in Japan, away from your job in your home country. Under this visa you can only stay up to one year, and you must leave at the end of that time.

For those of you who just want to work in Japan for a short while (like the OP), the first step would be to find out about the working holiday visa. For those of you wanting to work in Japan long-term (or are coming from a country that doesn't have the working holiday visa), you should find out about normal work visas, and what requirements they have.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Mon 10.09.2006 2:22 am

keatonatron wrote:
Mike Cash wrote:
No one wants to be the one to throw a bucket of cold water on their dreams by telling them they are nowhere near qualifying for a visa.


Except one Mike Cash from 123 Coldwater Way, Seoul, Korea.



I recall visiting Seoul once. I thought I left some time ago, but it is always nice to be corrected.
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