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Working in Japan

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RE: Working in Japan

Postby keatonatron » Mon 01.22.2007 8:02 am

Nischi85 wrote:
But, I have been told that if you already are in japan, and got a visa(not counting tourist visa). already living in the country. It's much easier to get a work visa since you are already here. I don't know if that is true at all.


Being able to speak Japanese and/or making a serious attempt at blending in to the culture is something they look for and a big plus. Obivously if you are already in Japan, you would be much further on your way than someone who has never been here before.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Mon 01.22.2007 9:25 am

Nischi85 wrote:
It seems you guy's know a lot about these sort of things.....


I'm swedish, 21 years old....

My problem, is that I have girl here, which I of course want to be able to stay with after I finish my studies in about 1.5 year. But I just don't know how.... marriage is a bit out of the league, I'm way too young for that in my oppinion. I'm prepared to do about anything since I feel this is the person I wanna live with.



You're either ready to get married, or you're ready to leave her alone so she can get on with her life. Those are the two options for a responsible adult.

I married at 20 and we just recently marked our 21st anniversary. In hindsight, I would have to agree with that you're too young for marriage.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Kagemaru » Mon 01.22.2007 10:17 am

Nischi85 wrote:
Won't the company issue a working visa for me, or.. rather in my case, a change from student visa into work visa that is more likely to be accepted? Or is it stil no difference for the big guys up in the immigration bureau deciding who to let in and not?


If a company wants you, and you have the minimum requirements (which aren't minimum once you read into it) they will organise all of it for you.

I have lot's of computer experience, althou of course not a real degree as in bachelor's or master's degree.


This will be a problem shooting for a business visa. There are loopholes however.

I could teach english and swedish, if it weren't for that most places want native speakers in english, sadly enough since I speak well.


The major English conversation schools require you to have a degree in anything to qualify to teach regardless of visa status.

Would getting a TOIC test with good scores help me anything at all?

Unfortunately, no.

My problem, is that I have girl here,
which I of course want to be able to stay with after I finish my studies in about 1.5 year. But I just don't know how.... marriage is a bit out of the league, I'm way too young for that in my oppinion. I'm prepared to do about anything since I feel this is the person I wanna live with.


This one also very tough. Marrying a Japanese woman requires you to have to enter her family register. Which also means a member of her family(usually the father) has to act as your guarantor in the event you decide to take off overseas and leave a pile of debt.

How do I stay here? Please give me some good news

Sure. Firstly this book. I bought it before I came to Japan. 424 pages of heavy reading, but covers all current immigration, labour and health legislation relative to foreigners.

Secondly, also before I came here, I bought the 2003 Japanese English language [url=http://www.springerlink.com/content/l8u2rg770800355q/
]reform[/url] action plan. Also heavy reading. Basically outlining the Japanese education ministries proposals to mandate and introduce English studies from elementary school opposed to its current junior high school initiation from 2008.

How does that apply to you I hear you asking?

In the mad scramble pre 2008, the current native English speaking population within Japan will not be able to cope with the demand. Moreover, kindergardens are introducing English into its curriculum more and more. In fact, in Nara in the last two months, a complete English kindergarden has opened. This may open doors for you to obtain a business visa elsewhere.

The thought frightens me. Possibly many of you are aware of how sensitive I am with the quality of English being taught to Japanese and its subsequent stereotypical attachments Japanese make when interacting with foreigners. Let's hope the bar raises.

I won't be holding my breath...
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Nischi85 » Mon 01.22.2007 12:39 pm

Thanks sooo much for all the responses.. and so fast also :S


it actually made me a little bit more positive I must say.

The last 8 days have been some of the worst in my life.

Before that I used to think something like: Ah, yeah I can speak good english, it's no problem getting work here, piece of cake. and after all, they are crazy in gaijins, so I can work anywhere!.
And then BAAAM!! Like a slap in the face, when I started researching more after information (wanted to get a part-time job since I got about 3-5 hours everyday I don't do anything in particular) I realized that I've been living in a fantasy. And that the reality is so much more... cruel, real... whatever the word that fits the most.

I've been searching from place to place for information since then, homepages by usual people, Japanese immigration bureau, Swedish immigration bureau and so on and so on.

Please correct me if I'm wrong now. But let's say, I get a job, at... hmm.. a computer company/or school for that matter. I somehow manage to persuade them into accepting me.
They agree on sending a request for a working visa to the japanese immigration bureau.
Will that company have any saying in the outcome of the decision by the bureau? I mean... they will probaby say something like, we just hired this guy and we think that he can contribute to our company/school, and other stuff like that.
Does it make the bureau more acceptable towards accepting the application, or are they cold like steel and don't care about the company's/school's request and good words just because I fail on having a bachelor's degree/master's degree ?

Or do companies even write any message at all when forwarding your request for visa? If they do, does it have any big impact on the outcome of recieving the visa?

Why I'm asking so much about this is that I have good with time, and I will be able to search for work in many places before my time here is up, and... I hope that someway I will be able to get accepted at some other place than just McD or Mos Burger.

As I have understood it's up to me to try to convince the company/school that they really need me, and that I am capable of the things I'm telling them, even thou I don't have it on papper.

My girlfriend just got a work, she didn't even comply with the minimum requirements, but stil got the work. Solely based on the interview (my personal thougths thou....)

And so many other times with works in Sweden people used to get the job without fulfilling all the necessary requirements. My thinking is of course that it might be much harder in Japan, especially for a foreigner. But it must happen, sometimes maybe?

Thanks again for reading.
Oh... and I'm stil waiting for the bucket..... :)
Last edited by Nischi85 on Mon 01.22.2007 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Harisenbon » Mon 01.22.2007 8:34 pm

My girlfriend just got a work, she didn't even comply with the minimum requirements, but stil got the work. Solely based on the interview (my personal thougths thou....)


Yes, but (I'm assuming your GF is Japanese) her company doesn't have to pay a ton of money to get her a work visa. If her firm doesn't feel that she's suitible, they can just let her go: They have not such luck with a foreigner.

In my personal opinion, it will be very hard to get a Work Visa in Japan without some sort of college degree, unless you are willing to work in manual labor fields (3K and whatnot). Getting an instructor visa (i.e. Teaching English) requires a college degree.

Perhaps the best thing to do (dependent on your Language Ability) would be to enroll yourself in a Japanese college after your current language school stint is over. Foreigners do not have to take the standard College Enterance Exams, so your chance of getting in is a bit higher than normal Japanese students. However, make sure when applying that you are applying to the regular college program, and not to a "Foreign Study" program, as the latter will not net you a degree when you finish.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Kagemaru » Tue 01.23.2007 12:01 am

Nischi85 wrote:
Please correct me if I'm wrong now. But let's say, I get a job, at... hmm.. a computer company/or school for that matter. I somehow manage to persuade them into accepting me.
They agree on sending a request for a working visa to the japanese immigration bureau.
Will that company have any saying in the outcome of the decision by the bureau? I mean... they will probaby say something like, we just hired this guy and we think that he can contribute to our company/school, and other stuff like that.
Does it make the bureau more acceptable towards accepting the application, or are they cold like steel and don't care about the company's/school's request and good words just because I fail on having a bachelor's degreeigh school/master's degree ?


I think you are a little confused. Requirements for whatever job you are applying for and immigration criteria are autonomous.

Two general situations.

1. You are originally hired part time and are offered a business visa to come into effect when the period of the current visa has expired. (In my case)

Depending on your current visa, some have work restrictions therefore, this is not possible for all visa holders to obtain, as employers would not generally offer an option of a business visa after 3 months employment.

2. From the interview, the employer will offer the job + business visa.

That book I gave you reference to has everything. 2100 yen well spent. I promise you. It will answer everything for you.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Nischi85 » Tue 01.23.2007 3:08 am

Okey thanks for replies again.

Yeah I made a note of the book's name and ISBN. I'm going to some bookstore this weekend and look for it, or ask them to order it for me :)

Kagemaru, I was thinking of the first point you made. About autonomous decision. This will in other words mean that no mather how much a company wants me, they can never get me to stay here because I don't hold a degree?

Thanks again for replies
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Tue 01.23.2007 4:17 am

Kagemaru said:
This one also very tough. Marrying a Japanese woman requires you to have to enter her family register. Which also means a member of her family(usually the father) has to act as your guarantor in the event you decide to take off overseas and leave a pile of debt.


Not quite accurate.

There is no requirement that it be a member of the family, it just tends to work out that way. After having gone through father-in-law and brother-in-law for more years and visa renewals than I care to remember, this last time we finally asked if my wife could be listed as my guarantor. She could, and she is.

Nischi85 sought clarity:
Kagemaru, I was thinking of the first point you made. About autonomous decision. This will in other words mean that no mather how much a company wants me, they can never get me to stay here because I don't hold a degree?


The company's requirements for hiring you and Immigration's requirements for granting you a visa are two separate things. You have to satisfy Immigration's requirements first.

This sort of thing can get complex, and it would probably be in your best interest to consult with an immigration attorney rather than a bunch of well-meaning strangers on the internet.
Last edited by Mike Cash on Tue 01.23.2007 4:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Working in Japan

Postby Nischi85 » Tue 01.23.2007 4:51 am

Aye Mike Cash, I see what your mean. I just hope this story ends well.... :(
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