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23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

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23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby zengargoyle » Tue 05.15.2007 12:21 pm

here's the final installment of a 10 part series detailing one foreigner’s experience of being put in a Japanese prison. 留置場 or "ryuchijyo", is a prison for locking up people for as long as 23 days until they are convicted, or cleared of a crime.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby aKuMu » Tue 05.15.2007 12:32 pm

What would we do without Alcohol B)
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby jrivera » Tue 05.15.2007 4:13 pm

Can we have Paris Hilton transfered to a Japanese prison?
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby two_heads_talking » Tue 05.15.2007 4:52 pm

I would rather they put her in a mexican prison or a korean one.. but that's me.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby lalaith » Tue 05.15.2007 5:54 pm

two_heads_talking wrote:
I would rather they put her in a mexican prison or a korean one.. but that's me.


Are you trying to be extra nice to Paris? I don't know about Korean prisons, but I've read first hand accounts of Mexican ones. Money gets you anything you want in them. People with plenty of it have a pretty cushy time in them. And Paris has plenty of it.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby tanuki » Tue 05.15.2007 10:02 pm

The best prison for her would be a chastity belt.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby lalaith » Tue 05.15.2007 10:09 pm

tanuki wrote:
The best prison for her would be a chastity belt.


There should be a smiley for laughing so hard I started to choke.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby zengargoyle » Tue 05.15.2007 11:25 pm

ermmm... the idea was to talk about prison, or police, or at least differences in the justice system between countries.. not to talk about Paris Hilton. :(
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby lalaith » Wed 05.16.2007 12:03 am

zengargoyle wrote:
ermmm... the idea was to talk about prison, or police, or at least differences in the justice system between countries.. not to talk about Paris Hilton. :(


I can do that. My hand is cramping from writing in Japanese, anyway. So I'll do some typing.

I thought the guy was kind of a wuss. From what I've seen on TV, not showering that often is typical of jail. The guards were reasonably polite. He was given reading material. The conditions really weren't that bad.

I used to donate blood. Do you know here in the US if you've spent even three days in jail you're disqualified from being a blood donor? That's how likely you are to catch something nasty in jail here. (I do not know this because I went to jail. I know this because it's on the questionnaire & I asked why.)

My last serious hobby was studying the Old West. Mostly I was interested in homesteaders, but I got off on a penal tangent and read some journals about the prisons in the Old West. I ended up visiting a few of them. I'm not getting into details, but that was some horrific conditions. And, at that, those prisons were better than what they were before that. Geesh, we used to just dig deep holes and toss people in them and let them rot in the water and their own wastes.

People in jail today, either here or in Japan, don't know how good they've got it compared to how it used to be.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby zengargoyle » Wed 05.16.2007 1:20 am

bzzt.. sorry, missed the point.... in the U.S. you might spend a weekend in jail waiting for the judge, but you can not be held without charges. they either charge you with a crime, or the let you go. in Japan, they can keep you 23 days or whatnot without ever charching you for a crime... no contact with the outside world.... a police person can yank you off the street and lock you up for almost a month without charging you with an actual crime... our (U.S. night in jail...) is their month in jail...

in the U.S. if you are taken to jail by the police, the judiciary system must in due course convict you of a crime before you are held in custody. (ignoring the heinous guatanamo bay national security nonsense..). if a police man drags me to jail on a late friday night, i'm either prosecuted or set free the next monday morning. as this article demonstrates, the Japanese police can drag you into jail and keep you for 23 days before they either set you free or prosecute you..... you can get on a police-man's bad side and end up incarcerated for a month before they let you go...

this is not old-west, and this is not third-world-country. this is modern japan. do something that they do not like and you're cut off from the world in prison for a month, then they let you go like nothing happened, no judge, no prosecution, no nothing. it's like a nite in U.S. jail stretched out over 23 days.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby lalaith » Wed 05.16.2007 1:43 am

zengargoyle wrote:
bzzt.. sorry, missed the point.... in the U.S. you might spend a weekend in jail waiting for the judge, but you can not be held without charges. they either charge you with a crime, or the let you go. in Japan, they can keep you 23 days or whatnot without ever charching you for a crime... no contact with the outside world.... a police person can yank you off the street and lock you up for almost a month without charging you with an actual crime... our (U.S. night in jail...) is their month in jail...


No, I thought about addressing that point, but it would have gotten into politics. Habeas corpus is something I feel very strongly about. And we had a recent reminder from Clay on another thread that religion and politics are verboten on this site.

But without getting into the current political climate you can be held indefinitely in prison on contempt of court or as a material witness (Certainly you can be held for months. There was one person I recall hearing about on the news who was locked up for over a year). No trial, no possibility of a trial. The government tries to argue this isn't the same thing, but as far as I'm concerned if you're in a jail cell and that door is locked behind you, it doesn't matter what it's called. You're still in custody.

Also, I don't know about where you live, but in Florida they can hold pretty much anyone for 72 hours with no arraignment, no bail, nothing. You can be locked up for 72 hours for walking down the street without carrying an ID.
Last edited by lalaith on Wed 05.16.2007 1:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby Mike Cash » Wed 05.16.2007 7:56 am

Let's be a little more precise in our language usage, shall we?

A 留置場 is not a "prison". A 刑務所 is a prison. A 留置場 is a pre-trial detention center...a police "lock-up".

Incredibly, though, persons sentenced to death are not held in prison. They are held in 留置場, or under identical conditions as a 留置場 but in separate facilities on the grounds of a prison. They are not forced to work, as are prisoners, and they are not serving a sentence. They don't begin to serve their sentence until the rope stops stretching.
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby lalaith » Wed 05.16.2007 9:55 am

Mike Cash wrote:
Incredibly, though, persons sentenced to death are not held in prison. They are held in 留置場, or under identical conditions as a 留置場 but in separate facilities on the grounds of a prison. They are not forced to work, as are prisoners, and they are not serving a sentence. They don't begin to serve their sentence until the rope stops stretching.


That's one heck of way to look at it. Did you mean that literally about the rope? Is hanging still the execution method in Japan? Does Japan hand out the death penalty often?

I know that Joji Obara wasn't sentenced to death. If he had been tried here in Florida -- well, strictly speaking I don't know if he would have gotten death because he was rich & they can afford good lawyers -- but I believe that, lawyers aside, with the rapes on video tapes and those rapes resulting in death plus what he did with the body -- he'd have gotten the death penalty. And this is Florida, not California. In Florida, like in Texas, you get the death penalty and we actually will kill you. But Obara only got life which means he could get parole in ten years, so if you don't get the death penalty for doing what he did, what does Japan hand out the death penalty for?

There was a famous case in Canada of Paul Bernardo a serial rapist, kidnapper and murderer who was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. In Canada life only means 25 years, but he was labeled a "dangerous offender" which means he will never be released. Does Japan have an equivalent process to actually keep someone locked up for the rest of their life?
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby two_heads_talking » Wed 05.16.2007 10:07 am

lalaith wrote:
two_heads_talking wrote:
I would rather they put her in a mexican prison or a korean one.. but that's me.


Are you trying to be extra nice to Paris? I don't know about Korean prisons, but I've read first hand accounts of Mexican ones. Money gets you anything you want in them. People with plenty of it have a pretty cushy time in them. And Paris has plenty of it.


no mexican prisons can hold you forever with no due cause.. and you could die in there without anyone caring either.. and I should have been more specific.. "north korean" prisons..

but after having thought about it and hearing on the news that the tent city had room, i think it best for her to got to death valley, live in a tent, and wear pink panties and pink jump suits and get pushed around in the sand like all the other prisoners.. she isn't good enough for cable tv and quite frankly, I would like to see who does what to own her for a few weeks.. she would make a terrible prison bitch though..
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RE: 23 days in a Japanese prison (留置場 ryuchijyo)

Postby Mike Cash » Wed 05.16.2007 2:47 pm

lalaith wrote:


There was a famous case in Canada of Paul Bernardo a serial rapist, kidnapper and murderer who was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. In Canada life only means 25 years, but he was labeled a "dangerous offender" which means he will never be released. Does Japan have an equivalent process to actually keep someone locked up for the rest of their life?


無期懲役. Normally means 15 years in the stir, but they can snag you back in for any amount of time for any offense for the rest of your life once you're out on "parole" on that sentence.
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