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Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby AJBryant » Wed 07.04.2007 8:23 pm

Valatunda wrote:
I believe it means “well”. I think it once made one of AJBryant's heads explode.


That happens more and more often these days.


Tony
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby john2 » Wed 07.04.2007 8:33 pm

SenescenceReign wrote:
tanuki wrote:
Johnspeak-English dictionary says:

wheal
1. int. well


Is that what it means!? I thought it was some 'lol'-thing! Or even like "roflcopter". I have no idea what half this nonsense means...

its called complexifiction of the english language,
and no complexfication is quite a logical word
it means to turn complex,

As my english is increadibly complicated badly made bad spelling and grammar and so far,

The more complicated a language is the more one can just not understand english yes one can hide that one has bad english much esier. for many people to understand the grammar is much harder then understanding how the grammar work's but threw the complexity even an amature can have the habit of hiding their mistakes in the english complexity its an ocean of rules points spelling iregularities and so forth

AJBryant wrote:
Valatunda wrote:
I believe it means “well”. I think it once made one of AJBryant's heads explode.


That happens more and more often these days.


Tony

sorry
Last edited by john2 on Wed 07.04.2007 8:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby tanuki » Wed 07.04.2007 8:56 pm

I like "complexifiction", looks like a fancy neologism.

------------

How many heads do you have, Tony?
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby john2 » Wed 07.04.2007 9:01 pm

tanuki wrote:
I like "complexifiction", looks like a fancy neologism.

thanks ;)
Last edited by john2 on Wed 07.04.2007 9:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby tanuki » Wed 07.04.2007 9:06 pm

OMFG I swear I was not aware of this when I wrote my post :o.

From Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

neologism
1 : a new word, usage, or expression
2 : a meaningless word coined by a psychotic
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby AJBryant » Wed 07.04.2007 10:09 pm

john2 wrote:
its called complexifiction of the english language,
and no complexfication is quite a logical word
it means to turn complex,


No, the verb is "complicate." There is no such word as "complexify." Likewise, the noun is "complication" -- again, no "complexification."


As my english is increadibly complicated badly made bad spelling and grammar and so far,


Huh?

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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby chikara » Wed 07.04.2007 10:15 pm

Hatori wrote:
Well, I knew there would be somebody not thinking in the right mind who would ask this question. So, I just did it for the gag. :p

I saw the thread title and I thought WTF, you've got to be @!#$% joking!!!
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby john2 » Wed 07.04.2007 10:58 pm

AJBryant wrote:
john2 wrote:
its called complexifiction of the english language,
and no complexfication is quite a logical word
it means to turn complex,


No, the verb is "complicate." There is no such word as "complexify." Likewise, the noun is "complication" -- again, no "complexification."
`

i liked the word so much :(
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby Tspoonami » Wed 07.04.2007 11:34 pm

It seems John has complexificated the word complicate...

tanuki wrote:
2 : a meaningless word coined by a psychotic

That's absolutely amazing!

We should definitely compile a full Johnspeak-English dictionary. Or, maybe just a grammar guide that explains how to correctly end a sentence and/or paragraph with a comma.
Last edited by Tspoonami on Wed 07.04.2007 11:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby Infidel » Thu 07.05.2007 12:08 am

You gotta admit, complexify does have a certain ring to it. I'll add it to wheal in my shibboleth dictionary.
Last edited by Infidel on Thu 07.05.2007 1:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby SolidSnail » Thu 07.05.2007 3:42 am

chikara wrote:
Hatori wrote:
Well, I knew there would be somebody not thinking in the right mind who would ask this question. So, I just did it for the gag. :p

I saw the thread title and I thought WTF, you've got to be @!#$% joking!!!


The question is not so far fetched as it seems. I have a friend who had a vacation in the usa, and at some point an american friend asked her, genuinely surprised, "What, you DON'T celebrate thanksgiving in Portugal??"

(sigh...)
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby tanuki » Thu 07.05.2007 5:23 am

Erm...


From Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

complexify

Main Entry:
com·plex·i·fy Listen to the pronunciation of complexify
Pronunciation:
\käm-ˈplek-sə-ˌfī, kəm-\
Function:
verb
Inflected Form(s):
com·plex·i·fied; com·plex·i·fy·ing
Date:
1830

transitive verb
: to make complex
intransitive verb
: to become complex
Last edited by tanuki on Thu 07.05.2007 5:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby john2 » Thu 07.05.2007 5:28 am

tanuki wrote:
Erm...


From Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

complexify

Main Entry:
com·plex·i·fy Listen to the pronunciation of complexify
Pronunciation:
\käm-ˈplek-sə-ˌfī, kəm-\
Function:
verb
Inflected Form(s):
com·plex·i·fied; com·plex·i·fy·ing
Date:
1830

transitive verb
: to make complex
intransitive verb
: to become complex

I've been trying to tell people, I haven't made that word since age's.

and to another persons coment, wheal I just used a full stop.
Last edited by john2 on Thu 07.05.2007 5:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby Mike Cash » Thu 07.05.2007 5:51 am

Tspoonami wrote:
It seems John has complexificated the word complicate...

tanuki wrote:
2 : a meaningless word coined by a psychotic

That's absolutely amazing!

We should definitely compile a full Johnspeak-English dictionary. Or, maybe just a grammar guide that explains how to correctly end a sentence and/or paragraph with a comma.


From http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/aphasia.htm


In contrast to Broca's aphasia, damage to the temporal lobe may result in a fluent aphasia that is called Wernicke's aphasia. Individuals with Wernicke's aphasia may speak in long sentences that have no meaning, add unnecessary words, and even create new "words." For example, someone with Wernicke's aphasia may say, "You know that smoodle pinkered and that I want to get him round and take care of him like you want before," meaning "The dog needs to go out so I will take him for a walk." Individuals with Wernicke's aphasia usually have great difficulty understanding speech and are therefore often unaware of their mistakes.


I sometimes wonder if john2 doesn't have a mild case of this.
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RE: Do the Japanese celebrate 4th of July??

Postby john2 » Thu 07.05.2007 7:14 am

Mike Cash wrote:
Tspoonami wrote:
It seems John has complexificated the word complicate...

tanuki wrote:
2 : a meaningless word coined by a psychotic

That's absolutely amazing!

We should definitely compile a full Johnspeak-English dictionary. Or, maybe just a grammar guide that explains how to correctly end a sentence and/or paragraph with a comma.


From http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/aphasia.htm


In contrast to Broca's aphasia, damage to the temporal lobe may result in a fluent aphasia that is called Wernicke's aphasia. Individuals with Wernicke's aphasia may speak in long sentences that have no meaning, add unnecessary words, and even create new "words." For example, someone with Wernicke's aphasia may say, "You know that smoodle pinkered and that I want to get him round and take care of him like you want before," meaning "The dog needs to go out so I will take him for a walk." Individuals with Wernicke's aphasia usually have great difficulty understanding speech and are therefore often unaware of their mistakes.


I sometimes wonder if john2 doesn't have a mild case of this.

Nope I don't have it. I picked up my comma habit from someone else, cause you demanded punctuation so much. and the wheal i apear to only have popularized out side of speah, it was orriginally a spocken word.
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