Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - Similarities in Folk Stories

Similarities in Folk Stories

Discussions on Japan's history or Japanese books!

Similarities in Folk Stories

Postby coco » Thu 05.28.2009 9:42 pm

One of my favorite folk stories is called へっぴり嫁.
You can read and listen to the story from here( 山形弁) and here(標準語).
(There seems to be a few versions, an Ibaraki version and a Yamagata version. The title and a detail can be varied.)

In brief, the story is about a young wife of someone's son. She makes so big fart that is strong enough to blow her mother-in-law to the ceiling.

When discussing this story with my friends the other day, one of them said that there is a same kind of folk story in Germany. But unfortunately, he didn't remember the whole story.

I am curious about the story told in Germany.
Is there anyone who knows the title of the story in Germany or elsewhere?

Thank you.
coco
 
Posts: 3061
Joined: Mon 05.30.2005 12:43 am
Location: 東京都
Native language: 日本語(Japanese)

Re: Similarities in Folk Stories

Postby keatonatron » Fri 05.29.2009 4:37 am

I don't know anything about this story in other countries, but I enjoyed listening to it.

I hope it's okay if I ask a few questions!

What is a 馬引き? It seems to literally be "a person who pulls a horse," but does that refer to a trader(商人)?
Why would his kite be so valuable? Or is that just part of the story? タコがそんなに貴重なものでしたか?それか、この物語だけのために馬引きの「愛タコ」になってるのでしょうか? :lol:

I don't know what the last line means: いちがさきは、ざっと、おいもうした。
Is it actually: 位置が先は、ざっと、追い申した?

I couldn't find 追い申す anywhere, but I would guess it means something like "amend [change] what was said". Is this the moral of the story? I would guess it's kind of like our saying "hindsight is 20/20" (when looking at the past, everyone has perfect vision[視力]).
User avatar
keatonatron
 
Posts: 4838
Joined: Sat 02.04.2006 3:31 am
Location: Tokyo (Via Seattle)
Native language: English
Gender: Male

Re: Similarities in Folk Stories (語り納め)

Postby coco » Fri 05.29.2009 1:20 pm

keatonatron wrote:What is a 馬引き? It seems to literally be "a person who pulls a horse," but does that refer to a trader(商人)?

はい。おっしゃるとおりです。馬引きは、馬子、馬方と同じ意味で、今でいえば運輸業ですね。
(「馬子にも衣装」ということわざがありますが、これは女性に対して使うと怒られます。)

Why would his kite be so valuable? Or is that just part of the story? タコがそんなに貴重なものでしたか?それか、この物語だけのために馬引きの「愛タコ」になってるのでしょうか? :lol:


私もこの凧のオチには違和感を覚えました。
山形バージョンでは、舟の帆に風圧を与えて舟を動かしたとされていますし、他のバージョンには
・柿の実を落とした
・梨の実を落とした
・大根を抜いた
などがあるようです。 
たぶん地元の風土や地形にあわせて話を変化させていったのでしょう。
将軍の世継ぎ、あるいは藩主の跡取りの凧がひっかかって、その守役が罰せられたというような逸話の残っている地域が生んだ話なのかもしれません。

I don't know what the last line means: いちがさきは、ざっと、おいもうした。
Is it actually: 位置が先は、ざっと、追い申した?

I couldn't find 追い申す anywhere, but I would guess it means something like "amend [change] what was said". Is this the moral of the story? I would guess it's kind of like our saying "hindsight is 20/20" (when looking at the past, everyone has perfect vision[視力]).


民話には「語り納め」と呼ばれる結び言葉(結句)があります。「めでたし、めでたし」が一般的ですが、これも同じものです。
私も、「いちがさきはざっとおいもうした」は今回音声のあるサイトを探して初めて聞きました。
山形弁のものだと最後が「トッピン カラリン ナエケド」になっていますよね。
これが見やすいかもしれませんが、ここ(下方)にある福島の「いちがさけ申した」が近い結句です。これには「市が栄え申した」「一期栄え申した」の両説があるようです。
「ざっとおいもうした」だけなら、「大まかに(話の筋を)追いました」と解釈することもできますが、これだと前半の「いちがさき」の「いちがさき」が語り部の名前になってしまいそうです。 なんでしょうね。 :?
他の地域の語り納めも意味がよくわからないものがありますから、語感を楽しんでください。 :)
coco
 
Posts: 3061
Joined: Mon 05.30.2005 12:43 am
Location: 東京都
Native language: 日本語(Japanese)

Re: Similarities in Folk Stories (語り納め)

Postby keatonatron » Fri 05.29.2009 3:29 pm

coco wrote:民話には「語り納め」と呼ばれる結び言葉(結句)があります。「めでたし、めでたし」が一般的ですが、これも同じものです。
私も、「いちがさきはざっとおいもうした」は今回音声のあるサイトを探して初めて聞きました。
山形弁のものだと最後が「トッピン カラリン ナエケド」になっていますよね。
これが見やすいかもしれませんが、ここ(下方)にある福島の「いちがさけ申した」が近い結句です。これには「市が栄え申した」「一期栄え申した」の両説があるようです。
「ざっとおいもうした」だけなら、「大まかに(話の筋を)追いました」と解釈することもできますが、これだと前半の「いちがさき」の「いちがさき」が語り部の名前になってしまいそうです。 なんでしょうね。 :?
他の地域の語り納めも意味がよくわからないものがありますから、語感を楽しんでください。 :)


なるほどね!
ことわざではなく、"And that's how the story goes."みたいな、例の締め方だと言えますね。

面白かったです。ありがとうございます。
User avatar
keatonatron
 
Posts: 4838
Joined: Sat 02.04.2006 3:31 am
Location: Tokyo (Via Seattle)
Native language: English
Gender: Male


Return to History and Literature Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests