Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - "baby talk"

"baby talk"

Japanese, general discussion on the language

RE: "baby talk"

Postby AJBryant » Wed 02.06.2008 7:46 pm

Wakannai wrote:
When I was little they would sing frera jeaquea. I can still sing it word for word. But I don't understand a word I'm saying.


That would be "Frere Jacques."

:p

I learned both English and French versions when I was a kid -- dad was a big Francophile. :)

Also learned "Alouette," "Sur la Pon d'Avignon," "Mes Sabots," and pretty much the entire official "French kids' song" oeuvre.

Tony
User avatar
AJBryant
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5313
Joined: Sun 10.09.2005 11:29 am
Location: Indiana
Native language: English
Gender: Male

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Mairead » Wed 02.06.2008 8:04 pm

I harbor no illusions that my son will be fluent or even close as a result of using some japanese around the house however I do think it is still worth doing.

I grew up with some Irish Gaelic words sprinkled in at home (and this is very often the same in Ireland where Irish is studyed at school but few are fluent). I always thought it gave me a sense of my heritage and I liked the fact that my parents could whisper simple instructions to me (e.g. "be quiet") without everyone knowing they were reprimanding me.

So I really do appreciate any help that anyone can give me.
Mairead
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed 02.06.2008 3:43 am

RE: "baby talk"

Postby OitaFish » Wed 02.06.2008 8:45 pm

Is your husband fluent in Japanese? If so, and if your husband speaks Japanese to your son all the time and you speak English all the time, he will be bilingual. And, if you are like me, by the time your son is 3 years old, you will be learning Japanese from him.

Another thing I would recommend when he is old enough is to get some Japanese videos. My son really likes Anpanman and Inai Inai Baa (although he has kind of outgrown that one).
User avatar
OitaFish
 
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed 01.30.2008 1:34 am
Location: Oita, Japan

RE: "baby talk"

Postby gfunk » Thu 02.07.2008 12:14 am

I always thought it gave me a sense of my heritage and I liked the fact that my parents could whisper simple instructions to me (e.g. "be quiet") without everyone knowing they were reprimanding me.


That's genius... Being able to talk to your parents in a language no one else knows gives you a nice connection. That's exactly the way I started learning English through my parents. Even a couple of words give you an idea with pronunciation and intonation. Nowadays, I can speak better English than many Americans... haha.

Btw... no one has said it in German yet!

Bruder Jakob, Bruder Jakob,
Schläfst du noch? Schläfst du noch?
Hörst du nicht die Glocken
Horst du nicht die Glocken
Ding dong dang,
ding dong dang.

And just to show off here's spanish: B)

Martinillo, Martinillo
Donde estas, donde estas
Toca la campana, Toca la campana,
Ding, dong, dang,
ding, dong, dang.
Last edited by gfunk on Thu 02.07.2008 12:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
gfunk
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Sat 10.06.2007 11:56 pm

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Mairead » Thu 02.07.2008 12:46 am

In answer to Oita fish's question---no my husband is not fluent. He only knows a very few words. He is third generation Japnese-American and dispite the fact that his grandparents only spoke japanese, his parents wanted him to feel "American" so they did not teach him Japanese and he really wishes he knew more.

That's why we could really use help esp. from native speakers. (His Parents are no longer here... so we can't ask them)
Mairead
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed 02.06.2008 3:43 am

RE: "baby talk"

Postby OitaFish » Thu 02.07.2008 1:20 am

I see your dilemma now. I've never heard the word "baba" used. My wife has always told my son "kitanai" (meaning dirty) when she didn't want him to touch something or put something in his mouth. She said it a lot and now, at 3 years old, he is a clean freak.

My wife used "manma" a lot to ask if he was hungry. It means cooked rice (I think it is baby talk). The down side of this is that it sounds too much like "mama". When we were in the US, my son would say "manma" when he was hungry and everyone assumed he was calling his mother.

The other word she used a lot was "dame" (pronounced da -- rhymes with ma or pa, may -- like the month). That means no.

[url=http://kan-chan.stbbs.net/babytalk.html]
Have you seen this site?[/url] It looks like it has a pretty decent list.

One that is not there -- ku-ku for shoes. Shoes in Japanese is kutsu but it is hard for kids to say, so they say ku-ku first.
User avatar
OitaFish
 
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed 01.30.2008 1:34 am
Location: Oita, Japan

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Mairead » Thu 02.07.2008 3:32 am

Oita Fish--

Thank you. That glossary was interesting. I had been searching but hadn't found anything like that. I do recognize neh-neh for bedtime and shi shi. Oddly a lot of the words he knows involve bodily functions. That may be the result of growing up in a house full of boys.

Language books generally have speech that either doesn't deal with words you would say at home or they use a formality that one wouldn't use at home..so they can't be the sole source for info.

Lastly, since you also have a son, how would your wife say "good boy" or something like that?

Thanks so much for the help.
Mairead
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed 02.06.2008 3:43 am

RE: "baby talk"

Postby OitaFish » Thu 02.07.2008 4:40 am

Oriko + name + chan would be a good way to say "good boy". Actually, I think it means good kid so it probably works for a girl too.

My son has gotten used to this enough that when he does something he is proud of, he tells him mom that he is "oriko".
User avatar
OitaFish
 
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed 01.30.2008 1:34 am
Location: Oita, Japan

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Tesu » Thu 02.07.2008 6:34 am

The other word she used a lot was "dame" (pronounced da -- rhymes with ma or pa, may -- like the month). That means no.


The "me" sound is nothing like "May", at least not in any accent I can think of.
User avatar
Tesu
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Thu 04.27.2006 5:08 pm

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Noob » Thu 02.07.2008 7:02 am

It's more of a meh sound i believe.
Noob
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Wed 10.24.2007 5:04 pm

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Cratz » Thu 02.07.2008 9:35 am

お利口さん - orikoh-san
"good kid"

another, similar one is 賢い - kashikoi
"(you're so) smart"

But really, what the OP is asking for is the native-level, situation-appropriate response to very unpredictable/unforseen actions, in child-like speech. This is an interesting (as a kindergarten teacher, I could go on about this about for hours), but overly large topic for an internet forum.

The aforementioned website gives a very (VERY) basic, but decent, list of some starter terms and phrases.
Cratz
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu 02.07.2008 9:01 am

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Shirasagi » Thu 02.07.2008 10:35 am

Personally, rather than use Japanese baby terms out of their regular context (and which he will likely not really remember, and if he does -- what good does it do him?), I think a far better idea would be get tapes or DVDs or Japanese children's shows, and possibly later "Ultraman" tapes and the like when he's a little older.

I think this would be good for a number of reasons. First, he might certainly pick up some Japanese, and what he'd pick up would be actual usable Japanese. I have an American friend who has a four year old here. He was born in Japan, but both his parents speak English at home. He's an avid Ultraman fan, and even though he can't read any of the Japanese Ultraman books he has, he can perfectly identify every incarnation of Ultraman and every bad guy. He's picked up a lot Japanese just from the TV he's seen. Second, the storylines are pretty easy to follow, even without understanding everything. Third, and most important, this will really give him a sense of his heritage: just about every Japanese person born since 1955 or has grown up with Ultraman. The shows will provide him with positive, heroic Asian men as role models -- something that is rather lacking in American media.

These positive memories and associations could very easily carry over to an interest in Japanese language and culture when he's older.

I think Anpanman would be especially good for a three or four year old.
Josh Reyer
------------
頓ニ纜ヲ斬テ大荒ニ入レ。
長岡桃嶺房成
Shirasagi
 
Posts: 443
Joined: Wed 02.14.2007 10:50 am

RE: "baby talk"

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 02.07.2008 1:15 pm

Shirasagi wrote:
The shows will provide him with positive, heroic Asian men as role models -- something that is rather lacking in American media.

These positive memories and associations could very easily carry over to an interest in Japanese language and culture when he's older.
.


Unless you mean specifically japanese here, you are sadly mistaken.

Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Joan Chen, Chow Yun-Fat, Jet Li, Shu Qi, Russell Wong,John Cho ,Jang Dong Gun, Pat Morita, George Takei, Yunjin kim, Moon Bloodgood, Zhang Ziyi, Ken Watanabe, Michelle Yeoh, Devon Aoki, Lucy Liu, Sandra Oh, Ming-Na Wen, Masi Oka, Tia Carrere, Kelly HU, Bai LIng, Sendhil Ramamurthy, Daniel Dae Kim Gong Li, James Hong, Lea Salonga, Parminder Nagra, Shin Koyamada.

Are only a few of the Asian actors now prevalent on the Hollywood arena..
User avatar
two_heads_talking
 
Posts: 4137
Joined: Thu 04.06.2006 11:03 am
Native language: English

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Mike Cash » Thu 02.07.2008 3:29 pm

I'd hate to know that I had to look to pop culture entertainment to derive a sense of self-worth. I've never understood that whole way of thinking.
Never underestimate my capacity for pettiness.
User avatar
Mike Cash
 
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun 08.20.2006 3:38 am
Native language: English

RE: "baby talk"

Postby Mairead » Fri 02.08.2008 3:33 am

The glossary Oitafish gave me was very helpful. I started googling the individual words and came up with other pretty similar sites. All in all I know more now than I did when I started which is the point. Japanesebabytalk.com is cute and done well.

Nothing is a substitute for formal lang instr with a native speaker but I have appreciated the help.
Mairead
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed 02.06.2008 3:43 am

PreviousNext

Return to Japanese General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests