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i think they should make an article on...

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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby caseclosed » Wed 09.28.2005 5:25 pm

skrhgh3b wrote:
Harisenbon wrote:
-shi(氏/し) is a suffix often used in news articles, or when speaking to a high ranking private citizen. For example, whenever Bill Gates is in the news, he is referred to as ゲイツ氏.



hey, thanks for the reply. i actually learned something. so, i wonder if 〜shi is an ironic title among otakus or something. i get the jokes about shibuya slang, but the akihabara stuff just goes right over my head (^^;

i dont get eather, mostly because i dont hear them but.... even if i did i wouldnt
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Harisenbon » Thu 09.29.2005 4:45 am

I don't undersatnd what you mean. Do akibake say shi alot? the only bit I know is moe. ;)
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby skrhgh3b » Thu 09.29.2005 11:51 am

Harisenbon wrote:
I don't undersatnd what you mean. Do akibake say shi alot? the only bit I know is moe. ;)


yeah, densha otoko's otaku friends call him yamada-shi, like i said, which is why i asked about it.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby KeroGero » Sat 10.01.2005 3:04 am

~tan 〔〜タン〕 I have heard that is a childish mispronounciation of "~chan"

~P 〔〜ピ〕 Just another cutesy name ender, sometimes just written with the letter "P" by itself, rather than kana. I've seen it used in the Sailormoon manga 〔みなP、ルナP〕, and I believe that's where the 「〜ッピ」 in 「ケロッピ」 comes from. Don't know what the P stands for, if it stands for anything.

~ko 〔〜子/〜こ〕 This is sometimes added to girl's names as an honourific. 「子」 is a very common kanji to see at the end of female names. I've seen it used to mean "girl".
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Harisenbon » Sat 10.01.2005 10:15 pm

KeroGero

こ is really not as much a honorific suffix, as it is part of the name. For example, my wife's name is ゆみこ the こ is not a suffix, but rather part of her name. ゆみ would be a different name entirely.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby skrhgh3b » Sat 10.01.2005 11:00 pm

Harisenbon wrote:
KeroGero

こ is really not as much a honorific suffix, as it is part of the name. For example, my wife's name is ゆみこ the こ is not a suffix, but rather part of her name. ゆみ would be a different name entirely.


on the other hand, my significant other is named 典子(のりこ), but she infinitely preferes to be called のり.... as far as my understanding goes, 子 is a suffix, but honorific is probably not the right word for it.
♪夢も見たくない 幸せなんか要らない
恋もしたくない お金なんか要らない
ぼくに必要な眠りを眠らせておくれ♪
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby KeroGero » Sat 10.01.2005 11:18 pm

I know it's not a "real" honorific, but I've seen it used as one. For example, in Sailormoon, Mamoru often called Usagi "Usa-ko".
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Harisenbon » Sun 10.02.2005 2:48 am

SkrHgh,
I think that would be more akin to Nathan wanting to be called Nate, or Thomas Tom. I wouldn't attach ko to the end of someone's name just beacuse they were a woman.

KeroGero,
In that case, I believe that would be more of a nickname than an actual honorific.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby skrhgh3b » Sun 10.02.2005 11:49 am

SkrHgh,
I think that would be more akin to Nathan wanting to be called Nate, or Thomas Tom. I wouldn't attach ko to the end of someone's name just beacuse they were a woman.


you misunderstand me. i'm not saying it's a suffix that you can attach to any girl's name, but one that's alreadly inherent in many girl's names. i don't think it lacks any significance that it was so popular at one time to name girls with those ending in 子.
Last edited by skrhgh3b on Sun 10.02.2005 11:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
♪夢も見たくない 幸せなんか要らない
恋もしたくない お金なんか要らない
ぼくに必要な眠りを眠らせておくれ♪
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Sacari » Sun 10.02.2005 1:47 pm

This was taken from the front of a manga (the part where they explain the honourifics). I found it helpfu.

-san: this is the most common honorific, and is equivilant to Mr, Mrs, Miss etc., It is the all-purpose honorific and can be used in any situation where politness is required.
-sama: This is one level higher than "-san". It is used to confer great respect.
-dono: This comes from the word "tono", which means lord. It is even a higher level than "-sama" and confers utmost respect.
-kun: This suffix is used at the end of boys' names to express familiarity or endearment. It is alsosometimes used by men among friends , or when addressing someone younger or of lower station.
-chan: This is also used to express endearment, mostly towards girls. It is also used for little boys, pets, and evem among lovers. It gives a senseof childish cuteness."
Sempai: THis title suggests that the addressee is ones "senior" in a group or organization. It is most often used in a school setting, where underclassmen refer to their upperclassmen as "sempai".It can also be used in a workplace, such as when a newer employee addresses an emplowee who has seniority in the company.
Kohai: This is the opposite of "Sempai" and is used toward underclassmen in school or newcomers in the workplace. It connotes that the addressee is of lower station.
Sensei: Literally meaning "one who has come before", this title is used for teachers, doctors, or masters of any profession or art.
[blank]: Usually forgotten in these lists, but perhaps one of th most signifigant differences between Japanese and English. The lack of honorific means the speaker has permission to address the person in a very intimate way. Usually, only family, spouses or very close friends have this kind of permission. Known as yobisute, it can be gratifying when someone who has earned the intimacy starts to call one by one's name without an honorific. But when that intimacy hasn't been earned, it can also be very insulting.
Last edited by Sacari on Sun 10.02.2005 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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