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Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

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Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby ladyblack-mara » Tue 12.14.2010 1:41 pm

Question~
Whenever I see animes or mangas -- :hand:
(I barely know Hiragana and Katakana+ a bit grammar, so anything more difficult is out of question)-- :sweatdrop:
the protagonist always says to the person they like "suki", and it is always translated as "I love you". However, on many pages "I love you" is also translated into "daisuki" and "aishiteru"....

So what exacly is the difference??? :?:
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Re: Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby soldieroH » Tue 12.14.2010 4:51 pm

I think daisuki (だいすき) and aishiteru (あいしてる) are a bit stronger than just suki (すき). It's like saying "I like you!" or "I REALLY like you!" or "I like you very much!". :)
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Re: Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby NileCat » Wed 12.15.2010 4:37 am

Image
:)
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Re: Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby otaku oujo sama » Wed 12.15.2010 2:16 pm

aishiteru あいしてる は 大人な間で使われると思います、青年はあまり使わないと思います
参考になれば幸いです
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Re: Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby Cyborg Ninja » Wed 12.15.2010 7:33 pm

What does "blue year" mean?

"Suki" is used first in a relationship, to describe liking someone so much that you want to have a serious relationship together. "Daisuki" is similar but with more emphasis. "Aishiteru" is true love, however I only have heard it used in J dramas. I saw a news report saying that Japanese husbands rarely ever say "aishiteru" to their wives. But I suppose many marriages' passion fades after a while. "Kimi wo aishiteru" is used by a man toward a woman, and I believe "anata wo aishiteru" is used by a woman toward a man. The more interesting topic is the difference between "koi" and "ai," which are both translated as "love," but koi is a selfish love and ai is more of a selfless love.
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Re: Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby furrykef » Wed 12.15.2010 8:33 pm

Cyborg Ninja wrote:What does "blue year" mean?

青年 is "seinen" (young man), typically someone out of his teens but before middle age.

If you use Firefox or Chrome, there are add-ons such as Rikaichan that'll give you the definition of most Japanese words (using the EDICT database) when you mouseover them. It helps a ton when you just want to know what a word means. :)

Cyborg Ninja wrote:I saw a news report saying that Japanese husbands rarely ever say "aishiteru" to their wives. But I suppose many marriages' passion fades after a while.

While this may be true for some couples, I think the general reason is that the idea is, "don't say it; show it".
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Re: Difference between "suki", "daisuki" and "aishiteru"?

Postby chikara » Wed 12.15.2010 10:22 pm

furrykef wrote:
Cyborg Ninja wrote:What does "blue year" mean?

青年 is "seinen" (young man), typically someone out of his teens but before middle age.

If you use Firefox or Chrome, there are add-ons such as Rikaichan that'll give you the definition of most Japanese words (using the EDICT database) when you mouseover them. It helps a ton when you just want to know what a word means. :) .......

If you don't use an add-on such as Rikaichan you can always just look up a word in EDICT directly using WWWJDIC;

青年 【せいねん】 (n) youth; young man;

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