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Adverb Question

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Adverb Question

Postby Sachi » Mon 11.07.2005 4:30 pm

Ok, so in a sentence, I'm confused about where the adverb would go.

わたしのうちさむいです。
My house is cold.

How would I change the Japanese to say "My house is cold today"? Or what about "My house is cold inside"? (Yes, "inside" isn't an adverb in this sentence, but I would like to know that one as well... [or is it an adverb? Ack.. I feel bad for people trying to learn English as a second language x_x It really is confusing!])
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby richvh » Mon 11.07.2005 4:53 pm

今日(きょう)は私(わたし)の家(うち)が寒(さむ)いです。
Today my home is cold.

私(わたし)の家(うち)の中(なか)は寒(さむ)いです。
It's cold inside my home.

Since "uchi" usually refers to your own home, you could drop the "watashi no" entirely.

(Prepares to be corrected by those more knowledgeable.)
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby Sachi » Mon 11.07.2005 5:10 pm

Ok. Thanks, richvh :)
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby Infidel » Mon 11.07.2005 7:50 pm

Samui is a adjective not an adverb :)
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby InsanityRanch » Tue 11.08.2005 12:48 am

richvh wrote:
今日(きょう)は私(わたし)の家(うち)が寒(さむ)いです。
Today my home is cold.

私(わたし)の家(うち)の中(なか)は寒(さむ)いです。
It's cold inside my home.

Since "uchi" usually refers to your own home, you could drop the "watashi no" entirely.

(Prepares to be corrected by those more knowledgeable.)


Usually when 今日 is used as an adverb it does not get は afterwards.

今日家は寒いです。

If it is the subject, it does get は:

今日は寒いです。

Sometimes it shows up in the following weird form:

今日の富美子はうれしそうです。
Tomiko seems happy today. (Literally, today's Tomiko seems happy.)

Anyway, to answer the original question, usually a short adverb that answers the question "when" for the whole sentence comes at the beginning.

Shira
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby Harisenbon » Tue 11.08.2005 3:45 am

I would just like to point out that 今日 is also not an adverb, as it does not modify the verb.
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby InsanityRanch » Tue 11.08.2005 9:52 am

Harisenbon wrote:
I would just like to point out that 今日 is also not an adverb, as it does not modify the verb.


Really?

"Today" is an adverb in English, at least in the questioner's example sentence. (Today my house is cold.)

Is 今日 NOT an adverb in Japanese? I am just trying to get my head around *Japanese* concepts of Japanese grammar so bear with me here.

Hmmmm. My dictionary unhelpfully says けふ, which is an abbreviation for... ? Who knows. Never mind! I just realized this is the obsolete pronunciation of this compound!

JDIC calls it a n-t -- a noun of time?

The thing is, as I mention in the sentence, there is a difference when you use 今日 as a noun versus when you use it as (what in English would be) an adverb.

Shira
Last edited by InsanityRanch on Tue 11.08.2005 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby AJBryant » Tue 11.08.2005 12:15 pm

The standard rule is "an adverb modifies a VERB (or, sometimes, another adjective or adverb). It tells HOW the verb does something."

He swims. He swims WELL. "Well" is an adverb. He runs. He runs SWIFTLY. "Swiftly" is an adverb. In "he smells bad" the "bad" is an adjective, not an adverb, because it addresses his physical state, and his aroma. In "he smells badly" the "badly" is an adverb because it is describing the manner/ability of his smelling -- that is, perhaps the bloodhound has a cold.

That all being said --

"Today" is, in fact, an adverb. It modifies (or in this case, specifies the time) the verb occurs. It's just not as obvious an adverb as the others.

Tony
Last edited by AJBryant on Tue 11.08.2005 12:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby InsanityRanch » Tue 11.08.2005 2:13 pm

The English word "today" can be an adverb or a noun. Adverb: Today I went to the store. Noun: Today is March 15. (The dictionary at m-w.com tells me it can be an adjective as well, but I don't see how.)

As for the Japanese word 今日, it seems to function pretty much like the English word today, as an adverb or a noun. But for some reason, none of the Japanese dictionaries (国語辞典)I consulted listed its part of speech, except for the version of JDIC in JWPCE, which says it is a n-t. If I were feeling really curious, I could go find other n-t entries and find out what sort of words those are.

It's odd that the dictionaries DIDN'T list the part of speech. If I look up, for instance, 時々 in the same dictionary, there is an entry marked 名for noun and one marked 副 for adverb. But 今日and 昨日 say nothing about part of speech.
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby Sachi » Tue 11.08.2005 5:28 pm

Ok, so 今日 IS an adverb in this case, then? There seems to be a lot of conflict here ^.^; I looked up "today" in an English dictionary, and concluded that the way I wanted to use it was it's adverb form. I think I understand what you mean.

Also, a question about "cold". Isn't there another word for it? tsumetai (cold to the touch, freezing, ect.) That's what I got out of a dictionary. "samui" I read said "cold (weather)".
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby InsanityRanch » Tue 11.08.2005 7:02 pm

tsukiakari_emi34 wrote:
Also, a question about "cold". Isn't there another word for it? tsumetai (cold to the touch, freezing, ect.) That's what I got out of a dictionary. "samui" I read said "cold (weather)".


Yes indeed. It's 寒い天気(さむいてんき)but 冷たい飲物(つめたいのみもの).
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby nprz » Tue 11.08.2005 7:23 pm

Since many Japanese learners are confused about samui and tsumetai, there is a longer explaination here: http://www.jekai.org/entries/aa/00/ns/aa00ns04.htm.

I'm not sure if 今日 is used as an adverb in Japanese.
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby Harisenbon » Wed 11.09.2005 12:20 am

All,
heeh... I never knew that today could be an adverb. I couldn't think of what it was, but I thought that adverbs had to directly modify the verb. Guess I needed to spend more time diagramming sentences in elementary school. =)
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby AJBryant » Wed 11.09.2005 1:27 am

That's because it doesn't follow the commonly expected pattern for adverbs ("todayly" ;) ) -- bloody inconvenient, if you ask me.

Tony
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RE: Adverb Question

Postby Mukade » Wed 11.09.2005 1:28 am

InsanityRanch wrote:
(The dictionary at m-w.com tells me it can be an adjective as well, but I don't see how.)


Today's children don't learn grammar as well as their predecessors.

;)
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