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はやくしーThe 〜くし〜 Ending

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はやくしーThe 〜くし〜 Ending

Postby JoshM » Tue 12.13.2005 5:30 pm

I was watching a video in Japanese to improve my listening comprehension, when someone said: "hayakushi kotoba" (はやくし言葉) as our "tongue twisters".

はやい, as an adjective, can be changed into an adverb, OK. But how is it changed into ~くし and what role this inflection enact in the Japanese language?
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RE: はやくしーThe 〜くし〜 Ending

Postby spank » Tue 12.13.2005 6:31 pm

hmmm.....this is a tough question. I know that if you take a standard japanese adjective like 速い、it can be inflected with ku suru, to mean...."make (something) adjective".

ex. もうちょっと安くして下さいませんか?
Won't you make it a little more cheaper (for me)?

Maybe......hayaku shi 速くし is an abbreviation of "hayaku shite" = make faster.
But then again, i might just be dead wrong on this....:(
Last edited by spank on Tue 12.13.2005 6:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: はやくしーThe 〜くし〜 Ending

Postby AJBryant » Tue 12.13.2005 8:23 pm

It's not "hayakushi" -- it's 'hayakuCHI" (早口).

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RE: はやくしーThe 〜くし〜 Ending

Postby JoshM » Tue 12.13.2005 8:44 pm

Sorry and thanks.
I've thought about this, but I was uncertain. Also, I've listened to the show many times, but it really sounded as "shi", but now I've checked the kanji that Tony gave and it made sense. Sorry, sorry.
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RE: はやくしーThe 〜くし〜 Ending

Postby AJBryant » Wed 12.14.2005 10:36 am

Even if you didn't hear the "ch" clearly, the emphasis of the words should have totally cleared it up. When you're more used to hearing Japanese, you'll notice the "drop off" in emphasis on things like adverbial endings.

In a way, compare it to the title of the WW2 film "the Big Red One." Now, here, ONE is a noun -- the One, the First Division, so Big Red and One are all hit with the same emphasis. Now, pretend that the "one" is "one of several" (as in, "that apple there, not the little green one, but the big red one.") Hear the difference in how "red one" and "red one" sound? That's the kind of difference you'll start to notice.

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