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Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

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Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby Archinho » Thu 03.02.2006 6:59 pm

Do you know about Renato's trip to Peru?

Anata wa Renato no tabi e Peru wakaru?



Btw, "e Peru" is no noun, no object, no adjective (right?), in my country we call them Noun Completers, since they work like the object of a noun, so, how should i treat their position towards the noun? (trip in the above sentence)

Btw², please correct me if the above sentences are wrong or not.

Thanks a lot;
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby Oni » Thu 03.02.2006 11:22 pm

Well, my japanese if far from good, but just a few bits.
Particles go after the nouns. i.e. Peru e
I think "shiru" would be a better verb, but wakaru works too. :p

The best I got is this...
anata wa peru e iku Renato no tabi da koto ga shiru?
anata wa Renato no tabi ga Peru e da koto ga shiru?

I'm thinking the first, cause I don't know if using e without a verb is a good thing. Hope this helps at least a little.
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby richvh » Thu 03.02.2006 11:30 pm

My opinion is that it would be more like:

あなたはレナとのペルへ旅を知っていますか。(Anata wa Renato no Peru e tabi o shitte imasu ka?)
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby Mukade » Thu 03.02.2006 11:35 pm

Remember we don't usually use personal pronouns like 'you' in Japanese. Also, wakaru is more like the English 'to understand' or 'to know (the answer to a problem, etc.).' 'To know' in most other instances would be shiru. You can also use kiku the same way we use 'did you hear about...?' in English.

So, we could say:

レナトさんはペルへ行ったと聞いた。
Renato-san ha Peru he itta to kiita?
Lit., "Did you hear that Renato went to Peru?"

or

レナトさんはペルへ行ったのを知ってた。
Renato-san ga Peru he itta no wo shitteta?
Lit., "Did you know that Renato went to Peru?"

If you really want to use the word tabi, you could probably say:

レナトさんはペルの旅をしたのを知ってた。
Renato-san ha peru no tabi wo shita no wo shitteta?
Lit., "Did you know that Renato traveled Peru?"
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby Archinho » Sun 03.05.2006 2:02 am

Hmm, so, when something works like an object to a noun, i should use "no", right?

Like:


Jurei no shikata wo shiru = I know the way of life

or

Watashi wa Japan no shikata o baiku de haguta.

= I got lost by car(while driving a car) on my way to Japan.


Btw, is desu always optional?

Thx a lot man!
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby keatonatron » Sun 03.05.2006 2:59 am

Object to a noun?

When a verb gets "no" added to it, it acts like a noun.

食べる - taberu - to eat
夕食を食べる - yuushoku wo taberu - I eat dinner

食べるの - taberu no - eating
夕食を食べるのが好きだ - yuushoku wo taberu no ga suki da- Eating dinner is liked (by me)

What you're doing there is different. When using shikata, the rule is that any phrase that uses "wo" between the word and suru before conjigating will use "no" instead when it turns to shikata.

You're first sentence is right, but you're getting the concepts mixed up. The second sentence... doesn't make sense. (Shikata means "way of doing", so you said something about the way of doing Japan... And in Japanese, Japan is "Nihon")
Last edited by keatonatron on Sun 03.05.2006 3:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby Archinho » Sun 03.05.2006 10:13 am

I will try to remake it, i think the problem is that i thought that "shikata" was way, like a road (gairo right?), so, here it goes:



Shokai shi e kuru de, ginkou no gairo de haguta.

Should mean:

I got lost on the road to the bank because its the first time i come to this city.

I wonder if its correct, btw, do anyone know how we write "to wonder" in Nihongo?

Many thanks for ur help keatonatron and all the other's ones ;)
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RE: Complex Sentence (to me at least xD)

Postby Oracle » Sun 03.05.2006 11:01 am

Archinho wrote:
I will try to remake it, i think the problem is that i thought that "shikata" was way, like a road (gairo right?), so, here it goes:



Shokai shi e kuru de, ginkou no gairo de haguta.

Should mean:

I got lost on the road to the bank because its the first time i come to this city.


この町(に来たの)は初めてなので、銀行に行く途中道に迷いました。
kono machi ( ni kita no ) wa hajimete nanode, ginkou ni iku tochuu michi ni mayoimashita.

初回 does mean "first time", but it's a written word and also not used to describe everyday situations like this. Use はじめて.
途中 means "in the middle of / while doing <something>", in this case going to the bank
道に迷う is a set phrase/idiom meaning to "become lost" or "lose your way"

btw "michi" is a better choice when you want to say "road". "Gairo" is a large urban road, and it's not common in conversation, more a written term. "michi" means any sort of road/path.
Last edited by Oracle on Sun 03.05.2006 11:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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