Translation questions

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Tia
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Translation questions

Post by Tia » Sun 07.20.2008 12:26 pm

Hello :)

I have been trying to translate a text recently, and have run into some doubtful sentences along the way. I thought this would be the best place to ask for help, since I have been a lurker here for quite a while.

The first question is about what one of the characters in the text is calling a girl in his class. A few times in the text I see him referring to, and also directly calling her, "Manaita" (マナ板). This is a cutting board, right? The context seems to imply that he believes that she is manipulating the other boys in class, since they are all adoring her. I wonder how I can best translate something like that? Has it been used before?

The second question I have is about a longer sentence that I am having a hard time comprehending. The girl is talking about her math lessons:

"数学は、私があまり好きになれない授業だ。
何分、人間には向き不向きがある。私、体育なら自信あるんだけど……というか、得意すぎて浮きそう。"

The best I can get out of this, is that she's not very good at math, and that she prefers PE. I'm not too sure though. Here is my tame, guess-work translation of the second sentence:
"anyway, there are people not fit for this area. I am much more confident with PE, but------ I can say, it's likely to become my strong point."
Feel free to point and laugh.

I hope I'm not asking dumb questions in the wrong section or anything like that. Help would be much appreciated :)

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Hyperworm
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Re: Translation questions

Post by Hyperworm » Sun 07.20.2008 2:16 pm

My interpretation of the second sentence:
"Anyway, every human has things they're good at and things they aren't. I do have confidence with PE at least... in fact, I'm too good at it, I think I stand out."

For マナ板, have a look at the bottom of the Wikipedia article on it:

俗語としての用法
まな板という語は俗語として、現在のまな板の形状より転じて胸の起伏が少ないこと、いわゆる貧乳を指すことがある。
fun translation snippets | need something translated?
BTC@1KMZXgoWiDshQis5Z7feCx8jaiP4QAB2ks

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AJBryant
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Re: Translation questions

Post by AJBryant » Sun 07.20.2008 4:53 pm

This brings up a question.

In English, we have the expression "she's flat as a board." But do we actually have a connected insult? We don't call a girl "flattie" or "boardie" or anything like that. (Do we?)


Tony

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Re: Translation questions

Post by richvh » Sun 07.20.2008 5:11 pm

Closest I can think of is "flat-chested."
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Tia
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Re: Translation questions

Post by Tia » Sun 07.20.2008 6:04 pm

*Smacks forehead*

Of course! Now it's so obvious :P Thank you very much! Also for the help with the sentence. I may end up coming back and using this thread for more questions if needed :)

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Re: Translation questions

Post by AJBryant » Sun 07.20.2008 6:13 pm

richvh wrote:Closest I can think of is "flat-chested."


Yeah, that's the only think I can think of.

But think of the other things we call people based on physical attributes.

"Stringbean." "Fattie." "Butterball." "Red." "Blackie." "Freckles." "Tubbie."

Do we not have a pejorative nickname for the less-endowed females out there?


Tony (who was called "Tubbie" a few times, though he always wanted to be called "Studmuffin MacGodBody")

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Re: Translation questions

Post by spin13 » Mon 07.21.2008 3:25 am

AJBryant wrote:But think of the other things we call people based on physical attributes.
"Stringbean." "Fattie." "Butterball." "Red." "Blackie." "Freckles." "Tubbie."


And here I thought we replaced the offensive "Blackie" with the more PC "Darkie"...

AJBryant wrote:Do we not have a pejorative nickname for the less-endowed females out there?


What about "Mosquito Bite(s)"? I usually heard it in reference to the actual breasts, but it was occasionally extended to the women as well.

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Re: Translation questions

Post by chikara » Mon 07.21.2008 4:14 am

AJBryant wrote:... "Stringbean." "Fattie." "Butterball." "Red." "Blackie." "Freckles." "Tubbie." ....

"Bluey", "Biscuit", "Carrot Top"
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Re: Translation questions

Post by AJBryant » Mon 07.21.2008 8:22 am

spin13 wrote:And here I thought we replaced the offensive "Blackie" with the more PC "Darkie"...


Never saw a guy with black hair called "Darkie," though I have seen a few named "Blackie."


Tony

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Re: Translation questions

Post by becki_kanou » Mon 07.21.2008 9:17 am

Back in my middle school days the boys used to tease the flat-chested girls by calling them "a carpenter's dream" ie: flat as a board.
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。

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Re: Translation questions

Post by chikara » Tue 07.22.2008 12:07 am

becki_kanou wrote:Back in my middle school days the boys used to tease the flat-chested girls by calling them "a carpenter's dream" ie: flat as a board.

Similar to "a pirate's delight", ie "a sunken chest"
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Re: Translation questions

Post by Harisenbon » Tue 07.22.2008 1:17 am

chikara wrote:
becki_kanou wrote:Back in my middle school days the boys used to tease the flat-chested girls by calling them "a carpenter's dream" ie: flat as a board.

Similar to "a pirate's delight", ie "a sunken chest"


You guys all have such colorful descriptions. We just had "the envy of 11 year old girls everywhere"
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Re: Translation questions

Post by Tia » Tue 07.22.2008 9:41 am

There are a lot of imaginative names for that :D

Here's another question I came across in the text today. On student is talking about two other students who won't show up in class, and he says how immoral they are, and that they should study more. Then this phrase comes up:

"服装の乱れは心の乱れ"

The closest thing I can come up with is "unrest in clothes is unrest in the heart". But that sounds kind of strange, and I'm trying to come up with some better way of wording it in english. I was wondering if it is some kind of saying they have?

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Re: Translation questions

Post by becki_kanou » Tue 07.22.2008 10:08 am

Tia wrote:There are a lot of imaginative names for that :D

Here's another question I came across in the text today. On student is talking about two other students who won't show up in class, and he says how immoral they are, and that they should study more. Then this phrase comes up:

"服装の乱れは心の乱れ"

The closest thing I can come up with is "unrest in clothes is unrest in the heart". But that sounds kind of strange, and I'm trying to come up with some better way of wording it in english. I was wondering if it is some kind of saying they have?


I think in this case "disarray" comes closer than "unrest", so maybe something like: "The disarray of their uniforms reflects the disarray of their minds", although that sounds a bit pompous and literary for school kids to say...
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。

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Re: Translation questions

Post by two_heads_talking » Tue 07.22.2008 10:17 am

It is an act of defiance of authority, or "resistance to oppressive authority."
I think it means that the way you dress can also perceived as how you act..

"you act like what you wear" would be another way to put it.. That is if I am reading it properly.

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