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As you can see .....

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As you can see .....

Postby chikara » Wed 02.11.2009 12:48 am

"As you can see ....." is a phrase that is used quite commonly in English, for example "As you can see my (written) Japanese is not very good.", "As you can see this plant is dead."

Is there a Japanese phrase that has a similar meaning?

Googling I came across the phrase 見れば解るように but I'm not sure if that fits the bill.
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby becki_kanou » Wed 02.11.2009 1:34 am

How about 見ての通り or ご覧の通り?
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby chikara » Wed 02.11.2009 1:51 am

becki_kanou wrote:How about 見ての通り or ご覧の通り?

見ての通り; 見てのとおり 【みてのとおり】 (exp) as you see
ご覧の通り 【ごらんのとおり】 (exp) (hon) as you see

doh! :oops:

Thanks becki-san.
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby clay » Wed 02.11.2009 8:07 am

As you probably already know :lol: , a similar construction is ご存知の通り (or ご存知のように)

ご存知の通り【ごぞんじのとおり】 as you know...
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby two_heads_talking » Wed 02.11.2009 9:41 am

clay wrote:As you probably already know :lol: , a similar construction is ご存知の通り (or ご存知のように)

ご存知の通り【ごぞんじのとおり】 as you know...


I would have suggested this.. since the phrase "as you can see" also means "as you already know." Of course there could be debate on the actualy seeing versus knowing thing....
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby keatonatron » Wed 02.11.2009 11:17 am

two_heads_talking wrote:since the phrase "as you can see" also means "as you already know."


No it doesn't. "As you already know" means the listener already has the information being presented. "As you can see" means that the information already presented should make it easy to understand what will be said next.

"On March 12th, 2002, the number dropped from 30 to 11. As you can see, there was a significant loss in support on the day the report was published."

We didn't know that already, but it was quite easy to piece together with the information provided.
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby two_heads_talking » Wed 02.11.2009 11:46 am

keatonatron wrote:
two_heads_talking wrote:since the phrase "as you can see" also means "as you already know."


No it doesn't. "As you already know" means the listener already has the information being presented. "As you can see" means that the information already presented should make it easy to understand what will be said next.

"On March 12th, 2002, the number dropped from 30 to 11. As you can see, there was a significant loss in support on the day the report was published."

We didn't know that already, but it was quite easy to piece together with the information provided.


You're right.. I think I was think as you might know rather than already know.. Like I said, it is debatable..
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby chikara » Wed 02.11.2009 7:39 pm

keatonatron wrote:
two_heads_talking wrote:since the phrase "as you can see" also means "as you already know."

No it doesn't. "As you already know" means the listener already has the information being presented. "As you can see" means that the information already presented should make it easy to understand what will be said next.....

I agree. The context I meant is where the speaker is drawing the listeners attention to some evidence which makes what the speaker is then saying obvious.
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Re: As you can see .....

Postby Morrow » Thu 02.12.2009 12:42 am

chikara wrote: for example "As you can see my (written) Japanese is not very good.", "As you can see this plant is dead."


As far as these two examples are concerned, I don't think that there are good counterparts for them.
If you use a conjunction "as" to show a comparison or similarity, it's easy to find its friend in Japanese.
(1) a. It's a nice site, but as you said, the house could be improved. (Leech et al. 2001:52).
b. 立地は問題ないけれど、家の方は、君の言った(or 言う)通り、手を入れた方がいいかもしれないね。

When you use the same conjunction to introduce a comment clause, however, you can't always expect to verbalize the idea in the other language.
(2) a. As you know, I've always wanted to visit Greece.
b. As I've said before, you need to take a break from work. (Leech et al. 2001:89)
I can't imagine anyone will say something corresponding to "as you know" in (2a) in Japanese. The closest thing I can think of (apart from how close) is 「[私ね/僕ね]、ギリシャに一度でいいから行ってみたいと思って[たの/たんだ]」, where you are trying to draw attention to what you're going to say by choosing 「ね」. In contrast, "as I've said before" may sound less foreign, though you'll be more likely to hear "前(に)も言ったけど" than "前(に)も言った通り."

Now let's be back to your "as you can see." If you add something, generally, you can easily get what you want.

(3) a. As you can see from these examples, you can't always put anything into another language.
b. こうした例から分かる[ように/通り] (or こうした例を見ても分かる[ように/通り])、何でもかんでも外国語に移し変えることができるわけではないのです。

(4) As you can see this plant is dead.
For this, the natural Japanese will be "あれ、枯れてる." A Japanese would try to catch your attention by using something like "あれ" and expect you will be able to correctly identify (or "see") what is dead.

(5) As you can see my (written) Japanese is not very good.
This is one of the "last resort" things. It would be wise not to say something like this unless you can't help it (for example, you feel you need to be modest when compliments are showered on you). Even so, you should use "actually" instead of "as you can see."

What If you were to say it "out of the blue"?
If you actually are a good writer, you will risk sounding like a hypocrite. Your downplay requires Japanese people to follow suit: They feel compelled to do a ritual downplay and say,"とんでもない。chikaraさんの日本語はとても上手ですよ。同じぐらい英語がうまくなりたいなって思ってるくらいですから。ホント。" You pretend to put yourself one down position, forcing Japanese people to put themselves one down position in order to stand on the same footing as you do and thus save your face, which is actually not necessary. Now you will have successfully made a firm impression on their minds: ホント嫌味な人! Understatement is a sign of confidence (in your competence) in Japanese culture. Too much of it (as a result of your adding "as you can see") will have adverse repercussions.

And if you are who you say you are, it is not necessary to say "as you can see," because it is already self-evidently clear to Japanese people. If you say something you need not say in the first place, it will send a hidden message: Probably, you're crying for help because you're so embarrassed of being a poor linguist. Japanese people will rush and swarm to save you (and your face). Again.

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Re: As you can see .....

Postby chikara » Thu 02.12.2009 2:40 am

Thanks for that very detailed response.
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