Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - It could if...

It could if...

Do you have a translation question?

Re: It could if...

Postby Disco » Sat 04.18.2009 3:47 pm

*
furrykef wrote:
Disco wrote:I figured out that (at least the people I speak with ) native spanish speakers from Mexico are not too big on the subjunctive, or future ( voy a viajar instead of viajare).


I can understand how they're not big on the future tense, but how are they not big on the subjunctive? My understanding is that the use of the subjunctive doesn't vary much from region to region.

My bad;I figured out that (at least the people I speak with ) native spanish speakers from Mexico are not too big on the TEXTBOOK subjunctive ( i.e. Es dudoso que tengas seis dolares (textbook). vs. Es dudoso que tienes seis dolares [what I would normally say speaking to my freind] [ both: It is doubtful that you have 6 dollars.])
我輩はただの英国紳士でございます
User avatar
Disco
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Sat 03.28.2009 6:33 pm
Location: California
Native language: English

Re: It could if...

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Sat 04.18.2009 3:54 pm

Disco wrote:Thank You Yudan for that explanation. I learned spanish at school, and learned everything by name (i.e. subjunctive, conditional preterite) but that's not how native speakers see it.


Right -- native speakers of course have grammatical categories in their head but they often can't name or explain them. (As a side note, sometimes people mistakenly believe that if a native speaker cannot understand a grammatical explanation or doesn't know a grammatical term, that those explanations or terms are wrong.)

Also, I learned phrases that no one is familiar with (ex. me estas tomando el pelo) So talking with various native speakers I've learned which phrases to discredit and how to alter what I say to be the "normal" way instead of the "textbook" way. I figured out that (at least the people I speak with ) native spanish speakers from Mexico are not too big on the subjunctive, or future ( voy a viajar instead of viajare).


Right also; although I think "textbook language" sometimes gets an unfair criticism, it is definitely true that you're not going to find the speech of native speakers conforming 100% to what you learn in a textbook. It would be impossible to write a textbook that did that. So what you have to do is what you said; adjust your speech to what people around you are doing -- but it helps to have a textbook basis to know what you are adjusting and why.

Also, for english, I would say, " I wish I were a dog" instead of "I wish I was a dog". I do not think that is acceptable on paper though.


Did you mean this the other way around? (Statements that use the "subjunctive were" are rarely used in papers and formal writing anyway so the issue only really comes up in less formal situations and speech.)
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

Re: It could if...

Postby Disco » Sat 04.18.2009 4:18 pm

Yeah. I meant that I don't think, "I wish I were" is acceptable on paper.
我輩はただの英国紳士でございます
User avatar
Disco
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Sat 03.28.2009 6:33 pm
Location: California
Native language: English

Re: It could if...

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Sat 04.18.2009 4:34 pm

Disco wrote:Yeah. I meant that I don't think, "I wish I were" is acceptable on paper.


"I wish I were taller" is the prescriptively correct form, so if you were writing something formal that's what you would want to use (although as I said, using "I wish I..." is rare in a formal paper no matter what). "I wish I was taller" is a speech form that many people reject as incorrect.
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

Re: It could if...

Postby Disco » Sat 04.18.2009 4:37 pm

Yudan Taiteki wrote:
Disco wrote:Yeah. I meant that I don't think, "I wish I were" is acceptable on paper.


"I wish I were taller" is the prescriptively correct form, so if you were writing something formal that's what you would want to use (although as I said, using "I wish I..." is rare in a formal paper no matter what). "I wish I was taller" is a speech form that many people reject as incorrect.

Okay- thank you for the clarification.
我輩はただの英国紳士でございます
User avatar
Disco
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Sat 03.28.2009 6:33 pm
Location: California
Native language: English

Re: It could if...

Postby Disco » Sat 04.18.2009 4:41 pm

Disco wrote:How would you express that in Japanese? B could occur if A happens. For example; I could drive to the store, if I had a car. (or) I could eat if I were at home. I had been wondering how to do this, because I'm learning the conditional in both Japanese and spanish 『 Si tengo dinero, yo viajaria a Mexico(if I have money, I could travel to mexico)』also is there a WORD for "to be able to", like "can" in english or "poder" in spanish?

For MY original question, would it be; 車があるなら運転できる。& うちにいるなら食べられる?
我輩はただの英国紳士でございます
User avatar
Disco
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Sat 03.28.2009 6:33 pm
Location: California
Native language: English

Re: It could if...

Postby spin13 » Sun 04.19.2009 2:02 am

astaroth wrote:But back to Japanese. The moods are not there in the language; I use the analogy of なら、と、ば and so on as an analogy but I'm not saying they are subjunctives in any ways.

As has been said, while the Japanese language doesn't have a subjunctive mood it is still capable of expressing the same ideas. There are quite a few constructs for expressing hypothetical situations, suppositions, and volition. For example: ~しようと思う, ~したいと思う, ~したら~だろう, ~したら~のに, ~と[仮定]する, and ~[しよう]ものなら. It's also quite common to just end on a conditional and leave the rest to context.
You're probably not as smart as you think.
Unskilled and Unaware
spin13
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Wed 04.06.2005 9:38 pm
Location: Tokyo
Native language: English
Gender: Male

Previous

Return to Translation Questions or Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Dobsonpt and 5 guests