Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - Whose is that?

Whose is that?

Do you have a translation question?

Whose is that?

Postby guitarplayer7694 » Tue 05.05.2009 11:29 pm

How would "whose is that" be said? The best I could guess was あれは誰のですか, but that doesn't seem right to me
User avatar
guitarplayer7694
 
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri 11.02.2007 7:33 pm

Re: Whose is that?

Postby furrykef » Wed 05.06.2009 12:17 am

From what I understand, that's perfectly correct (though of course you may want それ rather than あれ depending on the situation).

But just to be double sure, I looked it up in my Pocket Kenkyusha dictionary. It has the example sentence "これはだれのですか" for "Whose is this?", so it's fine.

- Kef
Founder of Learning Languages Through Video Games.
Also see my lang-8 journal, where you can help me practice Japanese (and Spanish, and Italian!)
User avatar
furrykef
 
Posts: 1572
Joined: Thu 01.10.2008 9:20 pm
Native language: Eggo (ワッフル語の方言)
Gender: Male

Re: Whose is that?

Postby guitarplayer7694 » Wed 05.06.2009 12:28 am

I guess the reason it didn't seem right was that there was no word after the の, I don't think I've ever really seen that before so it kinda threw me off. Thanks for the help.
User avatar
guitarplayer7694
 
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri 11.02.2007 7:33 pm

Re: Whose is that?

Postby keatonatron » Wed 05.06.2009 8:23 am

guitarplayer7694 wrote:I guess the reason it didn't seem right was that there was no word after the の, I don't think I've ever really seen that before so it kinda threw me off. Thanks for the help.


It's fine. This construction is often used, especially if the object is already understood.

In fact, "私の" can be directly translated as "mine", and "誰の" "whose".
It sounds a little elementary to say things like "Whose jacket is this?" "It's my jacket!", and so these shortenings are common both in Japanese and English.
User avatar
keatonatron
 
Posts: 4838
Joined: Sat 02.04.2006 3:31 am
Location: Tokyo (Via Seattle)
Native language: English
Gender: Male

Re: Whose is that?

Postby guitarplayer7694 » Wed 05.06.2009 9:19 am

keatonatron wrote:
guitarplayer7694 wrote:I guess the reason it didn't seem right was that there was no word after the の, I don't think I've ever really seen that before so it kinda threw me off. Thanks for the help.


It's fine. This construction is often used, especially if the object is already understood.

In fact, "私の" can be directly translated as "mine", and "誰の" "whose".
It sounds a little elementary to say things like "Whose jacket is this?" "It's my jacket!", and so these shortenings are common both in Japanese and English.

Makes sense.
User avatar
guitarplayer7694
 
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri 11.02.2007 7:33 pm

Re: Whose is that?

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Wed 05.06.2009 9:59 am

You may already know this, but there is a noun の that is distinct from the particle, that represents a noun already known in the conversation. So you can say something like 赤いの which is like "the red one" in English. This can be used like any other noun, so you can write 赤いのです or 赤いのじゃない or whatever.

However, when you have something like 私の本 and you want to replace 本 with the noun の, the two の's contract and you're just left with 私の.

(Somewhat confusingly, the particle + noun contracts, but noun + particle doesn't. So if you want to say "In front of the red one", it's 赤いのの前.)
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

Re: Whose is that?

Postby keatonatron » Wed 05.06.2009 2:41 pm

Yudan Taiteki wrote:However, when you have something like 私の本 and you want to replace 本 with the noun の, the two の's contract and you're just left with 私の.)


Just as how "my" (私の) and "one" (の) contract to make "my'ne [mine]"!! :shock:

I've been saying it for years; Japanese is exaclty like English 8)
User avatar
keatonatron
 
Posts: 4838
Joined: Sat 02.04.2006 3:31 am
Location: Tokyo (Via Seattle)
Native language: English
Gender: Male

Re: Whose is that?

Postby guitarplayer7694 » Wed 05.06.2009 8:41 pm

Yudan Taiteki wrote:You may already know this, but there is a noun の that is distinct from the particle, that represents a noun already known in the conversation. So you can say something like 赤いの which is like "the red one" in English. This can be used like any other noun, so you can write 赤いのです or 赤いのじゃない or whatever.

However, when you have something like 私の本 and you want to replace 本 with the noun の, the two の's contract and you're just left with 私の.

(Somewhat confusingly, the particle + noun contracts, but noun + particle doesn't. So if you want to say "In front of the red one", it's 赤いのの前.)

I had reread that like five times before I actually understood what you meant.
User avatar
guitarplayer7694
 
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri 11.02.2007 7:33 pm

Re: Whose is that?

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Wed 05.06.2009 8:46 pm

That's one of my least favorite lessons to teach.
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

Re: Whose is that?

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 05.07.2009 7:50 am

keatonatron wrote:
Yudan Taiteki wrote:However, when you have something like 私の本 and you want to replace 本 with the noun の, the two の's contract and you're just left with 私の.)


Just as how "my" (私の) and "one" (の) contract to make "my'ne [mine]"!! :shock:

I've been saying it for years; Japanese is exaclty like English 8)


Yeah, in one or two cases, the rest it's more like Russian.. lol :mrgreen:
User avatar
two_heads_talking
 
Posts: 4137
Joined: Thu 04.06.2006 11:03 am
Native language: English


Return to Translation Questions or Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 6 guests

cron