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Moshigashite?

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Moshigashite?

Postby Akuma » Wed 09.14.2005 1:27 am

I was doing a google search on Google's Japanese engine, and, for those of you who have used Google, Google will sometimes make suggestions that ask "Did you mean this?" And then it will give you an alternative search.

The same thing happened when I did a Japanese search, and instead of "Did you mean this" もしがして came up.

I have a general idea of what this means, based on how it is represented in Google's English search engine, but I would like to know it's literal meaning. Also, this is a verb, right? I tried looking for the definition of "moshigasuru" but came up with nothing. Also, why is it in the "~te" form? And since this is a verb, does it have a kanji associated with it?

Thanks in advance ;).
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RE: Moshigashite?

Postby Harisenbon » Wed 09.14.2005 3:15 am

Are you sure you don't mean もしかして? As far as I know もしがして is not a word. もしかして means "by chance", "probably" or something similar.

for example
もしかして、回転寿司だろう。。
This is (probably) conveyorbelt sushi, isn't it.

I was curious, and looked up もしがして on google, and I got only 144 hits, most of which were blogs by foreigners. I think it's just a typo.
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RE: Moshigashite?

Postby Akuma » Wed 09.14.2005 5:10 am

Harisenbon wrote:Are you sure you don't mean もしかして?


Yeah, my bad. I accidently read it as もしがして. Even if I had read it correctly, it wouldn't have come up in the dictionary.

Thanks for the translation ^^. But why is it in the "~te" form?
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RE: Moshigashite?

Postby Harisenbon » Wed 09.14.2005 6:24 am

It's not a verb in te form as much as it is just a set phrase that means probably. It might be a verb that I'm not aware of, but I don't think so. I think it's just coincidence, much like 気晴らし looks like it should be an adjective, but isn't.
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RE: Moshigashite?

Postby CviCvraeVtMoriar » Wed 09.14.2005 11:12 pm

It might have been made after the analogy of the -te verb form.

In English, there are many adjectives that look to be perfect passive participles of verbs, and, yet, the verbs, that would correspond to these participles, are either non-existent or have been outmoded and phased out of common use. You might call these "spurious ppp's"........... if you were an idiot like me. ;)

I can't think of any examples at the moment.

'Fordo' ( or 'Foredo' ) is sort-of an example. The verb 'fordo' is no longer commonly used and is quite archaic. However, its perfect passive participle is still used:

"I was quite fordone by the heat."
Last edited by CviCvraeVtMoriar on Wed 09.14.2005 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Moshigashite?

Postby Kates » Thu 09.15.2005 10:53 am

It's like, in English, just because a word ends with -ly doesn't make it an adverb.

Adverbs: Quickly, slowly, excessively, happily, etc
Not: hourly (it can act as an adj. as in "hourly wage"), Wally ^_^, lily... I can't think of anything better. ):
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