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Postby Nebby4T » Tue 11.22.2005 11:28 pm

I have to do I project for Japanese and I need to know how do say someone is more "something" than "something."

Ex. Sarah is cuter than kittens.
Ex. Galen is more fun than puppies.

Can someone help me?
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RE: More than

Postby mandolin » Wed 11.23.2005 12:34 am

See if this site helps you out.

Scroll to the section titled "Using 「より」 for comparisons". I'd just retype a summary, but I am too lazy, and I think they did a pretty good job over there...
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RE: More than

Postby Superflat Monogram » Wed 11.23.2005 12:55 am

ahhh, this is like a comparison thing isnt it? We covered this last week in japanese class. Im sure the more experienced members on this forum can back me up on this and give other suggestions, but what i learnt was this;

...........のほうが...........より..............です。

"subject" no hou ga "subject" yori "adjective" desu.




so for the "sarah is cuter than kittens" you could say;

サラさんのほうがこねこよりきれいです。

Sarah-san no hou ga koneko yori kawaii/kirei desu.



The important thing here is the "no hou ga", because whatever you attach to that will be the main focus of your comparison. So keep that in mind.
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RE: More than

Postby Nebby4T » Wed 11.23.2005 1:19 am

Thank you, but that site confused me a lot.

I remember leaning about "no hou ga" in second year, but it didn't seem like it would be the right thing to use in this situation. The sentence about Galen is the one I need for class, but I put two examples so maybe I would get a better idea of how to do it.
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RE: More than

Postby Superflat Monogram » Wed 11.23.2005 1:53 am

I dont see why the "no hou ga" method would be a valid choice in this case, obviously there are others but its entirely up to you how you want to construct the sentence.

lol, for me though i'd stick with the "no hou ga" method.

Whats galen? the greek anatomist? or something completely different?

anyways...

ガレンさんのほうがこいぬより楽しいです。

galen-san no hou ga koinu yori tanoshii desu.
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RE: More than

Postby Kates » Wed 11.23.2005 10:11 am

Actually, you can write it without the 'no hou ga' part:

サラさんは子猫よりかわいいです。
ゲーレンさんは子犬より楽しい/面白いです。 (I still haven't quite figured out the difference between 'tanoshii' and 'omoshiroi'... -_- )
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RE: More than

Postby Superflat Monogram » Wed 11.23.2005 10:28 am

(I still haven't quite figured out the difference between 'tanoshii' and 'omoshiroi'... -_- )


Their literal meaning? or something else?

to me, something that is "fun/enjoyable", and something that is "interesting" are just completley different from each other in terms of meaning.
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RE: More than

Postby Kates » Wed 11.23.2005 10:39 am

I suppose I mean "something else." It seems to me that there is a subtle difference between these words that is... well, it's like "Japanese thinking" instead of "American thinking".... Let's see if I can explain better than that... -_-

'Omoshiroi' is often used where an English-speaker might say 'fun.' As in "Yuuenchi ha omoshiroi desu." (Amusement parks are fun.) Or even 'funny'--"Sono bangumi ha omoshiroi desu." (That TV show is funny.) Why not use 'tanoshii'? Or, if you do... does the meaning of what you are saying change slightly? In my mind, 'tanoshii' seems closer to 'fun' and 'funny'... but I often hear sentences like these expressed with 'omoshiroi'.

I once asked a Japanese friend what the difference was between "shiawase" and "ureshii" (both can mean 'happy' in English). I was told that "shiawase" is a 'long kind of happy' where "ureshii" is more short-term. I wonder if the words 'tanoshii' and 'omoshiroi' have a similar relationship...?

<_< Am I making sense...?
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RE: More than

Postby kempokatt » Wed 11.23.2005 11:00 am

I think you've hit the nail on the head Kates.

From the example sentences I've read that use those two words this is what I've understood (these are generalizations):

Omoshiroi is more "FUNNY" - HaHa funny, Wildly Funny, Your reflex (gut) reaction to something... a short term fun/funny/enjoy, it's fun and then it's over.
Tanoshii is more "FUN" - Delightful, a good time, your feelings toward something... a longer term of fun/enjoyment a little deeper/more thoughtful.

I could be wrong...I'll ask around and see what native speakers have to say.
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RE: More than

Postby Superflat Monogram » Wed 11.23.2005 11:24 am

kempokatt wrote:
I think you've hit the nail on the head Kates.

From the example sentences I've read that use those two words this is what I've understood (these are generalizations):

Omoshiroi is more "FUNNY" - HaHa funny, Wildly Funny, Your reflex (gut) reaction to something... a short term fun/funny/enjoy, it's fun and then it's over.
Tanoshii is more "FUN" - Delightful, a good time, your feelings toward something... a longer term of fun/enjoyment a little deeper/more thoughtful.

I could be wrong...I'll ask around and see what native speakers have to say.


hmmm...Im gonna ask a friend about "omoshiroi" passing off as being funny because i dont see it that way at all, unless its one of those "japanese logic" situations where one word can share the same meaning as another.

I take things more literal, so when you said "Sono bangumi ha omoshiroi desu", i didnt see it as being funny but more interesting. I would rather use the adjective "Kokkei" (*this is "na" type adjective - "kokkei na" ) for something that is funny or amusing. Its just my personal preference.

そのばんぐみはこっけいです.------------sono bangumi wa kekkoi desu
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RE: More than

Postby kempokatt » Wed 11.23.2005 11:52 am

Omoshiroi can be "interesting" but it's actually used more for "funny"...from what I've seen anyway.

you can describe a mystery novel and a comedy manga with "Omoshiroi". It's all about context.
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RE: More than

Postby Nebby4T » Wed 11.23.2005 12:33 pm

So, Galen no hou ga koinu yori tanoshii desu would work?

Thanks for your help.
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RE: More than

Postby kempokatt » Wed 11.23.2005 1:52 pm

According to my friend (native speaker) this is the breakdown...

面白い - omoshiroi 1.funny 2.interesting
楽しい - tanoshii 1.fun 2.pleased

example sentence:

最近の漫才は面白いけど、楽しめないよ。

The recent comedians are funny but not enjoyable.
- The comedians are funny, but I don't have a good time.
- They are funny, but it's not fun/pleasant.
(or something like that.)
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RE: More than

Postby Kates » Wed 11.23.2005 2:35 pm

Your sentence is good... but is uses "tanoshimu" instead of "tanoshii"... which, I mean, kind of isn't the same thing... but I understand the difference in meanings in the sentence.

I would translate it something like: "The recent comedians are funny, but I don't/can't enjoy them (their humor)." ( Since is says 'tanoshiMENAI' ) In the sentence, 'omoshiroi' seems to mean that generally the comedians are found funny; and then 'tanoshimu' is used to mean the speaker's own personal enjoyment.

But... would 最近の漫才は楽しいけど、楽しめないよ。 make sense as well...? Is there a difference between this and your original? (To be honest, I normally don't hear people as being refered to as 'tanoshii'...)
Last edited by Kates on Wed 11.23.2005 2:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: More than

Postby kempokatt » Wed 11.23.2005 4:23 pm

楽しい is used more for situations or activities that are fun/enjoyable/pleasing (or not fun... as in the example sentence).

Reading books, telling jokes, watching tv with friends etc.

面白い is used for actual people or things.

The actual book or story, the actual joke, the actual TV show being watched (or the actual friend)...etc.

Or at least that's the impression I get.

So, I don't think you could say that a comedian is 楽しい. But you could say that they are fun 楽しい to be around or that going to see a comedian perform is 楽しい, because you're saying you find it to be an enjoyable activity or situation.

Ah, Japanese, you are so elusive and vague. ;)

OH and as for こっけい (kokkei) that means more like - humorous/humorousness (in general). It doesn't mean "funny" literally.
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