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三つ子

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三つ子

Postby juddcarlos2003 » Wed 05.30.2007 10:55 pm

How does 三つ子の魂百まで translate into:
The child is father to the man.

Wouldn't the sentence translate into something like... The triplet's soul goes as far as a hundred? I'm completely confused... :(

Same goes for 三人よれば文じゅのちえ which translates into "two heads are better than one"... 何だ?!

それ諺はどんな意味?
I appreciate any replies.
またね
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RE: 三つ子

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Wed 05.30.2007 10:57 pm

These are not word-for-word translations, they are equivalent sayings.
Last edited by Yudan Taiteki on Wed 05.30.2007 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby juddcarlos2003 » Wed 05.30.2007 11:02 pm

What exactly do you mean by "equivalent sayings"? (and don't stay up too late! Its 11PM here in Florida!)
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RE: 三つ子

Postby Infidel » Wed 05.30.2007 11:10 pm

Equivalent sayings means that there are two sayings in both languages that mean the same thing, but when translated literally would make no sense at all in the other language.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby Oracle » Wed 05.30.2007 11:15 pm

They're the closest equivalent saying we have in English which expresses the same idea as the Japanese proverb.

3人よれば文殊の知恵 literally means "Three people get together, wisdom of Monju"

(Monju was ( I believe ) a very smart priest or someone similar in Japanese history. ) anyway the basic idea is the same as the English "Two heads are better than one"
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RE: 三つ子

Postby a_iwai » Thu 05.31.2007 4:00 am

"文殊(monjyu)"is an abbreviation of "文殊菩薩(monjyubosatsu)" or "文殊師利菩薩 (monjyusyuribosatsu)". "文殊菩薩(monjyubosatsu)" is one of the bodhisattva in Buddhism. He represents wisdom and intelligence.

三つ子の魂百まで(も)
"Three years old child's soul remain to 100 years old."

"The character of when he was three years old child doesn't change even if he will grow up to the age of one hundred years."

Recently it was reported that environment around children were quite important. Because children established almost all of their own characters, until they were grown up to 3 years old.

So, now this proverb might be often used to express for "we need to rear children with love".
Last edited by a_iwai on Thu 05.31.2007 11:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby juddcarlos2003 » Thu 05.31.2007 11:04 am

okay... thanks for the replies! I kind of understand... its like one of those spanish jokes that don't make sense in English...

(like diciendo: estoy muerto de hambre) ;)

thanks!
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RE: 三つ子

Postby AJBryant » Thu 05.31.2007 11:55 am

I kind of understand... its like one of those spanish jokes that don't make sense in English...


Well, maybe....

Think of the English saying "Even Homer sometimes nods." If I were to translate this into Japanese, I'd have to explain who Homer is, and what the concept implies. Fortunately, the Japanese have their own equivalent: 弘法にも筆の誤り (こうぼうにもふでのあやまり). Kobo-Daishi was a Buddhist priest who is sort of the patron saint of calligraphy, and the saying implies that even Kobo slipped in his calligraphy from time to time and made a mistake. Thus the equivalent to "Even Homer sometimes nods."

Many kotowaza have English proverb parallels:
猫に小判 = Pearls before swine
言わぬが花 = Silence is golden
紺屋の白袴 = The cobbler's sons have no shoes
蛙の子は蛙 = Like father, like son.

Some have entered into English usage:
出る釘は打たれる = The nail that sticks up will be hammered down

But most are just... well, they need explanation.
残り物には福がある "There is luck in the ones left till last"
大同小異 "Differences are overshadowed by similarities"
油を売る "To sell oil (meaning = to waste time talking)."

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RE: 三つ子

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Thu 05.31.2007 4:05 pm

猫に小判 = Pearls before swine


Although 豚に真珠 is used as well.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby juddcarlos2003 » Thu 05.31.2007 4:26 pm

Those are some "to keep" proverbs, Tony! Thanks! I especially like the kanji of this one: 大同小異 "Differences are overshadowed by similarities"
Thats funny

and whats "弘法" in 弘法にも筆の誤り? I can't find it...

Thanks
Last edited by juddcarlos2003 on Thu 05.31.2007 4:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Thu 05.31.2007 4:34 pm

Tony already explained that; Kobo-Daishi.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby juddcarlos2003 » Thu 05.31.2007 4:41 pm

Okay... so Kobou is his name... sorry.
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RE: 三つ子

Postby HeyItsMatt » Thu 05.31.2007 5:45 pm

Infidel wrote:
Equivalent sayings means that there are two sayings in both languages that mean the same thing, but when translated literally would make no sense at all in the other language.


Unrelated, but I want to live where you live, Infidel.
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