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Kanji references ^_^

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Kanji references ^_^

Postby leylia » Mon 02.28.2005 10:43 am

konnichiwa desu no ^_^

Im a newbie and would like to study japanese writing particularly in Kanji. Does anyone know a good kanji study material I can download on the internet? I mean there are thousands of kanji characters but where should we start?
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RE: Kanji references ^_^

Postby Daisuke » Mon 02.28.2005 10:55 am

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RE: Kanji references ^_^

Postby leylia » Mon 02.28.2005 11:19 am

kanjigold doesnt work on my machine cause Im using xp. T_T

Anyways, Im looking for a kanji list document such as pdf or doc so that I can print them and study them offline ^_^
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RE: Kanji references ^_^

Postby Daisuke » Mon 02.28.2005 11:27 am

I'm sorry...

I got a great PDF i am using for my own offline studies. It's a list of the first 1000 Kanji. Do you want it?
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RE: Kanji references ^_^

Postby clay » Mon 02.28.2005 11:54 am

I also have 3 PDFs for the first 1000 kanji here:
http://www.thejapanesepage.com/kanji/index.php
(go to the bottom of the page - one for 4 kyuu, 3 kyuu, and 2 kyuu)

There are a few errors, but you are free to print these out.

Once I get the kanji database more filled, i will create PDFs for download and make more printable pages.
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RE: Kanji references ^_^

Postby Mukade » Mon 02.28.2005 11:10 pm

As far as how to go about studying the kanji:

There are many ways to tackle kanji. Some people like to follow the order that they Japanese themselves study them in school. Go here for a list of kanji by grade:
http://japanese.about.com/blkodarchives.htm

-The good thing about this method is that the kanji tend to be fairly simple at first, and gradually get more difficult.
-One drawback to this method is that there isn't much thematic structure to the order that the Japanese Ministry of Education chose for these kanji (at least, none that I can devise).

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Other people like to study the most frequently-used kanji first. There are frequency lists out there, like this one:
http://nozaki-lab.ics.aichi-edu.ac.jp/nozaki/asahi/kanji.html
**(this page is ISO-2022 encoded, so set your browser accordingly)


-The good thing about this system is that you'll be seeing the kanji you're learning over and over on billboards, on TV, in books and newspapers, etc. This will continually reinforce what you are studying.
-One bad thing about frequency lists is that they are typically compiled from the Japanese used in newspapers, so there tends to be an emphasis on highly specialized political and economic lingo.

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Still other people (like myself) like to study the kanji by learning their radicals, and then learning how those radicals come together to make meaning. There are several books out there that teach kanji in this way (no websites, as far as I know), just a couple of which are:

A Guide to Remembering the Japanese Characters by Kenneth Henshall
Kanji ABC by Andreas Foerster and Naoko Tamura
Remembering the Kanji by James Heisig

A sample from Heisig's book has been posted on the web in PDF format at:
http://www.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_1.htm
**(just look for the super-fine print at the very bottom of the page


-This method is very systematic, and stresses the combination of kanji with mnemonic devices to facilitate learning.
-The drawback to this system is that you will find yourself studying many obscure kanji along with the regular, daily-use ones.

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You should think about how you learn, and choose a system best suited to you.

Whatever system you decide to use, however, I would strongly recommend that you always study kanji (or any Japanese word, for that matter) from ENGLISH to Japanese. That is, if you have a flashcard with the Japanese word or kanji on one side and the English meaning on the other, ALWAYS look at the English and try to remember the Japanese.

It's always easier to recognize a Japanese word or kanji and remember the English meaning. The hard part is thinking of the English and remembering the Japanese. If you learn it that way, then Japanese-English will follow as a matter of course.


Hope this helps. And good luck! ;)
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