Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Have a Question about some Grammar point? Share it with the world!

Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Akira Sakuma » Sat 09.24.2005 8:44 pm

I was watching Azumanga Daioh the other week and noticed a weird panda drawing in a notebook and it said: "ポたト" (po-ta-to). How come there is Hiragana in the middle of it? Shouldn't it be: "ポタト"?

:) /me tries not to look stupid.
User avatar
Akira Sakuma
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat 09.24.2005 8:18 pm

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Gaijinian » Sat 09.24.2005 9:02 pm

good show;)
The harder they come, the harder they fall, one and all.
---
yawr.org
Gaijinian
 
Posts: 232
Joined: Sat 03.05.2005 6:22 pm

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Akira Sakuma » Sat 09.24.2005 9:29 pm

*facepalms* Oh thank you for answering my question. Someone please?
baka is the flavor of the day!
User avatar
Akira Sakuma
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat 09.24.2005 8:18 pm

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Harisenbon » Sat 09.24.2005 10:41 pm

It should be, but words (or parts of words) are often put into katakana to show emphasis, much like italics are used in English.

Conversely, katakana words can sometimes be put into hiragana to show emphasis.
Want to learn Japanese the right way? How about for free?
Ippatsu // Japanesetesting.com
User avatar
Harisenbon
 
Posts: 2964
Joined: Tue 06.14.2005 3:24 am
Location: Gifu, Japan
Native language: (poor) English

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Akira Sakuma » Sat 09.24.2005 11:14 pm

Can you give me some samples and explanations?B)
baka is the flavor of the day!
User avatar
Akira Sakuma
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat 09.24.2005 8:18 pm

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Supergrunch » Sun 09.25.2005 8:31 am

Was it referring to the plant potato?- because I remember seeing that written as ポテト, which is a better approximation of the English word.
Supergrunch
 
Posts: 72
Joined: Thu 08.18.2005 11:15 am

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby ryuubu » Wed 10.05.2005 12:20 am

Maybe he's just a dumb panda.

You see Katakana and Hiragana together in slang verbs like タクる which (more so around kansai) means to take a taxi.

Also えーと often uses the 長音 mark which is usually used only with katakana.
ryuubu
 
Posts: 140
Joined: Fri 09.09.2005 4:12 am

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Mukade » Wed 10.05.2005 7:36 am

The panda is probably just "misspelling" the word because, well, he's a PANDA!

It's like the ads they had in the States where the cows are trying to get you to go to Chick-fil-a, and they're painting "Ete mor chiken" (with the "k" backwards) on billboards.
User avatar
Mukade
 
Posts: 775
Joined: Fri 02.18.2005 3:30 am
Location: Osaka
Native language: English
Gender: Male

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby Kates » Wed 10.05.2005 9:11 am

Akira: The real way to write potato in katakana is POTETO (ポテト), as SuperGrunch said. Perhaps it's some sort of word play--but I'm not sure what potato could mean/imply in Japanese. =/

Reading manga, I come across a lot of words that are written in katakana when they are normally written in hiragana. Especially words like "NANI" and "OMAE," words that are often spoken with emphasis.

I have also seen a few words written in both hira- and katakana, which was your original question, right? ^^ The one I see most often (and almost ALWAYS written this way) is:
BARERU (バレる) - "to come out/be discovered/found out"
My dictionary has it as: ばれる (with no kanji root)--but every time I see it in this manga I read, it is always バレた (I've been found out). I suppose it's just adding some emphasis to the word.
User avatar
Kates
 
Posts: 472
Joined: Fri 08.12.2005 3:54 pm

RE: Hiragana and Katakana in one word?

Postby InsanityRanch » Wed 10.05.2005 9:47 am

As many have said, when a verb or adjective is written in katakana, the root is often written in katakana and the okurigana in hiragana. e.g., バレた

Another use I've seen katakana put to (in manga particularly) is to write a word that could be written in kanji but that the author prefers not to write that way. Or at least that was how I interpreted it, but I don't remember examples.

Also, Imperial declarations used to use katakana for particles for some reason.

In general, how to write a word can be a major puzzle for foreigners. JWPCE (Breen's dictionary) provides kanji, often several possible sets of kanji, for many words that are generally written in hiragana, so it's great for looking up weird forms you come across but not so great for figuring out standard usage. And individual authors hae quirks -- they like odd spellings sometimes. I tend to go by the reibun in my electronic dictionary because that is the best guide I have to "standard" spelling.

As for ポたト

I'd guess it's a small joke, but I have no idea what makes it funny...

Shira
"Give me a fruitful error any time, full of seeds, bursting with its own corrections. You can keep your sterile truth for yourself." -- Vilfredo Pareto
InsanityRanch
 
Posts: 227
Joined: Tue 04.19.2005 2:17 pm


Return to Grammar Questions and Problems

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests

cron