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Omusubi/Onigiri and Sushi

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Omusubi/Onigiri and Sushi

Postby xhilononi234 » Fri 10.19.2007 5:38 pm

Hi, does anyone know if there are any good western fillings for omusubi/onigiri and sushi? In Japan there are pickled plums, fish roe and various fish but, there is no market close to me that sells specialty Asian food items. Sure, my local grocery store has SOME, but not many kinds.

What should the texture of nori and sushi rice be? I've tried it from the store but, it had been refrigerated for a few hours so the rice was a bit hard and the nori seemed sticky and chewy.

-どうもありがとう
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RE: Omusubi/Onigiri and Sushi

Postby two_heads_talking » Mon 10.22.2007 10:18 am

nori in sheets should be flexible and dry. and it shoudln't be sticky at all.

Nori (laver). Pressed and used for sushi rolls, most Americans are familiar with nori. In Japan, the red algae (which turns green-black when dried) is the most popular edible seaweed, and has been cultivated since ancient times.

Although nori is harvested and sold in the United States, local companies sell it in loose, dried "leaves" rather than sheets.

Nori has the highest amount of protein of the sea vegetables. It's also high in vitamins A, C and B-1. The flavor of local nori is slightly salty and a bit sweet. It's best when toasted, which helps to break down the tough consistency. To toast nori, place it in a 300-degree oven for 5 minutes, making sure it doesn't burn. Try tossing it in a quinoa salad or sprinkling it over eggs.



sushi rice can be made from any of the Japanese style rices (the more expensive types will net the best flavor, and I do believe there are some types specifically cultivated for sushi only) with sushi vinegar (sushi-zu) by mixing rice vinegar, sugar, and salt in a small pan.
Put the pan on low heat and heat until the sugar dissolves. Cool the vinegar mixture.
Spread the hot steamed rice into a large plate (if you have it, use a wooden bowl called sushi-oke) by shamoji (spatula). Sprinkle the vinegar mixture over the rice and fold the rice by shamoji very quickly. Be careful not to smash the rice.
To cool and remove the moisture of the rice well, use a fan as you mix sushi rice. This will give sushi rice a shiny look. It's best to use sushi rice right away.
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RE: Omusubi/Onigiri and Sushi

Postby Oyaji » Tue 10.23.2007 9:25 pm

xhilononi234 wrote:
Hi, does anyone know if there are any good western fillings for omusubi/onigiri and sushi? In Japan there are pickled plums, fish roe and various fish but, there is no market close to me that sells specialty Asian food items. Sure, my local grocery store has SOME, but not many kinds.


One of the most popular fillings for onigiri in Japanese convenience stores is canned tuna mixed with mayonnaise. Can't get much easier than that. ;)
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RE: Omusubi/Onigiri and Sushi

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Tue 10.23.2007 9:30 pm

Cooked salmon is popular too.
-Chris Kern
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