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i think they should make an article on...

Postby caseclosed » Sun 09.25.2005 10:15 am

the differnt types of...what would the be called...titles i guess, like chan, san,kun,sama, http://www.thejapanesepage.com/forum/vi ... ?f=7&t=715 my topic in which igot some answears but i really think there should be a part on this site that names them all
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Christian_ » Sun 09.25.2005 12:57 pm

According to my book "Japanese Grammar" it says the title san is used for saying Mr. and Ms. and is commonly used, and young childrens first names then chan are used so like EX: for a young person I guess it would be like [first name] chan and if he was older it would be whatever his[ last name] was then san. Sama is for saying san to multiple people and I THINK kun is for little girls. And Sensei is for teachers, or anyone who is a professional. Personally I Would just call the person san. Wouldnt want to come off as a jerk. Hope that helps. ( oh yeah maybe someone with a little more expertise could verify if this is 100% accurate.):)
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Supergrunch » Sun 09.25.2005 2:33 pm

The grammatical term for them is honourifics, and there are loads of them, including antiquated ones that may be used to give a particular feel.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Daichi » Mon 09.26.2005 5:55 am

Kurisuchan, I think -kun and -chan are the other way round,
ie. -chan is used when addressing girls and -kun for boys.

It's also more complicated than simply choosing which honorific to use depending on a persons age. There are further matters of status and politeness etc.

Although -san is a fail-safe that is used in all situations, I believe.
Last edited by Daichi on Mon 09.26.2005 5:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Kates » Mon 09.26.2005 8:52 am

-chan (ちゃん) is typically for girls or very young children of either sex. -chan can also be used between friends--my friend Madoka used to be called Ma-chan by her friends for a long time; parents might call their kids -chan for several years

-kun (君/くん) is typically used for young boys, but I have heard it used with girls too, but rarely--it is also used by an older man talking to a younger (esp. in work situations--ie: a boss talking to a young employee)

-sama (様/さま) is VERY respectful--I doubt you would use this at all on a daily basis--employees would NOT call their boss blahblah-sama--The emperor is a -sama, royalty in ancient times was -sama--so the word implies great respect and politeness-- One thing, though, when addressing a letter or postcard, you should write NAME-SAMA, not -san, it's just the way the Japanese do it

-san (さん) is very neutral and polite--it is best practice to call people -san until you are asked not to (You: Tanaka-san, ogenki desu ka? Tanaka: Tanaka de ii desu. (Just 'Tanaka' is fine.))

-sensei (先生/せんせい) is for teachers and a few other professionals (I know doctors for certain--you can call your doctor 'sensei')--I believe martial arts teachers are called 'sensei'-- It implies that the person you are talking to has more knowledge about 'said area' than you--'Sensei' is one of the only honorifics that can be used without a name attached to it (ie: You can simply say "Sensei"... but you couldn't just say "chan" or "sama" to someone)
Last edited by Kates on Mon 09.26.2005 8:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby caseclosed » Mon 09.26.2005 3:09 pm

i didnt ask for the meanings but they r appreciated, i want some1 to make an article on, i relize now that i put this post in the wrong board
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby caseclosed » Mon 09.26.2005 3:20 pm

how 'bout Sempai?
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Kates » Mon 09.26.2005 3:50 pm

I realized you were asking for an article, but I didn't feel like writing one, so I just wrote it here. :P

-senpai/sempai (先輩/せんぱい) is one who is a senior to the speaker--whether it regards school or work or whatever

-kouhai (後輩/こうはい) is one who is a junior to the speaker--it is the 'opposite' of "senpai"--again, applies to work, school, and other situations


You know... if you're asking about these... I have a feeling you already know what they mean... -_-
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Supergrunch » Mon 09.26.2005 4:00 pm

You've missed out -dono and you could try the rare ones like -ue. Not trying to degrde your work or anything; just giving pointers. :)
Last edited by Supergrunch on Mon 09.26.2005 4:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby caseclosed » Mon 09.26.2005 4:14 pm

i guess i might write an article off what other people gave me, ill of coarse give them credit
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Mariya » Mon 09.26.2005 4:46 pm

There has already been a thread on this, but it's way far back so I wouldn't expect anyone to search that far. Also, Kates' explanation is top-notch. :)
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby skrhgh3b » Mon 09.26.2005 4:59 pm

now, i want to know what ~shi means. i watched the drama densha otoko this weekend, and densha otoko's otaku friends kept calling him 'yamada-shi,' and that's something i've never heard before. granted, i'm not up to speed on japanese geek speak. i had to look up 'moe' a couple of minutes ago.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby caseclosed » Mon 09.26.2005 6:29 pm

i agree, Kates is the best ive gotten
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby Harisenbon » Mon 09.26.2005 7:37 pm

-shi(氏/し) is a suffix often used in news articles, or when speaking to a high ranking private citizen. For example, whenever Bill Gates is in the news, he is referred to as ゲイツ氏.
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RE: i think they should make an article on...

Postby skrhgh3b » Mon 09.26.2005 7:43 pm

Harisenbon wrote:
-shi(氏/し) is a suffix often used in news articles, or when speaking to a high ranking private citizen. For example, whenever Bill Gates is in the news, he is referred to as ゲイツ氏.



hey, thanks for the reply. i actually learned something. so, i wonder if 〜shi is an ironic title among otakus or something. i get the jokes about shibuya slang, but the akihabara stuff just goes right over my head (^^;
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