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Baseball terms

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Baseball terms

Postby katafei » Tue 01.01.2008 12:52 pm

I was thinking about posting this question in Hatori's thread, but I decided to make a new one after all.
In my vocab list there are some baseball terms I don't quite understand, even though I do know a little bit about baseball....

見送る = 'to let a pitch go by'.
This one I think I understand: it's when the batter doesn't swing because he's hoping for a free run, right? "four balls", can't think of the English term right now.

引っ張る = 'to pull the ball'
This, I have no idea what it means?
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby richvh » Tue 01.01.2008 1:36 pm

katafei wrote:
I was thinking about posting this question in Hatori's thread, but I decided to make a new one after all.
In my vocab list there are some baseball terms I don't quite understand, even though I do know a little bit about baseball....

見送る = 'to let a pitch go by'.
This one I think I understand: it's when the batter doesn't swing because he's hoping for a free run, right? "four balls", can't think of the English term right now.


You're thinking of a walk.

引っ張る = 'to pull the ball'
This, I have no idea what it means?[/quote]

When you "pull" the ball, you're trying for a home run, rather than just a base hit ("meating" the ball, or is that "meeting" the ball?)
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby katafei » Tue 01.01.2008 1:49 pm

A 'walk', that's the one!
and I prefer 'maeting' the ball ^_^


Thanks, Rich.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby Shirasagi » Tue 01.01.2008 3:05 pm

When a bat is swung, it describes a semi-circle in relation to the incoming ball. When the ball is hit with the bat at a 90 degree angle to the incoming pitch, it will go straight back in the direction it came (toward the pitcher). If it's hit with the bat somewhere between 0 and 90 degrees, it will go off in the direction opposite the batter (e.g., toward left field if the batter is left-handed). This is known in baseball as "inside-outing" or "slapping" the ball, "going the other way", or "hitting to the opposite field." If the ball is hit at a 91-180 degree angle, the ball will go to the same side of the field that the batter is on. This is known as "pulling" the ball. It doesn't mean the batter is trying to hit a home run (batters try to pull the ball when there's a runner on second so that even if they ground out the runner will advance). However, most homeruns are "pulled" because a swung bat will reach it's greatest speed at or after the 90 degree point, and due to the shape of baseball outfields, the distance to the fences is shortest on the same side that the batter is batting (left field for a right-handed batter, right field for a left-handed batter).

見送る in Japanese means "to see off, to send off", and thus is used in the sense of "waiting and seeing" before making a decision. So, when batters 見送る a pitch, they are waiting and seeing for before trying to hit a pitch. In English, this is known as "taking a pitch". Batters do this if it's a pitch they don't want to swing on. Often this is because the ball is out of the strike-zone (thus, a "ball", and four balls is a "walk"). But it can also be in the strike zone (and thus, a "strike"), and the batter let's it go by either because he doesn't think he can make good contract with it, or he just wants to see a pitch and get a feel for the pitcher.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby katafei » Tue 01.01.2008 3:44 pm

Great, thanks!

Now when I learn these words, I'll have an actual picture in my mind of what they mean ^_^

(I love baseball!)
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby two_heads_talking » Wed 01.02.2008 11:34 am

shirasagi, I like your explanation, except that you fail to mention where the angle is originating. normally it's right to left where 0 is the right and 180 is the left. (yeah, I am nitpicking, but being a batting fan, it's all in the details)

and pulling as mentioned is simply swinging early.. while pushing is swinging late. a right-handed batter swinging early will place the ball between center and left field while a left-handed batter swinging early will place the ball between center and right field. swinging late will have the opposite condition.


some of the best batters around can control where they place the ball by swinging early or late to place the ball somewhere that a defender (fielder) is not. It's easier in softball to place the ball than in baseball, but that's another discussion altogether.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby Shirasagi » Thu 01.03.2008 2:05 am

two_heads_talking wrote:
shirasagi, I like your explanation, except that you fail to mention where the angle is originating. normally it's right to left where 0 is the right and 180 is the left. (yeah, I am nitpicking, but being a batting fan, it's all in the details)


Ah, and from this I see that you are right-handed. :)

Perhaps it's best to say that 0 is the catcher-side, and 180 is the pitcher-side.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 01.03.2008 11:38 am

ACTUALLY, I hit both. I have more power batting right-handed, but I have more control batting left-handed. I am used to teaching and speaking to right handed batters, so that's how I usually address who I am speaking to.

I actually like to bat right handed on my first bat, then depeding on the pitcher, I will bat whichever handed I think will best put him at a disadvantage.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby katafei » Thu 01.03.2008 1:35 pm

two_heads_talking wrote:
shirasagi, I like your explanation, except that you fail to mention where the angle is originating. normally it's right to left where 0 is the right and 180 is the left. (yeah, I am nitpicking, but being a batting fan, it's all in the details)

^_^
I had already noticed shirasagi's point of view was left-handed,
and pulling as mentioned is simply swinging early.. while pushing is swinging late. a right-handed batter swinging early will place the ball between center and left field while a left-handed batter swinging early will place the ball between center and right field. swinging late will have the opposite condition.

so I had understood the mechanics.
But now....
you introduce 'pushing the ball'.
Can you give me the Japanese for that?

Much obliged.
Last edited by katafei on Thu 01.03.2008 4:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 01.03.2008 2:50 pm

I wish I knew what "pushing the ball" is in Japanese. It is a term I am not familiar with.. Maybe shirasagi can help us out..

I know "osu" is to push, but I do not think it will work in this case.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby inuinu » Thu 01.03.2008 4:40 pm

wish I knew what "pushing the ball" is in Japanese. It is a term I am not familiar with.. Maybe shirasagi can help us out..


sorry,I'm not shirasagi-san. :p
but anyway...
"pushing the ball" は「流し打ち」「流す」が主な言い方ですね。
合気道などでも「受け流す」という阜サがあるし、
「自然の流れに任せて、無理をしない」という感じがカッコイイということで、
「流し打ち」は「職人技」と称されて、ファンの間でも玄人好みの打ち方と見られていると思います。
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 01.03.2008 4:51 pm

no need to apologize inuinu.. your help is definately appreciated too.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby katafei » Thu 01.03.2008 4:57 pm

ありがとうございます

Do I understand correctly that baseball fans prefer 流し打ち because it has 打ち, to hit, in the word?
That would make sense to me ^_^

It's actually in JB
流し打ち 【ながしうち】 (n) hitting to the opposite field (baseball)
( I had heard of "inside-outing", but never of "the opposite field")
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby two_heads_talking » Fri 01.04.2008 10:45 am

hitting to the opposite field is hitting inside out. or inside-outing as you put.. it's a pretty common term in the US anyways.

the average batter pulls their swing anyways. it's why right handers hit to left field more often and why left handers hit to right field more often. Learning to correct that is an ongoing process for most batters.
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RE: Baseball terms

Postby MarioGeek92 » Sun 01.27.2008 9:06 pm

Speaking of Baseball terms, I wonder how you say "Second Base" in Japanese... xD
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