Americanization

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guitarplayer7694
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Americanization

Post by guitarplayer7694 » Wed 01.02.2008 3:29 pm

How much has japan been Americanized?

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two_heads_talking
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RE: Americanization

Post by two_heads_talking » Wed 01.02.2008 4:01 pm

no more or less than America has been Japanized.

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Hatori
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RE: Americanization

Post by Hatori » Wed 01.02.2008 5:45 pm

They have been greatly influence and greatly infulenced others too. I'm pretty much saying the same thing as THT.

Anyway, when did Japan actually trade and interact with America? I know a long time ago they didn't have many relations to other countries.
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RE: Americanization

Post by Orcrist » Wed 01.02.2008 6:08 pm

Hatori wrote:
Anyway, when did Japan actually trade and interact with America? I know a long time ago they didn't have many relations to other countries.
Commodore Perry forced the first US - JPN trade; from wikipedia:
[edit]First visit, 1852-1853

Japanese 1854 print relating Perry's visit.In 1852, Perry embarked from Norfolk, Virginia for Japan, in command of a squadron in search of a Japanese trade treaty. Aboard a black-hulled steam frigate, he ported Mississippi, Plymouth, Saratoga, and Susquehanna at Uraga Harbor near Edo (modern Tokyo) on July 8, 1853, and was met by representatives of the Tokugawa Shogunate who told him to proceed to Nagasaki, where there was limited trade with the Netherlands and which was the only Japanese port open to foreigners at that time (see Sakoku). Perry refused to leave and demanded permission to present a letter from President Millard Fillmore, threatening force if he was denied. The Japanese military forces could not resist Perry's modern weaponry; the "Black Ships" would then become, in Japan, a threatening symbol of Western technology.[7]

The Japanese government let Perry come ashore to avoid a naval bombardment. Perry landed at Kurihama (in modern-day Yokosuka) on July 14, presented the letter to delegates present, and left for the Chinese coast, promising to return for a reply.[8]


[edit] Second visit, 1854

Commodore Perry's fleet for his second visit to Japan in 1854.Perry returned in February 1854 with twice as many ships, finding that the delegates had prepared a treaty embodying virtually all the demands in Fillmore's letter. Perry signed the Convention of Kanagawa on March 31, 1854 and departed, mistakenly believing the agreement had been made with imperial representatives.[9]

On his way to Japan, Perry anchored off of Keelung in Formosa (modern day Taiwan), for ten days. Perry and crew members landed on Formosa and investigated the potential of mining the coal deposits in that area. He emphasized in his reports that Formosa provided a convenient mid-way trade location. Formosa was also very defensible. It could serve as a base for exploration like Cuba had done for the Spanish in the Americas. Occupying Formosa could help the US to counter European monopolization of the major trade routes. The United States government did not respond to Perry's proposal to claim sovereignty over Formosa.[10]
Before that (if I remember correctly mainly the Tokugawa age) it was exclusively the Chinese and Dutch that were allowed to trade. Even before that there were some Portugeze aswell.
I still got lot of reading to do on these subjects tho, so it's not thát accurate.

To remain ontopic; I don't think you could actually say Japan is being "Americanized", since pretty much every American influence is immediatly being "Japanized". If you really want to see an Americanized country you should visit the Netherlands sometime. ;)

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RE: Americanization

Post by chikara » Wed 01.02.2008 6:46 pm

two_heads_talking wrote:
no more or less than America has been Japanized.
From a non-USAian point of view I would have to disagree. I certainly saw a lot more USA influences in Japan than I have seen Japanese influences in the USA. Unlike your good self however I have not lived long term in either country.

I believe that the influence of the predominately USA occupation forces in Japan post WWII increased the "westernisation" of Japan. As the USA was the major western influence then this "westernisation" appears as "Americanisation".

USA culture is certainly a dominant force in the world and many countries are becoming "Americanised". I often lament at the Americanisation of my own country.
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RE: Americanization

Post by Gundaetiapo » Wed 01.02.2008 8:14 pm

From a non-USAian point of view I would have to disagree. I certainly saw a lot more USA influences in Japan than I have seen Japanese influences in the USA. Unlike your good self however I have not lived long term in either country.

I believe that the influence of the predominately USA occupation forces in Japan post WWII increased the "westernisation" of Japan. As the USA was the major western influence then this "westernisation" appears as "Americanisation".

USA culture is certainly a dominant force in the world and many countries are becoming "Americanised". I often lament at the Americanisation of my own country.
You're not going to use the term "USAianisation"?

I wouldn't mind seeing more foreign contributions to American culture. If you could impart one Australian feature to the US, what would it be?

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Oracle
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RE: Americanization

Post by Oracle » Wed 01.02.2008 8:36 pm

I prefer the term Coca-Colanization
Last edited by Oracle on Wed 01.02.2008 8:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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RE: Americanization

Post by chikara » Wed 01.02.2008 9:18 pm

Gundaetiapo wrote:
........ If you could impart one Australian feature to the US, what would it be?
English ;)
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guitarplayer7694
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RE: Americanization

Post by guitarplayer7694 » Wed 01.02.2008 9:24 pm

chikara wrote:
Gundaetiapo wrote:
........ If you could impart one Australian feature to the US, what would it be?
English ;)
what do you mean?

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RE: Americanization

Post by Tspoonami » Wed 01.02.2008 10:18 pm

guitarplayer7694 wrote:
what do you mean?
Precisely.
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RE: Americanization

Post by Majik4ever » Wed 01.02.2008 10:20 pm

If you could impart one Australian feature to the US, what would it be?
Mabey their cute accent?...lol
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gfunk
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RE: Americanization

Post by gfunk » Thu 01.03.2008 2:55 am

Your question is simply impossible to answer. To quantify "Americanization" in Japan is like quantifying globalization.

How much has Japan been Americanized? Well it depends from what period you're talking about. And it's more of a "westernization" than an "americanization".

Let me just put it this way... Japan has evolved. Just like the USA has taken a lot from different cultures. But it's still uniquely Japan.

Oh and chikara you should read Japanamerica. Even though I agree with you of how general American culture hasn't been affected by Japan like other cultures are affected by the almost imperialism of American culture, it's the opposite on pop culture. Where I come from there are generations of kids that were brought up to Captain Tsubasa.

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RE: Americanization

Post by keatonatron » Thu 01.03.2008 3:38 am

It is a difficult question...

Would you consider the increase in Startbuckses and McDonald'ses Americanization? Although they are American companies, they have spread to all corners of the world, so wouldn't it just be a part of globalization? If you consider that Americanization, then you would have to say the entire world is being Americanized.

Following that logic, wouldn't the spread of English be considered Biritshization? America is more Britishized than Japan is Americanized! (And would the amount of English in Japanese society be a result of Americanization or Britishization?)

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RE: Americanization

Post by Shirasagi » Thu 01.03.2008 5:13 am

Look at it this way. Kentucky Fried Chicken clearly comes from America. There is Kentucky Fried Chicken in Japan. In Japan families by special orders of Kentucky Fried Chicken to eat on Christmas Eve and Christmas. In America, even if someone by chance eats KFC on Christmas, no one goes especially to KFC for Christmas dinner.

So, is Kentucky Fried Chicken an indication of Americanization? Is Taco Bell an indication of the Mexicanization of America?
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two_heads_talking
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RE: Americanization

Post by two_heads_talking » Thu 01.03.2008 11:57 am

guitarplayer7694 wrote:
chikara wrote:
Gundaetiapo wrote:
........ If you could impart one Australian feature to the US, what would it be?
English ;)
what do you mean?
He means we speak American and not English. Of course, going on that same thought, Aussies, speak Australian rather than English as well. and the Brits would speak British as well.

But yeah, it would be nice if all English speaking countries could come to a similar agreement. lol.. but that will happen about the same time that mars is colonized. I am not holding my breath.

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