Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - Psychology jobs in Nihon

Psychology jobs in Nihon

Post questions and answers about living or visiting Japan or the culture

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby BrianM » Sat 01.05.2008 3:03 pm

Mike Cash wrote:
That you didn't have enough Japanese ability to make a search for it yourself and very easily find information in under a minute was sufficient indication that your language abilities lag so far behind that bringing them up to speed in time to make this a realistic professional goal isn't likely. It's why I initially passed up responding to the thread.

All it takes is a J-Google on 臨床心理士 資格 ("clinical psychologist" and "qualifications") and there's more stuff than you can shake a stick at. That you were unable to find anything in English should be another clue as to the impracticality of this, in addition to the very valid points that Keats raised.

Here's a relevant sentence from the Wikipedia entry on clinical psychologists:

2006年には、指定校以外の大学院で心理学を専攻した人物の受け入れが終了し、2007年度以降は、資格認定協会の指定校修了者のみに受験資格が与えられる。

Unless you plan to graduate from one of the graduate schools listed in section 4 you will not even be able to sit the exams for acceptance by the professional board in Japan.

Fortunately for you, there is no national exam and if you otherwise meet visa requirements and can convince people to come to you, then I suppose you can practice here. But the likelihood of being hired by a hospital absent credentials from the Japanese accrediting body is a gamble....and I would take the under on that.

There may be options for working serving a mostly foreign client base. But if you're planning on working at a Japanese hospital doing one-on-one counseling for Japanese clients in Japanese....you're not being realistic.

And to answer your last question....learning Japanese is indeed a "phase" or a "fad" with most people I encounter in places like this. The vast majority just fade away after a while. And over the years I've observed inquiries from countless youth who despite never having been to Japan in their lives were sure it was where they were destined from birth to live forever-n-ever-ever-n-ever and they were burning with a white-hot oh-my-gosh-I'll-do-anything-I'll-die-if-I-don't-get-to-Japan fever. And I usually offer to take the day off work to pick them up at the airport when they get here.

I have yet to miss a day of work on account of them.

The more afire they are, the less likely they'll ever show up even as a tourist.

What on God's green earth gives you the idea you want to settle down and have a career in this country anyway? Have you lived here before? How do you know you could even tolerate it? Do you realize that among Western foreigners staying here beyond even such a short time as three years places you among a very tiny minority? Only a tiny sliver of those who come here manage to stay past that.

I know a few scattered foreigners who have stayed longer, 20+ years and no intention of going anywhere. And of them I don't know a single one who had it as their intent to do so prior to coming here. Let me recap that for you: People who come here intending to stay forever either never show up or they usually bail out in less than three years (or when they reach/approach 30 or their kids approach school age.....whichever comes first). People who stay here forever never really meant to; it just sort of worked out that way.


So you basically ignored my other post. Am I moving to Japan this year blindly? Am i finishing school this year? No, learn before you speak.
What basis do u have to make the assumption that i will just stop learning Japanese and give up on it? You don't know me or how long I have been studying Japanese.

Do you think I am one of those "kids" that learns the language because of those cute wide eyed girls, and those totally cool animes? If you do, you are completely wrong, just because those are the ones you encountered in the past does not mean that other students of Japanese culture are the same.

And what about people who come from other countries to America to become psychologists or doctors? Do they know the culture of Americans? No, but they learn it. They find ways to. Nothing is impossible.
What I get out of you is, I learned Japanese, I am a super human and no one else will ever learn it.

And you'll pick up anyone who is going? Awesome, my friend and I are going this June so you can pick us up at Narita.
User avatar
BrianM
 
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu 09.14.2006 9:03 pm
Location: U.S.A
Native language: English/Portuguese

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby BrianM » Sat 01.05.2008 3:08 pm

keatonatron wrote:
One good indication of the types of people that you see a lot on these boards are the ones that say "I learned Hiragana two years ago, and then relearned it last year and got pretty good, but I'm still having problems."

These same people, who take 3 years or so to master Hiragana while I had it down 2 weeks after joining a site like this, are the same people who start threads about wanting to be manga artists, pop idols and ninjas in Japan. Forgive us for being skeptical whenever another "familiar face" from these forums tells us their requests to infiltrate Japanese society in a nearly impossible way while having not yet made noticeable headway with learning the language.

And I think the sad, horrible, yet very-true truth is that no Japanese person would trust you to be their doctor. It's horrible to say it, but it's absolutely true. Of course if they were forced to sit down with you for 2 hours a week for 3 months or so, I'm sure they would agree that you're a wonderful psychologist and there would be no problems, but there's no way it would get that far because every one one of your patients would stand up with a "Hell no!" the second you walked in the room and said "Hi, I'm your doctor."

We aren't crushing dreams here, we're just creating small disappointments to save people much bigger disappointments further down the road.

Edit: I figure I might as well explain WHY Japanese people would act as stated above. Japanese people as a whole have very bad self-images and are embarassed when compared with the west. It's the reason for the quick industrialization during the 19th century, it's the reason pornography is censored; heck, it's even the reason they entered the Russo-Japan war.

If a Japanese person were to think about talking to an American psychologist, they would think "Americans don't have nearly as many mental problems as Japanese people do... this guy is going to think I'm a total nut case! He might even overact and try to take drastic measures, even though I'm just this way because I'm Japanese."

Try to factor that into your studies... :|


I mastered Hiragana in 2 weeks, and the same for katakana. To me the language is pretty simple, just follow the rules.
And I am not one of the kids u described, I despise anime. And although it may seem outlandish, I have a feeling it has been done, if not in psychology, in other professions. And i would not want to open my own private practice, that is not my goal. Either to become a teacher in a college teaching intro courses or working in a hospital. I am still in undergraduate college and have a long way to go, but i am exploring any possibilities that may come in the future.
BTW, I have seen many of those people around, the ones that are obsessed with Japan for the wrong reason, and I understand that you have seen many come and go, but I have been learning for a year and a half and plan to keep with it for a long time.
User avatar
BrianM
 
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu 09.14.2006 9:03 pm
Location: U.S.A
Native language: English/Portuguese

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Shirasagi » Sat 01.05.2008 3:44 pm

BrianM wrote:
So you basically ignored my other post. Am I moving to Japan this year blindly? Am i finishing school this year? No, learn before you speak.
What basis do u have to make the assumption that i will just stop learning Japanese and give up on it? You don't know me or how long I have been studying Japanese.


Mike doesn't have to know you. He only has to know that you're still new to the language (which you have made clear in this thread). The fact is, learning Japanese for real is hard, it takes a lot of work and many years, and for real fluency extended immersion in Japan. The fact is, the vast majority of those who start learning Japanese give it up, so Mike is playing the odds. It's like all those who go to Hollywood to become filmmakers and actors. Sure, some make it, and maybe you'll be one of them. I hope so. But you're playing long odds.

Do you think I am one of those "kids" that learns the language because of those cute wide eyed girls, and those totally cool animes? If you do, you are completely wrong, just because those are the ones you encountered in the past does not mean that other students of Japanese culture are the same.


I think it's quite clear you're learning the language to be a clinical psychologist in Japan. Frankly, that's pretty much as pie-in-the-sky as those who like cute wide eyed girls and totally cool anime.

And what about people who come from other countries to America to become psychologists or doctors? Do they know the culture of Americans? No, but they learn it. They find ways to. Nothing is impossible.


Those who come from other countries to become psychologists have two advantages on you: 1) they're not starting to learn the language at 20 years old, and 2) America has a completely different attitudes concerning both clinical psychology and foreign immigration.

You certainly don't have to like Mike. (Just between you and me, I don't think he really cares one way or the other.) But if you're serious about coming to Japan, it's in your best interest to ignore the curmudgeonly attitude and just learn as much as you can from him.
Josh Reyer
------------
頓ニ纜ヲ斬テ大荒ニ入レ。
長岡桃嶺房成
Shirasagi
 
Posts: 443
Joined: Wed 02.14.2007 10:50 am

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Sat 01.05.2008 5:08 pm

Honestly, studying Japanese to watch anime strikes me as far more reasonable than studying Japanese to be a clinical psychologist in Japan.
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Wakannai » Sat 01.05.2008 5:55 pm

Brian,

Please stop quote spamming. Quote only specific lines you are responding to.

If you are responding to an entire post, then just quote "soand so said" or just use their name in the first sentence.

I mastered Hiragana in 2 weeks, and the same for katakana.


A lot of people seem to misunderstand the meaning of mastered and confuse it with Learned or with attained proficiency. You can say you learned kana in a few weeks, but to master anything takes a lifetime of dedication. Learning the tea ceremony is something you can learn in a few days. Mastering it is something else entirely. Mastered tells me that you can read an write in kana without any mistakes and very fast. Someone that has mastered writing can use a sample of casual writing as a sample for new students to copy. Have you had some master of Sho look at your writing samples and express how they wish they wrote as well as you? If not, I'd stop bragging about your vaunted skills.

There are culture classes that teach things like this.


No there are not. An entire culture is not something you can learn in a class, or even a series of classes. Classes can help reduce the disconnect but they will not eliminate it. The only way you can eliminate it is to turn 2 years old and go through the entire process of growing up in that society. Cultural background is the aggregate of years of immersion. Any distillation in a class room setting will be very abridged.

Also,

Try not to whine when people don't give you the answer you want to hear.
Last edited by Wakannai on Sat 01.05.2008 6:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Wakannai
 
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu 10.18.2007 6:38 am

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Simon86 » Sat 01.05.2008 6:11 pm

As long as you're doing what you love and you're happy then nothing else matters. Remember that, it doesn't have to be all about Japan. ;) Keep learning the language, and maybe even take on one or two more if it's possible. The more you can communicate with the world, the better...

I wouldn't mind living in Japan... although I don't really know what it's like, i would go just for the experience. I'm saving money this year to travel and do some charity work, then i'm going to college to start a career.

Don't be put off by some of the others here, they may sound harsh but they're only trying to help, I've taken Mike the wrong way before... I guess they lose heart after seeing so many Japan freaks come and go...

There are actually interesting people here that I want to get to know better (hint hint Mike I sent you a bloody pm ages ago... ;))
Simon86
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu 07.12.2007 3:49 pm

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Oyaji » Sat 01.05.2008 10:10 pm

My wife and I (mostly my wife) operate a small workshop for mentally/emotionally handicapped people (精神障害者小規模作業所) in our home, and though I’m no expert in the field, this has given me the opportunity to see a part of Japanese society that most Japanese don’t even see. I’m sure what Keat said would be true in many cases, but I’ve found that many of our clients actually find it easier to talk to me because I’m a foreigner. They seem to feel embarrassed to talk to other Japanese people, because they think they will be looked down upon for being different, and often this fear is justified.

For the most part I agree with what Mike and the others have said, but should you overcome the odds and become the one in a thousand exception, I can say there is definitely a need for quality psychologists in Japan.

Doing a cursory search with Google, I was able to find quite a bit of information that you might find useful. I think that writing a letter or e-mail to a mental health center in Japan − I found several in my search − would be more productive than posting a vague question on a language board.

Several years ago at a party in Tokyo I met an American psychologist who was practicing in Tokyo. He told me his clientele was made up mostly of foreigners who were finding it difficult to adjust to life in Japan.
User avatar
Oyaji
 
Posts: 1334
Joined: Sun 04.30.2006 9:57 pm

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby AJBryant » Sat 01.05.2008 10:34 pm

I would like to piggyback onto something that Oyaji said -- there *is* a market in Japan for clinical psychologists who specialize in foreigners -- for one thing, you share the culture (probably), and you have the fine-tuned fluency in language and nuance that are critical in therapy.

The trouble is getting licensure in Japan.

Tony
User avatar
AJBryant
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5313
Joined: Sun 10.09.2005 11:29 am
Location: Indiana
Native language: English
Gender: Male

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Mike Cash » Sat 01.05.2008 11:36 pm

Actually, there is no licensure in Japan. At least not a national exam such as doctors, nurses, and other such health care professionals have to take. There is only accreditation by a professional group. As I pointed out in the Wikipedia link that likely went for naught, starting this year the board has decided that it will no longer allow anyone to sit the exams unless they have graduated from a select list of graduate schools.

So as far as that goes, he can come here and practice....just without accreditation. So long as he maintains some sort of professional ties and accreditation back home, I think he would be good to go for specializing in treating foreign clients. But as I pointed out earlier, employment at a hospital dealing with Japanese patients minus accreditation is an iffy prospect.

I already typed that up for him before, but as with so many posters who come here and get told what they need to hear rather than what they want to hear, he may have looked over the pertinent and useful information while he was too busy being pissed off at me.

Look, Brian, I'm not one of those foreigners who takes a possessive attitude toward Japan (a very common phenomenon). It's no skin off my nose if you come here or not. But a lot of what goes on on boards like these is people ask a question and lots of well-intentioned people whose main goal is to be heard and to be liked start laying on lots of rah-rah feel-good crap based on neither knowledge nor experience. They'll tell you anything you want to hear and care not in the least that it is uninformed hogwash. I, on the other hand, tend to catch hell and be called a big meanie for giving frank opinions based on solid facts and personal experience.

And if you want to ignore me, that's perfectly fine as well. I can't recall a single person who has, to my knowledge, taken my advice about one single thing related to coming to Japan. I can recall some who later on told me they wished they had.

So you do as you like. And on the day you move to Japan to begin your permanent life practicing clinical psychology here, I will take off work and pick you up at the airport. (Work on your critical reading skills a bit. I didn't offer to pick you up for your tourist visit this summer). See you at Narita in six years or so. Do me a favor and try to fly in on a Sunday....I really can't afford to miss work.
Never underestimate my capacity for pettiness.
User avatar
Mike Cash
 
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun 08.20.2006 3:38 am
Native language: English

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby BrianM » Sat 01.05.2008 11:42 pm

Well that was the best comment from you so far;). But seriously I do appreciate the comments as hard as they were. It did make me think, I still want to go to Japan and hopefully live their since I am not that big a fan of America, but thats another issue. The options are open to me right now, and whatever happens in the future happens but what i know is that I will keep up with Japanese studies because it is something I enjoy greatly. I have options on what i'll do in the future but if all else fails, then i will most likely live in Edgewater here in NJ where there is a pretty big Japanese population; esp being right next to nyc.
i'll see you in 6 years or so, for that pickup:-D
User avatar
BrianM
 
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu 09.14.2006 9:03 pm
Location: U.S.A
Native language: English/Portuguese

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby AJBryant » Sun 01.06.2008 1:10 am

A suggestion you might want to try:

If you're serious, see if your university has a year-in-Japan program. It'll give you a chance to live (and study) in Japan, and see if it's really all that great.


Tony
User avatar
AJBryant
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5313
Joined: Sun 10.09.2005 11:29 am
Location: Indiana
Native language: English
Gender: Male

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Sun 01.06.2008 10:00 am

Definitely a good idea. I had some mind to live in Japan, maybe not permanently, but for some time -- 2 years was more than enough for me, though.
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby Mike Cash » Sun 01.06.2008 10:40 am

Taking a year off after your undergrad studies and prior to entering grad school to come here and teach English might not be a bad idea. Get a better idea of if this is where you want to be or not, make a few contacts in your field if you put yourself out, and maybe save up a few bucks for grad school while you're at it. You wouldn't be the first person who ever did that sort of thing.
Never underestimate my capacity for pettiness.
User avatar
Mike Cash
 
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun 08.20.2006 3:38 am
Native language: English

RE: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby sutekidesune » Mon 02.18.2008 4:38 am

Wow, I'd like to thank all of you for your helpful comments (and BrianM for bringing up this topic). I've been considering doing counseling work in Japan when I finish my MA, so this has been very helpful. :) Thanks!
sutekidesune
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon 02.18.2008 4:30 am

Re: Psychology jobs in Nihon

Postby andrewtokyojapan » Sun 05.17.2009 10:46 pm

Hi, hope this is not shutting the stable door long after .... but as this page shows in searches on being a psychologist in Japan, i am posting a few links to clarify how what psychology degree qualifications, training and examination requirements have to be met in order to become qualified and registered in Japan by the Japan Society of Certified Clinical Psychologists to practice as a Clinical Psychologist:

In English;
http://www.counselingjapan.com/eng/qualifications.php

Much more detailed information in Japanese at the official website of the Japanese Certification Board for Clinical Psychologists (日本臨床心理士資格認定協会) which examines and qualifies JSCCP Clinical Psychologists:
http://www4.ocn.ne.jp/~jcbcp/contents.html

For more information on how to become a registered Clinical Psychologist in Japan go to the website of the Japan Society of Certified Clinical Psychologists:
http://www.jsccp.jp/

and click on 臨床心理士になるには which takes you to how to find the book published annually by the JSCCP detailing current requirements for qualifying to be able to work as a Clinical Psychologist in Japan:
http://www.jsccp.jp/whatscp/index.html#4

Hope this may be of some help to someone.


As of April 2007 there were 16,732
andrewtokyojapan
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun 05.17.2009 9:57 pm
Location: Tokyo Japan
Gender: Male

PreviousNext

Return to Culture and Info about living in Japan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests