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Question's while going through Yuki's Story Chp1

Translations of chapters from the story by our own richvh

Question's while going through Yuki's Story Chp1

Postby LegendsEnd » Mon 05.07.2007 8:41 pm

Some of the questions may be translational questions but for the most part I think they're grammar problems so I decided to post this here. A mod may move this thread to translation section if they think otherwise (I was too lazy to split the post). Critique on my translations are appreciated, a lot of questions incoming!

In: 第一章
Is it dai ichi shou or dai hitotsu shou? There is furigana to suggest itsu but that sounds weird. If it is, wouldn't that mean it's chapter 5? How would chapter two be said?

In: 昔々、ある小さな村にゆきという娘がおばあさんと二人で暮らしていました。
Instead of ending it with いました, could it have just been replaced with た? Is there a difference?

In: ゆきは、とても美(うつく)しい子(こ)でしたが、二人(ふたり)は大変(たいへん)貧(まず)しい生活(せいかつ)をしていました。
I'm translating this as: Yuki wa totemo utsukushii ko deshita ga, futari wa taihen mazushii seikatsu de kurashite imashita.

What I think it means: Yuki is a very beautiful girl <something here?> and the two of them are living a troublesome poor life.

What exactly is mazushii? I think it's poor but I'm pretty sure the word for that is binbo (My vocab comes entirely from anime and my memory isn't too good :P) if it is poor, is there a difference between the two words?
What does the deshita ga mean? The ga sounds out of the place as well, it's odd saying that part aloud.

In: 村(むら)全体(ぜんたい)も貧(まず)しく、若者(わかもの)の姿(すがた)もあまり見(み)られませんでした。そして、ゆきと結婚(けっこん)したいという者(もの)も、誰(だれ)一人(ひとり)として現(あらわ)れたことはありませんでした。

I have it translated as: mura zentai mo muzushiku, wakamono no sugata mo amari miraremasen deshita. soshite, yuki to kekkon shitai to iu mono mo, dare hitori to shite arawareta koto wa arimasendeshita.

What I think it means: The entirety of the village is also poor, the young ones' appearance are also not very pleasant to the eye. Thus, Yuki said she wanted to marry, no one showed appeared [A groom is implied here??].

I believe I translated that poorly. The second sentence especially as the 'to' before kekkon threw me off a bit. Does 'to' not mean 'and' ?
I expected zenbu instead of zentai, is there a difference?
Why is it muzushiku instead of muzushii?
I know 'to iu' means said, what is the 'mono mo' after it trying to say?
The last part, "dare hitori to shite arawareta koto wa arimasendeshita.", I'm not too sure what it's saying, is it implying that no man showed up to marry her?

In: 「ゆきや、お前(まえ)の幸(しあわ)せを探(さが)すために、都(みやこ)に行(い)った方(ほう)がいい」と毎日(まいにち)おばあさんは言(い)いました。

「おばあさまを独(ひと)りここに残(のこ)して大(おお)きな町(まち)へ出(で)かけることはできません」と毎日(まいにち)ゆきは答(こた)えました。

I have translated as: 「yuki ya, omae no shiawase so sagasu tameni, miyako ni itta hougaii」 to mainichi obaasan hai imashita.

「obaasan mo so hitori koko ni nokori shite ooki na machi e dekakeru koto wa dekimasen」 to mainichi yuki wa kotae mashita

What I think it means: [Yuki, in order for you to find happiness, head to the capital] which is what her grandma said everyday

[Grandma has never left for a big city before] Which is how Yuki replied everyday

What are the weird L shaped brackets?
What is the 'ya' after Yuki for?
I'm not too sure on the usage of the particle 'so' ...
I have no idea what hougaii means, I think I translated it wrong.
Does hai imashita mean 'said' or does it mean 'said yes'? I can't translate well :(
Having nokori and dekkakeru in the same sentence seems redundant to me, I think I translated the sentence wrong (to english).
Not sure what the phrase 'Obaasan mo so' means, having two particles after each other seems a bit weird.
I thought Dekimasen implies 'cannot', but the sentence here makes more sense to me as ' have not' because of my poor translation I think.

In: ある日(ひ)、おばあさんは亡(な)くなりました。おばあさんをお墓(はか)に葬(ほうむ)ってから、ゆきはなけなしの家財(かざい)を集(あつ)め、大(おお)きな町(まち)へ向(む)けて出発(しゅっぱつ)しました。

I translated as: aru hi, obaasan wa nakanari mashita. obaasan souhaka ni houmutte kara, yuki wa nashi no kazai soatsuno, ooki na machi e mukete shuupatsu shimashita.

What I think it means: one day, grandma <died or went missing?>. Since grandma praised <something>, Yuki <something>, headed for the big city.

I have no idea what nakanari/souhaka means.
I have no idea what the phrase 'yuki wa nashi no kazai soatsuno' is saying.

Also as an aside, is there a special setting people have on their browser to read japanese text without hurting the eyes? I can't tell really well if there is a line/circle at the topright of hiragana and most kanji is very squished to the point I can't count the number of strokes so I cannot look it up in a kanji dictionary :(
Last edited by LegendsEnd on Mon 05.07.2007 8:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Question's while going through Yuki's Story Chp1

Postby richvh » Mon 05.07.2007 9:38 pm

LegendsEnd wrote:
Some of the questions may be translational questions but for the most part I think they're grammar problems so I decided to post this here. A mod may move this thread to translation section if they think otherwise (I was too lazy to split the post). Critique on my translations are appreciated, a lot of questions incoming!

In: 第一章
Is it dai ichi shou or dai hitotsu shou? There is furigana to suggest itsu but that sounds weird. If it is, wouldn't that mean it's chapter 5? How would chapter two be said?

It's Dai Isshou; the -chi of ichi undergoes a euphonic change before certain consonants. (That's a small っ in the furigana.)

In: 昔々、ある小さな村にゆきという娘がおばあさんと二人で暮らしていました。
Instead of ending it with いました, could it have just been replaced with た? Is there a difference?


It could have, but masu/desu form is (I understand) more intimate than ru/da form in story telling (the opposite of conversation.)

In: ゆきは、とても美(うつく)しい子(こ)でしたが、二人(ふたり)は大変(たいへん)貧(まず)しい生活(せいかつ)をしていました。
I'm translating this as: Yuki wa totemo utsukushii ko deshita ga, futari wa taihen mazushii seikatsu de kurashite imashita.

What I think it means: Yuki is a very beautiful girl <something here?> and the two of them are living a troublesome poor life.

What exactly is mazushii? I think it's poor but I'm pretty sure the word for that is binbo (My vocab comes entirely from anime and my memory isn't too good :P) if it is poor, is there a difference between the two words?


It is poor; I used binbo first, but my proofreaders had me change it to mazushii. I don't know the difference.

What does the deshita ga mean? The ga sounds out of the place as well, it's odd saying that part aloud.


"Ga" after the verb/copula means "but" or (sometimes) "and". Your translation is close, try "Yuki was a very beautiful girl, but the two of them were very poor."

In: 村(むら)全体(ぜんたい)も貧(まず)しく、若者(わかもの)の姿(すがた)もあまり見(み)られませんでした。そして、ゆきと結婚(けっこん)したいという者(もの)も、誰(だれ)一人(ひとり)として現(あらわ)れたことはありませんでした。

I have it translated as: mura zentai mo muzushiku, wakamono no sugata mo amari miraremasen deshita. soshite, yuki to kekkon shitai to iu mono mo, dare hitori to shite arawareta koto wa arimasendeshita.

What I think it means: The entirety of the village is also poor, the young ones' appearance are also not very pleasant to the eye. Thus, Yuki said she wanted to marry, no one showed appeared [A groom is implied here??].

I believe I translated that poorly. The second sentence especially as the 'to' before kekkon threw me off a bit. Does 'to' not mean 'and' ?


In this case, it's more like "with"

I expected zenbu instead of zentai, is there a difference?

Not really sure; another proofreader change.
Why is it muzushiku instead of muzushii?

Continuative form.
I know 'to iu' means said, what is the 'mono mo' after it trying to say?

The mono are the ones saying yuki to kekkon shitai (or rather, not saying it, since they're "arimasen deshita")
The last part, "dare hitori to shite arawareta koto wa arimasendeshita.", I'm not too sure what it's saying, is it implying that no man showed up to marry her?[/quote]
No man showed up saying he wanted to marry her. You messed up the young people part to. It's "Young men were rarely seen"

In: 「ゆきや、お前(まえ)の幸(しあわ)せを探(さが)すために、都(みやこ)に行(い)った方(ほう)がいい」と毎日(まいにち)おばあさんは言(い)いました。

「おばあさまを独(ひと)りここに残(のこ)して大(おお)きな町(まち)へ出(で)かけることはできません」と毎日(まいにち)ゆきは答(こた)えました。

I have translated as: 「yuki ya, omae no shiawase so sagasu tameni, miyako ni itta hougaii」 to mainichi obaasan hai imashita.

「obaasan mo so hitori koko ni nokori shite ooki na machi e dekakeru koto wa dekimasen」 to mainichi yuki wa kotae mashita

What I think it means: [Yuki, in order for you to find happiness, head to the capital] which is what her grandma said everyday

[Grandma has never left for a big city before] Which is how Yuki replied everyday

What are the weird L shaped brackets?

Quotation marks.
[/quote]What is the 'ya' after Yuki for?[/quote]
Not really sure; another recent change. I think it's something old people add to young people's names.
I'm not too sure on the usage of the particle 'so' ...

Look again; there's no "so" there.
I have no idea what hougaii means, I think I translated it wrong.

"Should" do the preceding action.
Does hai imashita mean 'said' or does it mean 'said yes'? I can't translate well :(

It's particle "ha" (pronounced "wa"), indicating Grandma is doing the talking. The verb is "iimashita"
Having nokori and dekkakeru in the same sentence seems redundant to me, I think I translated the sentence wrong (to english).

Yup, you did. "I can't leave for the big city and leave you here alone."
Not sure what the phrase 'Obaasan mo so' means, having two particles after each other seems a bit weird.

It's Obaasama wo, not Obaasan mo so.
I thought Dekimasen implies 'cannot', but the sentence here makes more sense to me as ' have not' because of my poor translation I think.

In: ある日(ひ)、おばあさんは亡(な)くなりました。おばあさんをお墓(はか)に葬(ほうむ)ってから、ゆきはなけなしの家財(かざい)を集(あつ)め、大(おお)きな町(まち)へ向(む)けて出発(しゅっぱつ)しました。

I translated as: aru hi, obaasan wa nakanari mashita. obaasan souhaka ni houmutte kara, yuki wa nashi no kazai soatsuno, ooki na machi e mukete shuupatsu shimashita.

What I think it means: one day, grandma <died or went missing?>. Since grandma praised <something>, Yuki <something>, headed for the big city.

I have no idea what nakanari/souhaka means.

There is no so. そ<- so; を<- wo
nakunaru - passed away; ohaka - grave
I have no idea what the phrase 'yuki wa nashi no kazai soatsuno' is saying.

That's "nakenashi" and "wo atsume"; "Yuki gathered their few belongings"

Also as an aside, is there a special setting people have on their browser to read japanese text without hurting the eyes? I can't tell really well if there is a line/circle at the topright of hiragana and most kanji is very squished to the point I can't count the number of strokes so I cannot look it up in a kanji dictionary :(


Increase the text size (under the View menu; in Firefox you can use Control-+); in the forum, you can use the arrows above the post to change the kana/kanji size in the post.

Edit: Moving this to the forum devoted to the story.
Last edited by richvh on Mon 05.07.2007 9:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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ゆきの物語
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Re: RE: Question's while going through Yuki's Story Chp1

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Tue 05.13.2008 9:48 pm

This is a severe necropost (over a year), but I think it's justified because all the threads in this relatively small subforum, no matter how old, might still be used by people to help them try to read the story, and I am actually explaining a couple of things here that might help. If the admins believe this is an unjustified necropost then you can take appropriate action. :)

What exactly is mazushii? I think it's poor but I'm pretty sure the word for that is binbo (My vocab comes entirely from anime and my memory isn't too good :P) if it is poor, is there a difference between the two words?


It is poor; I used binbo first, but my proofreaders had me change it to mazushii. I don't know the difference.


My feeling is that binbo is a very casual and often insulting or humorous word; "mazushii" seems to fit better with the tone of this story.

I expected zenbu instead of zentai, is there a difference?

Not really sure; another proofreader change.


I think that "zenbu" tends to refer to a collection of things (sometimes abstract things), whereas "zentai" is perhaps more appropriate to mean "entire" or "whole" as referring to a village. 村の全部 might be read as "all of the villages" rather than "the entire village".
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Re: Question's while going through Yuki's Story Chp1

Postby samtsco » Sat 08.28.2010 9:43 am

I am strictly speaking from my own idea, but I think it is a pretty clear distinction between zenbu and zentai. The former as in 'all the potatoes,' the latter as in 'the whole desk.' Or more basically, zenbu is all of them and zentai is the whole thing.
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