Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

"funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Do you have a translation question?

"funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Synonymous » Wed 06.11.2008 3:10 am

Hello; I have two more questions about things I'm reading. The first is about a novel, and the second is about a sci-fi manga.

1) Lawrence, a college computer repairman, has a date with Laura, who has an (overly) active social life. Before that, though, Lawrence fixes a young professor's hard drive. She thanks him; he says he's happy to help the prettiest professor on campus. The professor's friend is seated nearby, and she picks a fight:

「いくらお世辞を言っても無駄よ。彼女は鉄の女なんだから。鉄の男じゃないと相手にしないわ。あなたみたいにふにゃふにゃしたのには、今のローラが似合いよ」

The last sentence is where I need help; I think it's the use of "funya funya". Online sources list it as a variant of "monya monya"/"munya munya", "to mumble"; WWWJDIC also says it denotes "limpness"/"flabbiness". Is she saying something to the effect of "A puffball like you is a better match for Laura"? Is Beth saying he's flabby, not wimpy? (Is she making an off-color pun about "limpness"?) Or am I off the mark entirely?

2) In the sci-fi manga, two space cadets are in a crisis situation; a spaceship (manned with a small crew) is about to crash-land nearby, and they're the only help available. The cadets debate what can be done. One says that it's impossible to save the ship because it's too old and worn-down to survive any emergency measures; the other angrily replies: 「落下どころではすまなくなるよ!それでもいいか!」

I at first thought that this meant something like "there's nothing to stop the spaceship from crashing" (i.e., it's completely stalled and has no emergency systems), but I was told that this instead meant something like that it's not just the ship that will be damaged; people will die if it crashes, and the second cadet can't believe that the first is all right with that loss of life. I can see this corrected version now, but could someone please confirm the corrected reading and explain the "-dokoro de wa sumanaku naru" usage a bit more to me?

Again, thanks to everyone for your time and patience. The previous answers have really helped me.
Synonymous
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat 04.19.2008 1:08 am

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Wed 06.11.2008 9:16 am

Synonymous wrote:2) In the sci-fi manga, two space cadets are in a crisis situation; a spaceship (manned with a small crew) is about to crash-land nearby, and they're the only help available. The cadets debate what can be done. One says that it's impossible to save the ship because it's too old and worn-down to survive any emergency measures; the other angrily replies: 「落下どころではすまなくなるよ!それでもいいか!」

I at first thought that this meant something like "there's nothing to stop the spaceship from crashing" (i.e., it's completely stalled and has no emergency systems), but I was told that this instead meant something like that it's not just the ship that will be damaged; people will die if it crashes, and the second cadet can't believe that the first is all right with that loss of life. I can see this corrected version now, but could someone please confirm the corrected reading and explain the "-dokoro de wa sumanaku naru" usage a bit more to me?


My interpretation of this is that the crashing spaceship will do more damage than just to the place they land, or that there will be a more severe effect than just the spaceship being damaged or crashing. すむ in this case means "to end" or "to be finished"; you often see すまない used to mean that something won't end with X (or ただですまない - It won't just end [there]). So literally "It [will become a situation where it] won't end with just [what happens at] the crash site! Are you OK with that!?"

However, 落下どころ could also mean not the literal place where the ship falls but just the incident of falling; I'm not completely sure about that.
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Oracle » Wed 06.11.2008 9:40 am

Yudan Taiteki wrote:However, 落下どころ could also mean not the literal place where the ship falls but just the incident of falling; I'm not completely sure about that.


This どころ is not a physical place, but the 'event' of falling as Yudan Taiteki has said above.
~どころではすまない together is indeed a sort of set phrase which means "~won't be enough" or "it won't stop with~ and is used to imply that some situation will exceed some limit. Pretty much anything can go before the どころ: nouns, verbs, adjectives etc
eg. 謝るどころではすまない = It'll take more than just apologising (= just apologising won't be enough)
User avatar
Oracle
 
Posts: 537
Joined: Mon 02.13.2006 9:03 am
Native language: English

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Hyperworm » Thu 06.12.2008 6:50 pm

If どころ is indeed not referring to a physical place, this thread still needs to pin down that sentence precisely. I'm not quite confident I've understood it.
The fact that it's すまなくなる and not just すまない seems to convey that "soon, it's going to become the case that it won't just end with ~", and that acting now would constrain the problem to simply 落下...?
Should 落下 here be interpreted as "crash" (the act of impacting the ground), or "fall" (the process before hitting the ground)?

If "crash":
it seems to me that we have 「落下どころではすまなくなるよ!」 = "Soon you'll have more than the (spaceship) crashing to deal with!" (lives will also be lost!), which implies that the speaker thinks that right now they will be able to settle this with "merely a crash", i.e. the speaker has basically abandoned the hope of stopping the ship crashing, and is focusing on saving the lives of the people onboard?

If "fall":
it seems we have 「落下どころではすまなくなるよ!」 = "Soon you'll have more than the (spaceship) falling to deal with!" (implying you'll have to deal with the crash, and its aftermath, and not merely the fact that the ship is currently falling)?
I'm not confident with this because that translation "Soon you'll have more than the spaceship falling to deal with" doesn't seem like it would make much sense to an English speaker; it doesn't seem to imply the crashing very well, and I can't see how that would be much different in Japanese. If it is right, what's the most natural English translation?

Or do we simply need more context? :)
fun translation snippets | need something translated?
BTC@1KMZXgoWiDshQis5Z7feCx8jaiP4QAB2ks
User avatar
Hyperworm
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Tue 11.20.2007 2:26 pm
Native language: English
Gender: Male

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Thu 06.12.2008 8:23 pm

More context, perhaps. The speakers are not on the ship?
-Chris Kern
User avatar
Yudan Taiteki
 
Posts: 5609
Joined: Wed 11.01.2006 11:32 pm
Native language: English

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Oracle » Thu 06.12.2008 9:05 pm

Hyperworm wrote:If "crash":
it seems to me that we have 「落下どころではすまなくなるよ!」 = "Soon you'll have more than the (spaceship) crashing to deal with!" (lives will also be lost!), which implies that the speaker thinks that right now they will be able to settle this with "merely a crash", i.e. the speaker has basically abandoned the hope of stopping the ship crashing, and is focusing on saving the lives of the people onboard?

If "fall":
it seems we have 「落下どころではすまなくなるよ!」 = "Soon you'll have more than the (spaceship) falling to deal with!" (implying you'll have to deal with the crash, and its aftermath, and not merely the fact that the ship is currently falling)?
I'm not confident with this because that translation "Soon you'll have more than the spaceship falling to deal with" doesn't seem like it would make much sense to an English speaker; it doesn't seem to imply the crashing very well, and I can't see how that would be much different in Japanese. If it is right, what's the most natural English translation?


It's the second of your interpretations. 落下 itself just means "fall", but the very obvious implication of something 'falling' out of orbit is that it will crash, so in this context the word could be translated as either. The statement 落下どころではすまなくなるよ means "it will mean more than just the ship crashing" (ie. other consequence like people on the ground dying too, some sort of political fallout etc. etc) so yes, to really understand the full meaning of that phrase more context is needed. an explanation is probably given somewhere in the preceeding story at some point, or explained after that.
User avatar
Oracle
 
Posts: 537
Joined: Mon 02.13.2006 9:03 am
Native language: English

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby Synonymous » Thu 06.12.2008 9:16 pm

It's as Oracle supposes; the ship is already in freefall and will crash if nothing is done. For context, the speakers aren't on the ship themselves but in an installation away from the ship and the potential impact site. There isn't anyone around where the ship would crash, but there are people on board the ship, so I assume that's the issue.

Thanks very much for the discussion of "-dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"; it helps a lot, as it's not a construction with which I was previouly familiar. Might I ask about "funya funya"? I'm still coming up blank with that one.
Synonymous
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat 04.19.2008 1:08 am

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby prikanonno » Tue 07.08.2008 7:38 am

ふにゃふにゃ is an onomatopeia that stands for something not solid.
ふにゃ・・・の here does for ふにゃ・・・な人: a person who is weak as funya~~.
"A weak person like you matches lora what she is".
prikanonno
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue 07.08.2008 5:20 am

Re: "funya funya" / "dokoro de wa sumanaku naru"

Postby 天才0211 » Mon 09.06.2010 3:07 am

its an off-colour joke, she's basically saying he can't get it up. ふにゃふにゃ is used to describe something soft but the only time i've really heard it used is when a woman is insinuating that a guy can't get it up.
天才0211
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon 09.06.2010 3:00 am
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Native language: English


Return to Translation Questions or Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests