Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

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somethinorwatever
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Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by somethinorwatever » Wed 07.02.2008 2:17 am

What's the best paper dictionary that you guys know of that does NOT use romaji? I borrowed a dictionary from the library and it was full of romaji. I really want a dictionary that uses japanese characters. Thank you guys! :D

*Edit: I meant to say English<->Japanese Dictionaries that didn't use romaji. Thank you!
Last edited by somethinorwatever on Wed 07.02.2008 3:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by becki_kanou » Wed 07.02.2008 3:02 am

I like Sanseido's Daily Concise Dictionary. It's made for Japanese speakers though, so it doesn't have readings for kanji.
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。

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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by richvh » Wed 07.02.2008 7:22 am

[Curious as to what kind of an English-Japanese would have no romaji. Would the English be all in katakana?]
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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by AJBryant » Wed 07.02.2008 1:09 pm

richvh wrote:[Curious as to what kind of an English-Japanese would have no romaji. Would the English be all in katakana?]
Rich you have an evil streak in you.

I can appreciate that. ;)


Tony

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somethinorwatever
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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by somethinorwatever » Wed 07.02.2008 1:41 pm

richvh wrote:[Curious as to what kind of an English-Japanese would have no romaji. Would the English be all in katakana?]
I mean no romaji to represent the Japanese. Of course the English will be in English! :)

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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by richvh » Wed 07.02.2008 2:31 pm

I think the point just went whooshing over your head.

This message is written entirely in romaji (= characters of Rome) - that is, the Latin alphabet that is the common heritage of central and western Europe, and areas heavily influenced by the cultures originating there. That it also happens to be written in English has nothing to do with the characters it is written in - it could have been written using the Greek or Cyrillic alphabets, or katakana, and still be English; it could be written in French, German, Turkish, or Japanese, and still be written using romaji. Saying "the English is written in English" is an oxymoron.
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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by furrykef » Wed 07.02.2008 4:26 pm

richvh wrote:Saying "the English is written in English" is an oxymoron.
No, it's a tautology, which is pretty much the opposite of an oxymoron. An oxymoron is a contradiction in terms and therefore false; a tautology is automatically true, but only because of circular definition.

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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by AJBryant » Wed 07.02.2008 5:53 pm

Well, since we're tossing around words like oxymoron and tautology, I want to throw in my favorite one: catachresis.

Catachresis is an incorrect usage and mixed metaphor. My favorite example is "He's riding the waves of his saber rattling."

This has been a temporary thread hijack. We now return you to your regular thread topic.

Tony

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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by clay » Wed 07.02.2008 7:08 pm

What an informative thread. I've learned a lot--just not much about dictionaries. :lol:
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Re: Your favorite (paper) dictionaries

Post by furrykef » Wed 07.02.2008 8:45 pm

Just one last bit before we get back on topic (assuming we do ;))... I once came up with a mixed metaphor that actually works: "However you slice it, it's one tough cookie." Two unrelated idioms that happen to go together. I find it amusing.

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