Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

View topic - Make-up and politeness

Make-up and politeness

Post questions and answers about living or visiting Japan or the culture

Make-up and politeness

Postby Dehitay » Mon 09.15.2008 11:58 pm

A student from Japan pointed out something interesting to me recently. He said that it was actually considered somewhat impolite for girls in Japan to go out without make-up on. To an American, it seems kind of extreme, but I can see it happening. However, he was only from one part of Japan (and I don't remember which, but I think it was Tokyo), so I was wondering ii it was a local thing or a nationwide thing?
www.bananamonkeyninja.com
The only webcomic endorsed by Banana Monkey Ninja
User avatar
Dehitay
 
Posts: 1010
Joined: Fri 09.08.2006 8:36 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas, USA
Native language: English
Gender: Male

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby Harisenbon » Tue 09.16.2008 12:11 am

Pretty nation-wide as far as I'm aware.
I know that my wife and her friends always feel awkward if they're not wearing makeup.

Especially at work, it is said that lipstick is a woman's necktie.
Want to learn Japanese the right way? How about for free?
Ippatsu // Japanesetesting.com
User avatar
Harisenbon
 
Posts: 2964
Joined: Tue 06.14.2005 3:24 am
Location: Gifu, Japan
Native language: (poor) English

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby chikara » Tue 09.16.2008 12:12 am

I don't know about Japan but it is certainly not an issue in this country.

At what age must a "girl" start wearing make-up in order to be polite and does it last for the rest of her life or is there a cut off age?

Sounds a bit like a marketing ploy by Shiseido to me :P
Don't complain to me that people kick you when you're down. It's your own fault for lying there
User avatar
chikara
 
Posts: 3577
Joined: Tue 07.11.2006 10:48 pm
Location: Australia (SA)
Native language: English (Australian)
Gender: Male

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby chikara » Tue 09.16.2008 12:14 am

Harisenbon wrote:Pretty nation-wide as far as I'm aware.
I know that my wife and her friends always feel awkward if they're not wearing makeup.

Especially at work, it is said that lipstick is a woman's necktie.

That is interesting.
Don't complain to me that people kick you when you're down. It's your own fault for lying there
User avatar
chikara
 
Posts: 3577
Joined: Tue 07.11.2006 10:48 pm
Location: Australia (SA)
Native language: English (Australian)
Gender: Male

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby two_heads_talking » Tue 09.16.2008 9:15 am

Harisenbon wrote:Pretty nation-wide as far as I'm aware.
I know that my wife and her friends always feel awkward if they're not wearing makeup.

Especially at work, it is said that lipstick is a woman's necktie.


All I know is that there are many that wear make-up that should scale back.. When a line of make-up is visible from 20 feet or so, it starts to hit the realm of kabuki makeup.
User avatar
two_heads_talking
 
Posts: 4137
Joined: Thu 04.06.2006 11:03 am
Native language: English

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby becki_kanou » Tue 09.16.2008 10:04 am

At the eikaiwa where I used to work one of my female Japanese co-workers told me that it was required that they wear make-up. I don't know if it was actually in the dress code for the Japanese workers (it wasn't for foreign staff), or if it was one of those unstated understandings, but I never saw a female co-worker without.

I'll admit I've been surprised at exactly how much some girls wear though after going to an onsen together and seeing their 素顔 for the first time. Sometimes they look like a completely different person.
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。
User avatar
becki_kanou
 
Posts: 3402
Joined: Sat 04.19.2008 10:09 pm
Location: Hyogo, Japan
Skype chat: yes_becki
Native language: U.S. English, 米語
Gender: Female

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby two_heads_talking » Tue 09.16.2008 12:56 pm

becki_kanou wrote:
I'll admit I've been surprised at exactly how much some girls wear though after going to an onsen together and seeing their 素顔 for the first time. Sometimes they look like a completely different person.


I misread that kanji the first time.. I thought it was 素肌. I was thinking, no wonder they looked like a completely different person.. lol. Sorry, Becki, I am completely emberassed that I misread that..

Now that I have washed the egg off my face, I will say I completely agree with you. And I think it goes beyond business girls. When the girls or mothers that stayed home would go out, they too would paint themselves up very heavily.
User avatar
two_heads_talking
 
Posts: 4137
Joined: Thu 04.06.2006 11:03 am
Native language: English

Re: Make-up and politeness

Postby becki_kanou » Tue 09.16.2008 10:35 pm

Since we're on the topic, I just wanted to rant a bit.

It seems like some girls, (especially ギャル) have no clue about what is socially appropriate and do their entire face on the train. Now, a little bit is fine, and I'll sometimes reapply lipstick or whatever, but these girls come on the train with nothing on, and then proceed to do their whole face from the ground up. Foundation, shadow, eyeliner, blush, mascara, lipstick, gloss etc. etc.

It's kind of gross and also seems dangerous, for example when the train is swaying and they're using one of those eyelash-curlers that looks like a medieval torture device. I've even seen a girl using a portable curling iron on the train which has the potential to be dangerous to other passengers rather than just her own dumb self. What really took the cake though was seeing two ギャル sitting together at a cafe and curling their hair at...the...table... EEEEwwww
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。
User avatar
becki_kanou
 
Posts: 3402
Joined: Sat 04.19.2008 10:09 pm
Location: Hyogo, Japan
Skype chat: yes_becki
Native language: U.S. English, 米語
Gender: Female


Return to Culture and Info about living in Japan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 5 guests