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More practice ^_^

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More practice ^_^

Postby kentaku_sama » Mon 04.20.2009 12:52 am

Okay these are helping alot, here is some more practice sentences I made up in my head and spoke then I wrote them on here for correction.

すしはおいしいなら、 ラメンよくです。  This sentence kind of looks dumb but It's supposed to mean
"Even though sushi is delicious, Ramen is better. or (I like it better)" I'm not sure if "よく" is a particle or not.

道におばあさんはおどっていますのが、見てか? 私のおばあさんです。 
"See that old lady dancing in the road, she's my grandma" 

子供: はは   Child: Mommy
お母さん: はい、 なに? mother: Yes, what is it?
子供: 夕飯を作っていますか? Are you making supper (now)?
お母さん: ううん。 今、 皿を洗って。 no, Right now I'm washing dishes.
子供: 何時ですか? When will you make it?
お母さん: 8時半に    8:30


男の子1: おおい!
男の子2: hmm、 なに
男の子1: あなたは物語の悲しい犬を聞きましたか?
男の子2: はい
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby tōkai devotee » Mon 04.20.2009 4:54 am

kentaku_sama wrote:すしはおいしいなら、 ラメンよくです。  


Firstly, it's a long sound - 'raamen', ラーメン.
What you have written there says in English, "If sushi is delicious, ramen is often."
To say what you want to say,try something like this...

すしはおいしいですが、ラーメンのほうが好きです。OR ラーメンのほうがいいです。

The second one, you wrote,
道におばあさんはおどっていますのが、見てか? 私のおばあさんです。 
"See that old lady dancing in the road, she's my grandma" 

I would say, 道におどっているおばあさんが見えますか?

I hope that's helped! :D
I'm not confident enough to handle your little dialogues. I'm sure someone else will come along and help!
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby Kakads » Mon 04.20.2009 9:03 am

男の子1: あなたは物語の悲しい犬を聞きましたか?
Did you mean 'Have you listened to the story of the sad dog?',
if so, you have the words positioned around the の wrong.
Should be 悲しい犬の物語, the story belonging to the sad dog.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby kentaku_sama » Mon 04.20.2009 11:16 am

Ok How about this one:

デーブノートを好きでも、 ナルトとブリーチのほうが大好きです。  "I like Death note, but I love naruto and bleach better."
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby Kakads » Mon 04.20.2009 12:11 pm

This would be a better way of saying it:
デスノート好きです、 ナルトとブリーチのほうが大好きです。
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby kentaku_sama » Mon 04.20.2009 9:39 pm

Woah, Ok... That's a strange concept to me right now, may'be I'll understand it once I work though a textbook.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby becki_kanou » Tue 04.21.2009 1:49 am

kentaku_sama wrote:Okay these are helping alot, here is some more practice sentences I made up in my head and spoke then I wrote them on here for correction.

すしはおいしいなら、 ラメンよくです。  This sentence kind of looks dumb but It's supposed to mean
"Even though sushi is delicious, Ramen is better. or (I like it better)" I'm not sure if "よく" is a particle or not.

すしはおいしいけど、ラーメンの方が好きです。


道におばあさんはおどっていますのが、見てか? 私のおばあさんです。 
"See that old lady dancing in the road, she's my grandma"
 
Not sure what grammar point you are trying to practice here. Relative clauses maybe?
In that case 道で躍っているおばあさんは見えますか?

If you want to describe someone/something with a whole sentence you can just tack that sentence onto the noun.
ラーメンを食べている男の子= The boy eating ramen
あそこに座っている猫= The cat sitting over there
あの帽子をかぶっている小学生=That school kid wearing a cap

then finish the sentence with whatever else you want

ラーメンを食べている男の子はうちのおいこです。= The boy eating ramen is my nephew.
あそこに座っている猫は近所で一番大きい猫です. The cat sitting over there is the largest cat in the neighborhood.
あの帽子をかぶっている小学生は迷子みたいですね。 = That school kid wearing a cap seems to be lost.


子供: はは   Child: Mommy
お母さん: はい、 なに? mother: Yes, what is it?
子供: 夕飯を作っていますか? Are you making supper (now)?
お母さん: ううん。 今、 皿を洗って。 no, Right now I'm washing dishes.
子供: 何時ですか? When will you make it?
お母さん: 8時半に    8:30

Kids usually call their mothers お母さん、母さん、お母ちゃん、or 母ちゃん when talking to them. はは is used when talking about your own mother to someone outside your family.

皿を洗って should be 皿を洗っています。 The bare て-form turns it into a command.

何時ですか? means what time is it now. You should say something like いつ作りますか?


男の子1: おおい!
男の子2: hmm、 なに
男の子1: あなたは物語の悲しい犬を聞きましたか?
男の子2: はい


おおい is quite rude, kind of like "Hey, you!" Kids do talk this way, but they wouldn't then suddenly switch to ます form, and they would never call another kid あなた. It's in fact, quite rare for people to address others as あなた. Most people prefer to address others by their name or title, or simply nothing at all.

If you want to say "the sad story about the dog" it should be 「犬の悲しい話」 or 「悲しい犬の話」
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby astaroth » Tue 04.21.2009 11:21 am

becki_kanou wrote:
kentaku_sama wrote:Okay these are helping alot, here is some more practice sentences I made up in my head and spoke then I wrote them on here for correction.

すしはおいしいなら、 ラメンよくです。  This sentence kind of looks dumb but It's supposed to mean
"Even though sushi is delicious, Ramen is better. or (I like it better)" I'm not sure if "よく" is a particle or not.


すしはおいしいけど、ラーメンの方が好きです。

I wonder, given the actual sentence in English couldn't it be something like:
寿司は美味しくても、ラメンの方が好きです。

Just wondering about the rephrasing ...
becki_kanou wrote:おおい is quite rude, kind of like "Hey, you!" Kids do talk this way, but they wouldn't then suddenly switch to ます form, and they would never call another kid あなた. It's in fact, quite rare for people to address others as あなた. Most people prefer to address others by their name or title, or simply nothing at all.

Which reminds of a quote from a dorama I watched (Long Vacation if of any interest)
「あなたじゃない。み・な・み、ね!」
Or something like this ... please correct ... I'm going by memory on this one ...
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby LordOfTheFlies » Wed 04.22.2009 6:48 pm

astaroth wrote:
becki_kanou wrote:
kentaku_sama wrote:Okay these are helping alot, here is some more practice sentences I made up in my head and spoke then I wrote them on here for correction.

すしはおいしいなら、 ラメンよくです。  This sentence kind of looks dumb but It's supposed to mean
"Even though sushi is delicious, Ramen is better. or (I like it better)" I'm not sure if "よく" is a particle or not.


すしはおいしいけど、ラーメンの方が好きです。

I wonder, given the actual sentence in English couldn't it be something like:
寿司は美味しくても、ラメンの方が好きです。

I really can't explain why but even though your sentence is also grammatically correct it sounds very unnatural. On top of it おいしい is almost never written with kanji. It's not wrong to do so, I'm just letting you know because people might find it strange :p

すしはおいしいけど、ラーメンの方が好きです。
and
すしはおいしいですが、ラーメンの方がすきです。 (extra polite)
sound better to me.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby astaroth » Wed 04.22.2009 7:36 pm

LordOfTheFlies wrote:I really can't explain why but even though your sentence is also grammatically correct it sounds very unnatural. On top of it おいしい is almost never written with kanji. It's not wrong to do so, I'm just letting you know because people might find it strange :p

Thanks. I kinda felt the same, but I was wondering whether the grammar was right and whether 〜ても would have meant what the OP was asking for, that is "even though". It was more about literal translation than naturalness, but thanks again to point that out.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby kentaku_sama » Thu 04.23.2009 12:38 am

How about this:

私のあもを食べた人が大嫌い!!   "I hate the guy who ate my rice cake!" or is it:
私のあもを人は食べましたことが大嫌いです!!  ( A more polite form. )
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby LordOfTheFlies » Thu 04.23.2009 6:37 am

astaroth wrote:
LordOfTheFlies wrote:I really can't explain why but even though your sentence is also grammatically correct it sounds very unnatural. On top of it おいしい is almost never written with kanji. It's not wrong to do so, I'm just letting you know because people might find it strange :p

Thanks. I kinda felt the same, but I was wondering whether the grammar was right and whether 〜ても would have meant what the OP was asking for, that is "even though". It was more about literal translation than naturalness, but thanks again to point that out.

Well, literally translating something isn't something you should be doing when you're translating Japanese. If you want a proper translation anyway. Translating Japanese to English is much more difficult than for example Spanish and German which are different languages but still have somewhat similar grammatical constructions and a considerable amount of vocabulary with the same etymology as English.

kentaku_sama:
Do you mean もち?

Either way your first sentence is right except for the word you're using for rice cake.
私のもちを食べた人が大嫌い! = "I hate the person who ate my rice cake!"

However the polite version would look more like this but still hold the same meaning.
私のもちを食べた人が大嫌いです!

In many cases when you're speaking politely you don't have to change the original sentence except for ending it with a ~ます form or です. However that's not always the case because there's some words that you might use when speaking casually that can be seen as kind of rough when you're talking to a complete stranger.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby astaroth » Thu 04.23.2009 11:54 am

LordOfTheFlies wrote:Well, literally translating something isn't something you should be doing when you're translating Japanese. If you want a proper translation anyway. Translating Japanese to English is much more difficult than for example Spanish and German which are different languages but still have somewhat similar grammatical constructions and a considerable amount of vocabulary with the same etymology as English.

I completely agree with you, though also from other European languages to English (and viceversa).
An Italian friend of mine told us once of one of her students saying in class "voglio avere tanti capretti", which translates as "I want to have many kids" though that capretto is kid as a young goat and never as a child. And there are many other examples of this.
But I'm digressing. Sorry.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby kentaku_sama » Thu 04.23.2009 12:03 pm

In many cases when you're speaking politely you don't have to change the original sentence except for ending it with a ~ます form or です. However that's not always the case because there's some words that you might use when speaking casually that can be seen as kind of rough when you're talking to a complete stranger.


Oh yeah, I would NEVER use casual talk to a stranger because I've heard that casual is more like family/ close friends talk you don't use it when asking for direction or something to someone you've never seen in your life.
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Re: More practice ^_^

Postby nekoninja » Sat 07.04.2009 11:03 pm

kentaku_sama wrote:道におばあさんはおどっていますのが、見てか? 私のおばあさんです。 
"See that old lady dancing in the road, she's my grandma"

In the second sentence, since you are talking about your own grandma to someone else (presumably outside the family), you should use そぼ rather than おばあさん.
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