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Deeper meaning.

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Deeper meaning.

Postby mongol800 » Mon 07.13.2009 3:32 am

Hey, we all know how the language basically works. We all, whether fluent or beginner, know that a "deep" meaning is held in the Japanese language.

How would you say team player?

Not like a "baseball player" but like works well within a team.
部局に色々な事態を扱える

able to deal with various situations in a section??

That sort of conveys the meaning...
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Re: Deeper meaning.

Postby jt » Mon 07.13.2009 9:16 am

mongol800 wrote:We all, whether fluent or beginner, know that a "deep" meaning is held in the Japanese language.

As "deep" a meaning as is held in any language, I suppose.

How would you say team player?

協調性(きょうちょうせい)のある人 would work here, I'd think.

You also see チームプレイ as a loanword from time to time, so a phrase like チームプレイができる would likely get the point across as well.
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Re: Deeper meaning.

Postby Bucko » Mon 07.13.2009 12:33 pm

Hey, we all know how the language basically works. We all, whether fluent or beginner, know that a "deep" meaning is held in the Japanese language.


What makes you think that? Because Japanese people and Japanophile gaijin say so? Repeat after me, all languages are the same. All languages are the same. All langauges are the same.

How would you say team player?


チーム・プレー is most common. Yes, Japanese is so deep that it has to resort to using English.
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Re: Deeper meaning.

Postby Harisenbon » Mon 07.13.2009 8:19 pm

Bucko wrote:What makes you think that? Because Japanese people and Japanophile gaijin say so? Repeat after me, all languages are the same. All languages are the same. All langauges are the same.


While I as well disagree with the OP, that doesn't mean you have to be rude about it.

Also, I highly contest the fact that all languages are the same. ;)
Each language is generally tailored to being able to easily and succinctly express what values/ideas are important to that culture. Which is why there are phrases in English that are hard to express in Japanese, as well as the reverse (or between any two languages for that matter)
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Re: Deeper meaning.

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Mon 07.13.2009 8:37 pm

Harisenbon wrote:Each language is generally tailored to being able to easily and succinctly express what values/ideas are important to that culture.


I don't know about that. Sometimes what ideas or values are important to the culture are expressed non-easily and non-succinctly, like the very complicated politeness system of Japanese or the way that longer utterances are often politer (e.g. 高い vs. ちょっと高いと思いますけど...) And the grammatical elements of the language are unlikely to be culturally related at all. But of course culture has some effect on language use.

It's true in a basic sense that you can express anything in one language that you can in another, but not necessarily with equal brevity or naturalness.

I don't understand what the OP means by "a "deep" meaning is held in the Japanese language", but it sounds a little suspicious to me.
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Re: Deeper meaning.

Postby Harisenbon » Mon 07.13.2009 10:25 pm

Yudan Taiteki wrote:like the very complicated politeness system of Japanese or the way that longer utterances are often politer (e.g. 高い vs. ちょっと高いと思いますけど...)


Getting into politeness though is a whole 'nother can of worms.

I've noticed that in English as well as Japanese (and I assume other languages as well) the more you talk, in general, the more polite you are being.

"We should not go there."
"I'm not quite sure that going there would be the best idea."

It makes me wonder if there are any languages where speaking politely is actually easier/shorter than speaking casually?
I have a feeling not, because if it is easier to speak politely, what's the point of speaking casually?
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