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Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby AJBryant » Mon 08.31.2009 9:14 am

Mr.Paper wrote:Hello! Haven't been on in a while due to school.


Oh, is THAT why...

:twisted:

Well tell me how good my grammar is, thanks. And sentence forming.


On the former, not very good. On the latter... also not very good.

It would help, in future, if you want sentences *checked*, that you provide the original intent. You might be correctly saying ONE thing, while incorrectly saying what you MEANT to say. It is also possible that you might be producing gibberish, and we would have no idea of how to help with what your intent may have been.

Tony
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby Minarai » Mon 08.31.2009 2:40 pm

astaroth wrote:Though as far as I understand, kirai comes out rather stronger than "I don't like". It's more like "I hate" or "I detest". (In italiano potrebbe essere qualcosa del tipo "mi fa schifo" che come sai è abbastanza forte ...)


Hello Astaroth!
In my grammar book there's written that you can use it (kirai) when you want to say "I don't like"...

But now that you make me think about the usage of "kirai" I agree with you.
Maybe きらい is used preferably in situations like "I hate" or "I detest" as you said!
Thank you!

(Essì, sarebbe troppo forte. C'è una differenza abissale tra il dire "non mi piace!" e "mi fa schifo!". Grazie per avermi fatto notare questa cosa :D )

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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby furrykef » Tue 09.01.2009 8:02 am

JaySee wrote:
Yudan Taiteki wrote:This has to be either:
furansu ga hanasenai (I can't speak French)
or
furansu o hanasanai (I don't speak French -- this does not express ability like it does in English, it just means that you do not perform the action of speaking French.)


And you have to stick "-go" behind furansu to specify you're talking about the French language, instead of the country.


Sure you can say "furansu ga hanasanai".

Mr. Paperさんは昨日、フランスに電話をしようとしたが、フランスは人じゃなくて国なので、話さない。

:mrgreen:

(Edited for grammar as per below)
Last edited by furrykef on Tue 09.01.2009 4:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby astaroth » Tue 09.01.2009 12:11 pm

furrykef wrote:フランスは人じゃなくむしろ国(だ)

I don't understand this bit ... :oops:
ー 流光 ー

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小  見獄の
林  かの中
一  な上は
茶   の 
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby furrykef » Tue 09.01.2009 12:14 pm

Here it is in English, with the part you're confused about in bold: "Mr. Paper-san tried to call France yesterday, but since France is not a person, but a country, it doesn't talk."

It's entirely possible that I said it wrong or unnaturally. I was just being silly. :P

(In fact, the first time I posted it, I had actually written "France is not a language, but a country"... now that doesn't make sense. ^^; Guess it was a Freudian slip...)

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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby becki_kanou » Tue 09.01.2009 12:17 pm

astaroth wrote:
furrykef wrote:フランスは人じゃなくむしろ国(だ)

I don't understand this bit ... :oops:


Me either, what were you trying to say here? むしろ means "not A (as you mightexpect) but rather B (which may be a bit surprising)".
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby furrykef » Tue 09.01.2009 12:23 pm

I gave the answer in the post above yours. If you know a better way to say it, well, by all means... ^^;
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby Hyperworm » Tue 09.01.2009 12:36 pm

Doesn't it work fine if you just omit the むしろ? :)
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby becki_kanou » Tue 09.01.2009 12:41 pm

furrykef wrote:I gave the answer in the post above yours. If you know a better way to say it, well, by all means... ^^;

Weird... I totally didn't see that post.

And as Hyperworm said, it works without the むしろ, but it is a weird sentence. :lol:
そうだ、嬉しいんだ、生きる喜び!
例え胸の傷が痛んでも。
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby Yudan Taiteki » Tue 09.01.2009 12:43 pm

Hyperworm wrote:Doesn't it work fine if you just omit the むしろ? :)


Yeah; I think the むしろ is a little more formal/written; 人じゃなくて国だ is fine.
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby furrykef » Tue 09.01.2009 4:53 pm

becki_kanou wrote:And as Hyperworm said, it works without the むしろ


Yeah, see, this is why dictionaries aren't all that reliable for looking up how to say stuff. :lol: I looked up "Not an X but a Y" in Pocket Kenkyusha and that's what it had -- even had an example sentence that didn't seem that different from what I was trying to say...

but it is a weird sentence. :lol:


Yeah, but then, so is "furansu ga hanasanai" ;)

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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby Astral Abraxas » Fri 10.30.2009 8:26 pm

Learn hiragana/katakana if you still haven't. Then you wouldn't make mistakes like
seeing suki as an i-adjective...

miruku ga sukkunai na


ミルクが好きじゃない
miruku ga suki ja nai
(I) don't like milk

miruku wa yokunai shinjiru


信じる(shinjiru) is a verb that means "to believe" or "have faith in"
I was practicing grammar awhile back with it so I have an example sentence:
日本人は生きる目的が天皇に仕えることだと信じた。 (nihonjin ha ikiru mokuteki
ga tenou ni tsukaeru koto da to shinjita) Which means "Japanese believed
the purpose of life was to serve the emperor." That's how 信じる(shinjiru) is
used.

ミルクがよくないと思う。
miruku ga yokunai to omou
(I) think milk isn't good.

kyou wa koukou e ikanai

今日は高校へ行かない
Kyou ha koukou e ikanai
(I) won't go to high school today.

You may want to consider the use of 学校(gakkou) instead. 高校(koukou) isn't wrong
but I'm just thinking of the scenario that you're probably thinking of. 高校(koukou)
just seems highly specific for most situations in my opinion. When I was a high school
student I wouldn't ever say "I'm not going to high school tomorrow"... I would always
just say "I'm not going to school tomorrow"


You did your contrasting with は(wa) wrong in the next two. They are both negative.
what exactly are you trying to contrast? You should try having one in the negative
and one in the positive. I'm going to put them into 1 sentence.

tamanegi wa taberu koto ga sukkunai na. soshite, tamago wa taberu koto ga sukkunai na


You tried to say "I don't like to eat onions. And then, I don't like to eat eggs". That doesn't even
really make much sense in English to be honest. Let's try doing it this way:

たまねぎは食べることが好きじゃないけど、たまごは食べることが好きだ。
tamanegi ha taberu koto ga suki ja nai kedo, tamago ha taberu koto ga suki desu.
I don't like to eat onions but, I like to eat eggs.

Here you are contrasting eggs with onions in a way that makes sense. Before you were
contrasting them in a way that didn't make much sense.

kono bideo geimu ga sukkunai na


このテレビゲームが好きじゃない。
kono terebi ge-mu ga suki ja nai.
(I) don't like this video game.

furansu ga hanasanai


フランス語が話せない
furansugo ga hanasenai

hanasenai is the negative-potential of hanasu. Which I believe is what you really wanted to say. Also don't forget to append the -go to the name of the country to specify that you're talking about the language.
フランス語を話さない
furansugo o hanasai

isn't incorrect but it means "I won't" or "I don't speak french"... Nothing about your ability. Which is something I think you didn't intend.

One last note: when I see -na I think either "negative-imperative" or "kansai-ben of ne" either of which would be wrong in all of the cases you used. I think you meant なあ(naa). Please do a long a sound when doing that :)

I realize this is a slight necro-post however the rules state that it's ok to necro-post if what you have to say contributes to the topic. I believe this contributes. So don't jump down my throat lol -_-
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby furrykef » Fri 10.30.2009 8:54 pm

Astral Abraxas wrote:I realize this is a slight necro-post however the rules state that it's ok to necro-post if what you have to say contributes to the topic. I believe this contributes. So don't jump down my throat lol -_-


OK, I won't jump down your throat, but I do think pretty much everything you said has been said already... ^^;
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Re: Japanese sentences in the Informal Present Negative.

Postby Astral Abraxas » Fri 10.30.2009 9:24 pm

I was expecting that from someone lol. I repeated a lot because I wanted everything to be summed up into 1 post. Also there are slight additions here and there.
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