Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Japanese, general discussion on the language
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Mike Cash
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Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by Mike Cash » Sun 07.25.2010 12:40 am

I took this photo of the back of a tombstone in a small private cemetery in rural Nagano Prefecture just especially to share with the Japanese learners here. There are two kanji visible which were formerly in common use (at least in inscriptions) and which are no longer used. You should be able to figure out both their readings and their meanings purely from context if you have studied kanji even a little bit.

Image
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phreadom
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by phreadom » Sun 07.25.2010 7:56 am

I tried to clean the pic up a little Mike, but I'm not sure about some of the lower kanji due to my beginner level not being familiar enough with more than the elementary level kanji.
kanji4.png
kanji4.png (49.56 KiB) Viewed 3123 times
Hopefully this might make it a little easier for people to read. :) Please let me know which ones I messed up.
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by Hyperworm » Sun 07.25.2010 3:23 pm

Spoiler:
Kanji for 20 and 30?
I think this has come up here in the past actually :lol:
20 here is different again to the form I knew of it (廿)...
And presumably the one at the top is a variant of 仝? (looks like ユ below instead of エ ...)
fun translation snippets | need something translated?
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Hektor6766
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by Hektor6766 » Sun 07.25.2010 10:36 pm

Considering the context, I'd say the top one is an old form of .

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Mike Cash
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by Mike Cash » Mon 07.26.2010 5:31 am

Thanks very much, Phreadom. That is an excellent job and I am sure it is much easier for people to make out than the photo. It was in a very difficult spot to try to get any photo of it at all....much less a good one.

I believe that I posted a photo containing one of the two kanji earlier this year or perhaps last year. But we get some new people coming in so I thought it wouldn't hurt to give it another go.

One of the points I wanted to make with this photo is that sometimes it is possible to figure out the meaning (and sometimes the reading) of kanji one has never seen before. I thought this would be a good sample to provide some learners with an opportunity to experience that for themselves.
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by NileCat » Thu 07.29.2010 4:06 pm

Hektor6766 wrote:Considering the context, I'd say the top one is an old form of .
Correct answer is:
Spoiler:
仝 = 同 (どう)・・・古い漢字です。今は使われません。
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E4%BB%9D
一番右の「明治」を繰り返して書くのと同じですね。

「明治      ~年」
「同じく(明治) ~年」
「同じく(明治) ~年」

Hektor6766
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by Hektor6766 » Thu 07.29.2010 8:25 pm

おっしゃりたいことは分かります。

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Mike Cash
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Re: Some Old Yet Simple Kanji

Post by Mike Cash » Sat 07.31.2010 6:43 am

NileCat wrote:
Hektor6766 wrote:Considering the context, I'd say the top one is an old form of .
Correct answer is:
Spoiler:
仝 = 同 (どう)・・・古い漢字です。今は使われません。
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E4%BB%9D
一番右の「明治」を繰り返して書くのと同じですね。

「明治      ~年」
「同じく(明治) ~年」
「同じく(明治) ~年」
It would be more accurate to say it is no longer in general use. I know I saw it on items produced for the funerals of my wife's parents. I doubt that it sees much (if any) use outside the funeral industry, though.
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