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is coming to

Postby themonk » Mon 11.22.2010 2:22 pm

'Tom Schneider is coming to Japan.' I cannot get the 'to' part.
Last edited by themonk on Wed 08.03.2011 7:25 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Tom Schneider is coming to japan

Postby micahcowan » Mon 11.22.2010 5:28 pm

You can't rely on the particle to tell you which of ikimasu or kimasu is being used, particularly since "ni" is often used as a drop-in replacement for "e" (except when "e" is used only to convey a direction, and not a destination at which one will finish arriving). Kimasu frequently takes e, and ikimasu can certainly take ni, so... yeah.

A little more practice listening should set it straight, though... "e ikimasu" isn't really hard for me to hear, if the "i" is actually pronounced. Even if it's not, after both "e" or "ni" you would at least hear a slight prolongation; after "ni" it can almost sound a little sing-songy, rising to a slightly higher pitch on the "i" before continuing to the "kimasu".

Finally, distinguishing them is almost completely unnecessary anyway. "kimasu" is used to mean "move from where you are to somewhere near or related to me or my circle", whereas "ikimasu" is used to mean pretty much any other set of movements. So the origin and destination should make it pretty clear which was used, and if it doesn't, then it probably didn't really matter which was said anyway.
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Re: Tom Schneider is coming to japan

Postby themonk » Sat 11.27.2010 10:18 am

Dear Micah ~
Thank you so-o-o much for your answer.

It was very thorough. I felt flattered receiving an answer like yours, addressing my hypothesis and from other angles. You sound like someone with a good grasp of the language. That is important and really benefits people like me, the beginners.

Thank you for taking the time to write. I am saving this, for later (i am guessing that in a few lessons down the road, my ears would be able to pick up more nuances. I still cannot tell the diffeence now. But at that time, i should be able to apply the valuable tips you offered.)

micahcowan wrote:You can't rely on the particle to tell you which of ikimasu or kimasu is being used, particularly since "ni" is often used as a drop-in replacement for "e" (except when "e" is used only to convey a direction, and not a destination at which one will finish arriving). Kimasu frequently takes e, and ikimasu can certainly take ni, so... yeah.

A little more practice listening should set it straight, though... "e ikimasu" isn't really hard for me to hear, if the "i" is actually pronounced. Even if it's not, after both "e" or "ni" you would at least hear a slight prolongation; after "ni" it can almost sound a little sing-songy, rising to a slightly higher pitch on the "i" before continuing to the "kimasu".

Finally, distinguishing them is almost completely unnecessary anyway. "kimasu" is used to mean "move from where you are to somewhere near or related to me or my circle", whereas "ikimasu" is used to mean pretty much any other set of movements. So the origin and destination should make it pretty clear which was used, and if it doesn't, then it probably didn't really matter which was said anyway.
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Re: Tom Schneider is coming to japan

Postby micahcowan » Sat 11.27.2010 6:08 pm

oldwordstudy wrote:Dear Micah ~
Thank you so-o-o much for your answer.

It was very thorough. I felt flattered receiving an answer like yours, addressing my hypothesis and from other angles. You sound like someone with a good grasp of the language. That is important and really benefits people like me, the beginners.


Heh, glad to help. But I think maybe it'd be more accurate to say that I have a good, solid grasp of certain isolated areas of the language, and big gaping gaps in others. :)
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