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English pet peeves

英語を勉強している方のためのフォーラムです。練習のために英語の文章を投稿してもかまわなく、英語の文法・語彙に関する質問をしてもけっこうです。

Re: English pet peeves

Postby micahcowan » Sun 11.07.2010 11:35 pm

Always base it on the pronunciation.

It's worth noting, though, that there are some writers/speakers who will precede words beginning with "h" with "an" instead of "a". I always assumed it depended on the pronunciation habits of the writer when I saw it.

For instance, "Thanks to an human act of kindness." I would write that with "a", not "an", but I wouldn't be shocked to come across it written that way. I would assume the writer pronounces "human" similar to "you+men", rather than (as I say it) "hew-men" with a hard h.

With acronyms, too, it's by pronunciation. "An HIV-like virus" ("an aitch..."), but "displayed in a HUD (heads-up display)" (because HUD is pronounced as a word rather than by its individual letters).

Looks like "an human" is pretty rare, though. Google only gave 172,000 results, versus 59,500,000 for "a human".
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby phreadom » Sun 11.07.2010 11:47 pm

Yeah, one of my pet peeves is when people pronounce SQL as a word (sequel)... so you have to decide whether to write "a SQL server" or "an SQL server" depending on which way you say it. :x I seem to run into things like this a lot when writing about computer stuff.

As for the "h" one... "an historic event" seems to be the cliché example of that, and it seems that people tend to think that saying "an historic event" rather than "a historic event" is a bit pretentious. ;) http://www.jimloy.com/language/historic.htm explains why.
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby chikara » Mon 11.08.2010 12:34 am

phreadom wrote:Yeah, one of my pet peeves is when people pronounce SQL as a word (sequel)... so you have to decide whether to write "a SQL server" or "an SQL server" depending on which way you say it. :x I seem to run into things like this a lot when writing about computer stuff.....

Saying SQL as "sequel" seems to be an American English thing. In my experience in this country SQL (ess queue ell), which is the official pronunciation, is usually used. SEQUEL is actually the name of a predecessor of SQL. It is therefore usually an SQL server or an SQL query or an SQL statement.

An SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and asks "Can I join you?" :P
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby phreadom » Mon 11.08.2010 1:50 am

I actually never heard it pronounced "sequel" until I went out to the west coast... and then I heard it a bit over in Detroit. But around these parts it's SQL (the 3 letters stated).

chikara wrote:An SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and asks "Can I join you?" :P


I belly laughed for a good several minutes. :lol: My girlfriend thought I'd lost my mind... so I explained the joke and she just did that *shake head, smile, and sigh a little* response. ;)

(And a friend I shared it with immediately responded with http://xkcd.com/327/ )
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby chikara » Mon 11.08.2010 4:39 am

phreadom wrote:... (And a friend I shared it with immediately responded with http://xkcd.com/327/ )

:D
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby tōkai devotee » Tue 12.07.2010 6:32 am

Thanks so much Chikara, for posting that link. Now I've just wasted 30 mins of my evening reading many of the jokes on that site!! :P
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby chikara » Tue 12.07.2010 8:57 am

tokai devotee wrote:Thanks so much Chikara, for posting that link. Now I've just wasted 30 mins of my evening reading many of the jokes on that site!! :P

どういたしまして、でもフリードムさんでした。  :)

久しぶりですね。
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby Infidel » Thu 01.27.2011 12:39 am

phreadom wrote:I actually never heard it pronounced "sequel" until I went out to the west coast... and then I heard it a bit over in Detroit. But around these parts it's SQL (the 3 letters stated).


I never heard it called sequel before I watched the Microsoft video. I guess that is how they want it pronounced.
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby NileCat » Thu 01.27.2011 1:01 am

Hi, Infidel!
Long time no see!
I might have said this before but, your avatar always makes me smile. :)
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby tuber97 » Thu 01.27.2011 1:11 am

phreadom wrote:Yeah, one of my pet peeves is when people pronounce SQL as a word (sequel)



Okay, I have never heard anybody say "ess-que-ell". I've always known it as "sequel". At first I thought I had read it wrong. Huh. I'm learning about English as well as Japanese!

:shock: :hammer: :arrow: :xtongue:
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby chikara » Thu 01.27.2011 1:54 am

tuber97 wrote:Okay, I have never heard anybody say "ess-que-ell". I've always known it as "sequel". .....

:shock:

I know Mircro$ofties like to use the term "Sequel Server" when actually talking about SQL Server but if SQL is pronounced CQL how is CQL (Common Query Language) pronounced? Or how about SMS, is that see-em-ess or maybe even see-em-see? Is an MC an em-ess? :think:

As I posted above I had always assumed that saying "sequel" for SQL was an American English thing.
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby Infidel » Thu 01.27.2011 6:23 pm

NileCat wrote:Hi, Infidel!
Long time no see!
I might have said this before but, your avatar always makes me smile. :)


久しぶり 

Thank you.

^^ I have to admit, it makes me smile about as often. It is definitely my favorite avatar.
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby ダラゴスちゃん » Tue 04.05.2011 1:32 pm

They're, their, there. People confuse them all the time...
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Re: RE: English pet peeves

Postby john2 » Tue 04.19.2011 6:13 am

Even wanting to post here, several issues;
the use of idioms/metaphors etc.
And greatings ‘hallo, hello, bye, aloha, こにちは, goodmorning, namaste…’.
Incorrect word order, the wrong negators in german.
Topicless discussions.
feeling obliged to talk to people.
people pointing their face at me all the time.
getting disturbed while looking for stuff in shops.

Some controversies.
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Re: English pet peeves

Postby KharismaticKayteh » Wed 11.16.2011 9:58 am

I have too many peeves to list.

The spelling "definately".
The pronunciation "exspecially" or "expresso".
The pronunciation "prostrate" instead of "prostate".

Also many colloquial things like "sup" and "ima" (seriously, "ima"? It apparently means "I'm gonna" which means "I'm going to...". How many contracted forms do we need)?!
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