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how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "demo"

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how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "demo"

Postby Shiroisan » Tue 05.03.2011 11:20 pm

There's demo as a "but"-sentence connector, and then there's also the particle "demo" http://home.inter.net/kenbutler/demojoshi.html which can be construed as many different meanings. However, I don't want mine to appear like either of those.


In the 2nd sentence below I'm trying to avoid making my "demo" appear like the particle "demo", but I don't know how...

I read magazines at home. I read magazines at the library as well.

うちでざっしをよみます.としょかんでもざっしをよみます.


What do I do? D:
Last edited by Shiroisan on Tue 05.03.2011 11:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby LordOfTheFlies » Tue 05.03.2011 11:48 pm

You simply don't have to worry about it. Japanese is context based and it's obvious that this でも is the combination of the で and も particles :)

The only thing I'd like to add is that the periods in Japanese are round circles, unlike our dots. They look like this 。
You should be able to find it in the same place as you find periods on any other keyboard.
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby Shiroisan » Tue 05.03.2011 11:57 pm

LordOfTheFlies wrote:You simply don't have to worry about it. Japanese is context based and it's obvious that this でも is the combination of the で and も particles :)

The only thing I'd like to add is that the periods in Japanese are round circles, unlike our dots. They look like this 。
You should be able to find it in the same place as you find periods on any other keyboard.



For some reason whenever I type a period the language bar switches to english, and then I have to manually switch back to Japanese to type the next sentence. This will prove very annoying once I start to type more in Japanese unless someone can tell me why this happens :pray:
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby squarezebra » Thu 05.05.2011 11:55 am

Reading うちでざっしをよみます.としょかんでもざっしをよみます, does the following really make much sense,

"I read magazines at home. However, I read magazines at the libray".

I really don't think that does make sense, and it's clear that the particle も he is giving that sense of also, which makes your sentence,

"I read magazines at home, but I also read them at the library.

As the above poster said, it's context that will help you differentiate で も from でも ^^
But as for your question, でも will always look like でも and it's up to the reader to differentiate how it should be parsed by looking at the context. ^^

As for your langauge bar, I suggest removing it completely and just having the Japanese language bar, and then using the key shortcuts to change input type.
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby Figurethree » Thu 05.05.2011 3:12 pm

As it was pointed out, it's heavily context based (which lemme tell you, can make things tough sometimes lol). For the record though, the でも that means "but" typically comes at the beginning of a sentence, sort of like how the English "however/but" can. That may help a bit.
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby Shiroisan » Thu 05.05.2011 11:01 pm

Thanks for the replies!

@squarezebra.

I'm not sure what you mean to remove it entirely. Have just a japanese language bar? Doesn't that mean that I'd never be able to type in english?

Or are you talking about a 3rd party language bar of sorts?
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby squarezebra » Fri 05.06.2011 3:21 am

Nope, I'm talking about turning your English Langauge bar in Windows OFF, and keep your Japanese language bar ON. You can then switch between roman input (abc) and kana (あいう) with a shortcut. If you're not American you might notice that the JP k/b setup moves a few of your keys like the " and @ for example, and the £ sign gets removed completely (but you can always cut/copy that from google).

I don't have an English Language Bar on my PC but I seem to be able to write in English^^
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby Shiroisan » Fri 05.06.2011 11:05 pm

That worked for me thanks! At first I thought the roman characters in the JP language bar were weird, but then I realized I had it set to full width instead of half width.

All is fixed :D
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby micahcowan » Fri 05.13.2011 7:56 pm

Technically, でも as the sentence starter "But" is... a sentence starter. It shouldn't follow other words, and that alone makes it clear that you're using "de mo" and not "demo"

However, it's not as if there aren't run-on/underpunctuated sentences. You might see a sentence like スペイン語はかんたんでも英語はむずかしい, in which you have basically two sentences joined by でも; however, it's still pretty obvious right away that it's not serving a "also at" or "also with" sort of function, and that its' joining two related clauses/sentences. So, as others have said, "don't worry about it." :)
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby Hyperworm » Fri 05.13.2011 11:50 pm

In a sentence like
スペイン語はかんたんでも英語はむずかしい
isn't the use of でも closer to
スペイン語はかんたんであっても、英語はむずかしい
than
スペイン語はかんたんでも英語はむずかしい
?
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby blutorange » Sat 05.14.2011 6:54 am

Hyperworm wrote:In a sentence like
isn't the use of でも closer to スペイン語はかんたんであっても、英語はむずかしい

If I understand correctly what you mean, then yes, that is what micahcowan probably meant.
micahcowan wrote:pretty obvious right away that it's not serving a "also at" or "also with" sort of function

Using this meaning, the sentence would translate to "*English is hard also with/at spain.", which makes no sense.
micahcowan wrote:its' joining two related clauses/sentences

It joins the two sentences "Spain is easy." and "English is hard.", using a concessive connection, "but, even though".

Then again, if you think about it, "〜であっても、…" and "〜。でも…" is really quite similar.
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Re: how to read particles de and mo instead of reading as "d

Postby micahcowan » Sat 05.14.2011 6:23 pm

I probably consider it approximately equidistant from both :)

After all, でも comes from the gerund of the copula (だ/である/です) + mo. I tend to think of sentence "starters" as でも and だから as sentence _enders_ that one is adding belatedly to a previous sentence (perhaps not even one spoken by the same speaker, but still)...
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