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Postby themonk » Fri 07.01.2011 9:30 pm

Dear Teachers~
I have a question concerning how to read the entries he provides at WWWJDIC.com.

For example:
匂う(P); 臭う(P) 【におう】 (v5u,vi) (1) (usu. 匂う) to be fragrant; to smell (good); (2) (usu. 臭う) to stink; to smell (bad); (3) to glow; to be bright; (P)

Does this mean that both 匂う(P); 臭う(P) are pronounced におう ? Which, in turn, means that two characters have the same pronunciation.
Last edited by themonk on Wed 08.03.2011 7:00 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: For those of you - veterans using Jim BREEN's Dictionary

Postby richvh » Sat 07.02.2011 12:57 am

oldwordstudy wrote:Dear Teachers~
I have a question concerning how to read the entries he provides at WWWJDIC.com.

For example:
匂う(P); 臭う(P) 【におう】 (v5u,vi) (1) (usu. 匂う) to be fragrant; to smell (good); (2) (usu. 臭う) to stink; to smell (bad); (3) to glow; to be bright; (P)

Does this mean that both 匂う(P); 臭う(P) are pronounced におう ? Which, in turn, means that two characters have the same pronunciation.


Correct.

Another example:
お母さん(P); 御母さん 【おかあさん】 (n) (hon) (See 母さん) mother; (P)

My conclusion would be that 母 matches romaji, かあ, and, 御母 corresponds with おかあ.


Also correct.
Richard VanHouten
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Re: For those of you - veterans using Jim BREEN's Dictionary

Postby micahcowan » Sat 07.02.2011 2:00 am

oldwordstudy wrote:Does this mean that both 匂う(P); 臭う(P) are pronounced におう ? Which, in turn, means that two characters have the same pronunciation.


Note that this is an extremely common situation. I have a file I generated from an older version of this dictionary (with a little manual post-processing), that has over 600 groups of verbs and adjectives that may be written with multiple possible kanji. See for example my article on the verb みる. Part of learning to write Japanese is gaining understanding of which character to use for which situation. (I see that EDICT has made big improvements in dealing with multiple-alternatives words... I need to adjust my file to take advantage of that...)
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thank you - - veterans using Jim BREEN's Dictionary

Postby themonk » Sat 07.02.2011 3:13 pm

@Teacher richvh~
Thank you for your input.

@Teacher Micahcowan~
I appreciate your comments, reminding me that this is what i am getting myself into (many characters with the same pronunciation, but each one is used for a potentially unique situation only) in studying Japanese.

Last time, when you replied, I already bookmarked your page Japanese Reader. In time, with a little bit more study, this section you mentioned will be a great mini-review on the word "see." Thank you.
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Re: For those of you - veterans using Jim BREEN's Dictionary

Postby LordOfTheFlies » Tue 07.05.2011 11:26 am

As for the 匂う vs 臭う issue it's just as how micahcowan explained it. I can go into detail and tell you that 匂う is used for good smells and 臭う is used for bad smells. Incidentally there's an i-adjective which uses the 臭 kanji, 臭い(くさい) which means smelly(in a bad way). If you're curious what specific implication a kanji has when there's several ones used for the same verb/adjective you can usually keep the IME list open in the Windows OS'es for a few seconds and it'll automatically open a window on the side with definitions explaining the specifics. This is unfortunately only in Japanese but you might be able to understand it.

As for the お母さん vs 御母さん issue it's a bit different since they both mean exactly the same thing. The only difference is that 御母さん uses the kanji for the honorific prefix お and these days it's generally written in kana. It's not wrong to write it as 御 and it's still done, just not as a commonly. There's also a general thumb rule for the reading of 御 as the honorific prefix, when it's followed by kunyomi it's usually read as a お and when it's followed by onyomi it's usually read as ご, but this isn't always true, just a general thumb rule :)
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