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Tadaima

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Tadaima

Postby nikhilkhullar » Mon 01.16.2012 5:45 am

Konnichiwa !

I am asking this just out of curiousity. I really like the warmth in the phrase exchange when someone gets back home, "Tadai ma" and a reply comes, "Okaeri"... I have usually seen this in Japanese movies and tv-series. But, while I was trying to relate this to India, I actually figured out that when we return home, we ring the bell. Then, someone comes to open the door and conversation follows that, which consequently means this exact situation seldom arises in our lives... :)

Are there not many thieves in Japan, I mean as per a normal man's perspective..? Are the doors not bolted usually, and people enter freely when they come back..?


Regards,
Nikhil
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Re: Tadaima

Postby Ema » Mon 01.16.2012 2:17 pm

Tadaima/Okaeri is used only with family or family-like members within your own home. So most people would open the door with their own key. yell out Tadaima! and listen for the response Okaeri.

So "I just got home!" with "welcome home" in response.

But ritual becomes ingrained, so even when a child may come home and ring the bell to get in, they will say Tadaima to the person who opens the door, and get the Okaeri in response. Or maybe reverse.

As for locking doors, depends where you live. Yeah there are thieves in Japan. Most would certainly lock the door if there were no one at home, unless you live in a small village where everyone knows one another and their possessions. Some people would leave the door unlocked when they are at home. Again, depends on where you live in Japan. Japanese being as polite as they are, even if the door were standing open, would ring the bell, knock or yell out "ojamashimasu" when visiting.
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Re: Tadaima

Postby Hektor6766 » Mon 01.16.2012 7:33 pm

There was a recent incident of an escaped convict, in Nagasaki I believe, who caused a great deal of concern for the local residents. One woman interviewed said, upon hearing of the escape, went back home to lock up her house. So it seems, barring unusual circumstances, some people even in larger cities feel safe enough to leave without locking their homes. Couldn't imagine doing that in the United States.
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Re: Tadaima

Postby nikhilkhullar » Mon 01.16.2012 8:12 pm

Hektor6766 wrote: ...Couldn't imagine doing that in the United States.


Same stands true for India. I can never imagine that, born and brought up in India...

Anyways, Tadaima/Okaeri is a real heart-warming gesture that I would like to incorporate to my 'home', though... :)


Cheers..!
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Re: Tadaima

Postby Hektor6766 » Tue 01.17.2012 12:09 am

BTW, the escaped convict incident was in Hiroshima. An unfortunate memory failure on my part. :blush:

I don't know if it is Shinto or Confucianism, or a fortunate remnant of the feudal era, but politeness, deference and hospitality are hallmarks of Japanese society. I hope the Japanese can protect those traditions against the strains of modern society.
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Re: Tadaima

Postby Ema » Wed 01.18.2012 2:11 pm

Well from a cultural standpoint. My friends in Canada do not leave their doors locked when they leave their homes. Even in metro Toronto which is the biggest city. But not all Canadians would do that. My friend explained to me that she would rather have people steal her things than to make her neighbors fell untrusted by locking her door when she leaves. I think it is the same in Japan. You want to put your faith in society and want to believe that your neighbors will help protect you. But again, depends on your neighborhood and the sense of community you have within it.

I think a great part of that stems from little things, for instance picking up garbage in the street. If all the neighbors are good about it then there is no litter and the neighborhood is better for everyone. On the other hand if you are seen littering, you are deeply frowned upon by "society's eyes". If your child throws away a wrapper in the street, you can be sure in the older neighborhoods one of the neighbors will report that incident to you.

In the US we could call that being nosey and not minding your own business, or being a snitch. On the other hand I am sitting in my living room in the USA barricaded in. However I have gone out and forgotten to lock the door and nothing bad happened. (that time) I also came home to find a guy putting all the stuff in my yard into his pickup and he tried to run me over when I asked him what I was doing. So I do not leave my doors open if I can. My neighborhood is not as nice as the neighborhood the lady lives in in Hiroshima. Wish it were.
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Re: Tadaima

Postby nikhilkhullar » Wed 01.18.2012 9:55 pm

Ema wrote:... Wish it were.


I would also love to live in such a society someday wherein I could keep the doors open... :)

Seems like a dream..!
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