Is and to be?

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netta1029
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Is and to be?

Post by netta1029 » Mon 02.21.2005 8:21 pm

I was wondering, is using 'aru' and 'iru' at the end of sentences,the same as saying that something is what it is? Is it always the same as with adjectives? For example, the car is red. *knows that I worded the question wrong*

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Mukade
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by Mukade » Mon 02.21.2005 8:39 pm

To say "X is Y," you use desu, like in your example, "The car is red," or when you say "I am an American."

Kuruma wa akai desu.
Watashi wa amerikajin desu.

---

Iru and Aru are more akin to the English "to exist." So you would say something like "There is a teacher" or "There is a computer" using Iru and Aru, respectively.

Sensei ga imasu.
Conpyuutaa ga arimasu.

Iru and Aru can also mean "to have," as in "I have a chihuahua" or "I have a new computer."

Chiwawa ga imasu.
Atarashii conpyuutaa ga arimasu.

---

**Remember that Iru is only used with living, animate things (people and animals) and Aru is used with non-living and inanimate things (objects and plants).

Does that make sense?

netta1029
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RE: Thanks.

Post by netta1029 » Mon 02.21.2005 8:48 pm

Yes 、that does make alot of sense to me. ども ありがとう。:D

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sakura
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by sakura » Sun 03.13.2005 12:31 pm

I have a question. What if something was dead? Like if a cat was 'not living' anymore. Would I say that it is now inanimate and then use aru?

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DragonKore
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by DragonKore » Sun 03.13.2005 4:51 pm

I think it would still be imasu because it was once an animate thing.

Diggity
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by Diggity » Thu 03.17.2005 2:18 pm

Well i am only taking a stab in the dark at this but I know that there is a present-negative verb tense (though I haven't gotten to verb conjugations yet to give an example.) I believe that you would use the same sentence but change the verb to that tense...

Sensei ga "Living"-past negative.

Anyone want to clarify (and hopefully tell me that my theory is correct.) :D

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Spaztick
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by Spaztick » Thu 03.17.2005 3:39 pm

Well, you'd use the negative present to show that the cat was dead (just like in English):

The cat is not alive.

Or you could use past tense:

The cat was alive.
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toryn
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by toryn » Fri 03.18.2005 11:33 pm

sakura wrote:
I have a question. What if something was dead? Like if a cat was 'not living' anymore. Would I say that it is now inanimate and then use aru?
Do you have an example of the sentence you want to make?

Watashi no neko ga shinde imasu.
My cat is dead.

Watashi no neko ga ikite imasen.
My cat is not alive.

Other than these, you probably won't have much to say about your dead cat, unless your dead cat's corpse is involved, but this is getting a bit macabre. :)
Diggity wrote:
Well i am only taking a stab in the dark at this but I know that there is a present-negative verb tense (though I haven't gotten to verb conjugations yet to give an example.) I believe that you would use the same sentence but change the verb to that tense...
Present-negative - do you just mean imasen?

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RE: Is and to be?

Post by Diggity » Sat 03.19.2005 1:58 am

;)If imasen is the present-negative tense then yes....

Like I said... I haven't gotten to any kind of verb conjugation... I just knew that that one particular conjugation existed in japanese.

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RE: Is and to be?

Post by Spaztick » Mon 03.21.2005 10:21 am

toryn wrote:

Other than these, you probably won't have much to say about your dead cat, unless your dead cat's corpse is involved, but this is getting a bit macabre. :)
Oooo, macabre (mac-cob ), getting complicated on us simpletons are you?
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by toryn » Tue 03.22.2005 12:53 am

You can blame my English texts for letting that slip into my language.:D

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KRed
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RE: Is and to be?

Post by KRed » Fri 03.25.2005 11:25 pm

To the best of my knowledge te iru and te aru vairy into 2 versions

FIRSTLY in the sense of referring to alive or dead objects.
eg Neko ga iru (there is a cat)
otooto ga iru (I have a brother)
ringo ga aru (there is an apple)

SECONDLY they vairy in the sense of reffering to the condition of an object.
te iru is used with intransitive verbs and te aru is used with transitive verbs.
eg Doa ga aite iru (the door is open)
Doa ga akete aru (someone has left the door open).
Both indicate an object is in a certain condition but te aru points to the fact that someone has left it like that.

I find the second version harder to fully understand. But there are probably many more I haven`t encountered yet.

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