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something FOR someone

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something FOR someone

Postby Edvent » Sun 03.19.2006 6:37 am

I need explanation of how to say "doing something FOR someone" or generally explanation of how to handle "for".
Here're 2 examples:

- "I'm gonna get a present for you."

and

- "This is for you!"

How can I translate these two scentences? Is there a special particle used?
(please write japanese answears only in kana...can't read kanji already...)

Thx in advance!
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby keatonatron » Sun 03.19.2006 10:59 am

-てあげる means to do something for some one.

プレゼントを買ってあげる.

You have to follow the あげる/くれる rules, so if someone did something for you you have to use -てくれる.

"This is for you" is a bit ambiguous. If it's an object (i.e. a present)... you can just say "あげる" (I'm giving it to you) or "プレゼントだよ!" (it's a present!) or if you need to be specific: "あなたにあげるプレゼントだよ" (it's a present I'm giving you)
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby richvh » Sun 03.19.2006 11:15 am

The example in my text of giving a gift has the giver saying 「これ、つまらないものですが、どうぞ。」(This, it's really nothing, but please [accept it].)
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby keatonatron » Sun 03.19.2006 11:49 am

That's pretty formal. Seems like overkill if it's between friends...
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby Harisenbon » Mon 03.20.2006 2:27 am

However, you should be careful with using 〜てあげる because it has a pushy (almost えらそう) feel to it. If you want to push the point home that you're doing something for someone, you should use it, but it's best not to use it when you are talking to the person in question.

あれが ほしかったら, わたしは おかねを かっしてあげる。
あれが ほしかったら, わたしは おかねを かすよ。
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby TrilinguisT » Mon 03.20.2006 3:44 am

tomodachi no tame ni purezento wo katta.

i bought a present FOR a friend.

for/ for the sake of = no tame ni
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby keatonatron » Mon 03.20.2006 8:02 am

That one implies that the friend asked you to buy the present with intent to give it to someone who isn't the friend.

The original question really needs to be clarified.

Is it "I bought a present for you because you're at work and can't go yourself" or is it "I bought this present to give to you"?
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby AJBryant » Mon 03.20.2006 12:26 pm

However, you should be careful with using 〜てあげる because it has a pushy (almost えらそう) feel to it.


True. But I rather believe that that kind of thing is really dependent on inflection and posture. The words are neutral to borderline -- how you say them can make it either endearing or insulting.

Sort of like "baka" ("baaaaaaaaaaaaaka" tends to sound like a friendly jape, while "baKA!" is an invitation to fisticuffs) and "shite kure" (said with pleading voice its actually moving and emotive, while said with a clipped, angry voice it sounds imperious).

As words alone, they're neutral. That's why surrounding context is often so critical.

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RE: something FOR someone

Postby Edvent » Mon 03.20.2006 1:01 pm

keatonatron wrote:
That one implies that the friend asked you to buy the present with intent to give it to someone who isn't the friend.

The original question really needs to be clarified.

Is it "I bought a present for you because you're at work and can't go yourself" or is it "I bought this present to give to you"?


Ok... hrmm... I wasn't expecting this to be such a difficult issue.
But I ment the second answear of yours:

- "I bought this present to give to you"

Thx for helping so far
Last edited by Edvent on Mon 03.20.2006 1:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: something FOR someone

Postby keatonatron » Mon 03.20.2006 1:12 pm

That's what I thought. What I said in the first reply is fine B)
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