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Trial Wrapup Idea

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Trial Wrapup Idea

Postby Txkun » Sat 03.25.2006 5:36 am

Line: 1

Original sentence:
高速道路を北に向かって走っていた私は、トイレに行きたくなったのでサービスエリアに立ち寄りました。

Splitting:
高速道路 を 北 に 向かって 走っていた 私は、トイレ に 行きたく なった ので サービスエリア に 立ち寄りました。

Vocabulary:
高速道路 【こうそくどうろ】 highway, freeway
北 【きた】 (n) North
走る 【はしる】 (v5r) to run
私 【わたし】 (adj-no,n) I, myself, private affairs
トイレ (n) toilet, restroom, bathroom, lavatory
行く 【いく】 (v5k-s) to go
ので (suf) that being the case, because of ...
成る 【なる】 (v5r) (uk) to become
サービスエリア service area
立ち寄る 【たちよる】 (v5r) to stop by, to drop in for a short visit

Grammar Rules:
行きたく is the adverb derived from 行きたい (want to go). Adverb us formed by dropping the final い and replacing it with a く
なった is the plain past form from the verb なる

Literally:
As for I, who was facing north and running on the highway, due to developing a desire to go to the toilet, stopped at a service area.

Translation:
Driving north on the highway, I stopped off at a service area because I had to go to the toilet.

Cultural Notes:

高速道路
There are a number of translations for this like
freeway, highway, interstate, speedway, and expressway.
I think that highway is the most universally understood, as freeway indicates that there are no tolls (Japanese highways are not free), and interstate suggests that you are traveling between states (no states in Japan, only prefectures).

トイレ
Depending on what country you're from, you're going to call it something diffierent. Loo, toilet, bathroom, restroom, lavatory,john, etc. However, I think that in this case toilet (or restroom) is the best translation, as it is devoid of colloquialism and does not have the connotation of a connecting bath (bathroom). Lavatory sounds too formal, and "I have to go to the lavatory" just doesn't strike me as natural.

サービスエリア
Just wanted to note that at least where I'm from in the northeastern US, we have both rest areas and service areas off our highways. Rest areas usually have a toilet and a few vending machines, while service areas generally have a gas station, a few fast food restaurants, and a convenience store. The "service area's" I've been to in Japan so far are more like what I think of as a service area than a rest area, with a gas station, places to eat, and of course places to buy おみやげ.

[spoiler]
Hi to all!
I had this idea of wrapping in a single message all the useful informations we are getting off the lines that coco (thanks!!) is posting.
What do you think? I just wrote this by cutting & pasting from all the great work you guys are doing. Do you think a thing like that will be useful? I, as a newbie, find useful to find all in a single post and so get a clear idea of what's going on.
If anyone interested I'll edit better this post and try to mantain this.
I'm trying my best to do a good work, if someone find any thing wrong please send me a PM I'll fix it ASAP. :D

[/spoiler]
Last edited by Txkun on Sat 03.25.2006 10:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Trial Wrapup Idea

Postby Txkun » Sat 03.25.2006 10:50 am

Line: 2

Original sentence:
手前の個室はふさがっていたので、その隣に入りました。

Splitting:
手前 の 個室 は ふさがって いた ので、その 隣 に 入りました。

Vocabulary:
手前 【てまえ】 (n) before, this side, we, you
個室 【こしつ】 (n) private room
塞がる 【ふさがる】 (v5r,vi) to be plugged up, to be shut up
居る 【いる】 (v1) (uk) (hum) to be (animate), to exist
ので (suf) that being the case, because of ...
その 【その】 (adj-pn) (uk) the, that
隣 【となり】 (n) next to, next door to
入る 【いる】 (v5r) to get in, to go in, to come in, to flow into, to set, to set in

Grammar Rules:
ふさがって いた it's the -te form of verb ふさがる, followed by the plain past form of verb いる. See external references for other informations.

Literally:
Since the private room of this side was shut up, I entered the neighboring one.

Translation:
Because the stall in front of me was occupied, I went into the one next to it.

Cultural Notes:

Other Notes:
手前 is used to express "before" or "in front" but, rather than just having just some generic definition like that, it might be best to throw some quick little examples out here, giving people hopefully a good idea of how things are actually used.

Examples:
新宿駅のひとつ手前で降りてください
Please get off one stop before Shinjuku train station.

トニーは日本語をマスターする一歩手前です。
Tony is within inches of mastering Japanese.

手前に引いてドアを開ける
Pull open the door


個室 private room. In this case something like stall would probably work best.
ふさがっていた. Although this means blocked, in this case it is not that the toilet is stopped up, but rather that someone is in the stall.

External References:
Verb form -te ita: http://www.timwerx.net/language/jpverbs/lesson60.htm
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RE: Trial Wrapup Idea

Postby Txkun » Sun 03.26.2006 4:55 am

Line: 3

Original sentence:
便器に腰を下ろそうとしたその時、隣から「やあ、元気?」と声がしたのです。

Splitting:
便器 に 腰 を 下ろそう と した その 時、隣 から「やあ、元気?」と 声 が した の です。

Vocabulary:
便器 【べんき】 (n) bedpan, chamber pot, urinal
腰 【こし】 (n) hip
下ろす 【おろす】 (v5s) to take down, to launch, to drop, to lower, to let (a person) off, to unload, to discharge
時 【とき】 (n-adv,n) time, hour, occasion
隣 【となり】 (n) next to, next door to
元気 【げんき】 (adj-na,n) health(y), robust, vigor, energy, vitality, vim, stamina, spirit, courage, pep
声 【こえ】 (n) voice
為る 【する】 (vs) (uk) to do, to try, to play, to practice, to cost, to serve as, to pass, to elapse

Grammar Rules:
下ろそうとする. It's the verb form used to express "to attempt to do something". Verb is おろす, volitional is おろそう, adding とする gives おろそうとする. Past tense is おろそうとした. See external references for more.
声がしたの. The ending particle の is used to give to the sentence an explanatory tone, see external references.

Literally:
At the time that I was attempting to lower my hips onto the toilet, from next door a voice did "Hey, are you healthy?"

Translation:
Just as I was about to sit on the toilet, I heard "Hey, you ok?" from next door.

Cultural Notes:

Other Notes:
腰をおろす is a phrase that means to sit, or to settle down. It doesn't have the conotation of squatting (しゃがむ)but it does have a slight nuance of relaxing when you sit.

External References:
To try to do something... http://www.guidetojapanese.org/try.html#part3
の particle usage: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/particles3.html#part5
Last edited by Txkun on Sun 03.26.2006 4:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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