yokkorasho

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Uwabami
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yokkorasho

Post by Uwabami » Sat 05.07.2005 3:05 pm

I have seen this word "yokkorasho" or "よっこらしょ" -
It seems to be a well known word. I got over 4000 hits when I pulled it up on Google, but I can't find a translation for it anywhere.
Can anyone help me with this?
Arigatou

Daisuke
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Daisuke » Sat 05.07.2005 3:09 pm

I think it means 'elaborating'.

I got it from a translator, so i don't know how correct it is.

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Mukade
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Mukade » Sun 05.08.2005 9:42 pm

Uwabami wrote:
I have seen this word "yokkorasho" or "よっこらしょ" -
It seems to be a well known word. I got over 4000 hits when I pulled it up on Google, but I can't find a translation for it anywhere.
Can anyone help me with this?
Arigatou
I've never heard this word before, and I've just scoured several dictionaries (including the koujien, the Japanese equivalent of the OED) and found nothing.

But as you say, a Google search will come up with quite a few hits. I browsed through several of the websites that came up on that search, and it seems like this word is a version of ようこそ.

If this is correct, then I would guess that it is either slang or regional dialect.

I'll ask around and see if anyone can shed some light on this for us.

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clay
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by clay » Sun 05.08.2005 9:49 pm

Yumi said よっこらしょ is similar to よいしょ (said when 'exerting' oneself.). I don't think I have ever heard よっこらしょ, although you are right it is all over Google. :) but it could very well be a variation of よいしょ and thus wouldn't be in kojien or any dictionary.

-- Found this:
RE:よいしょ 投稿者:mukaitak  投稿日: 6月 4日(火)15時53分21秒

「よいしょ」、「よいさ」のほかにも「どっこいしょ」、「よっこらしょ」、「よいこらしょ」などもありますね。いずれも力を入れる時の感嘆詞ですが当初は何か意味があったのでしょうかネ。
「えい」とか「やー」とか「はー」とかなら単純な感嘆詞で誰にでも特に意味もなく出てしまいそうな音ですが。

So it seems Yumi is right...

This is from a discussion here:
http://mukafish.hp.infoseek.co.jp/log-gogen3.htm
about the origins of よいしょ and many other topics (do a page search for よいしょ)
Last edited by clay on Sun 05.08.2005 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Mukade
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Mukade » Mon 05.09.2005 12:08 am

I spoke to a few co-workers here in the office, and what you've said seems correct, Clay.

よっこらしょ would seem to be some Tokyo-area dialect (not standard) for よいしょ.

The problem for me is - here in the Kansai area we use neither of these. In Kansai dialect, this is shortened even further to よし (and you don't pronounce the i part of shi).

You learn something everyday. :)

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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Gaijinian » Mon 05.09.2005 8:15 am

... It's odd, because I've heard this many times from my sensei, and
"Momo Tarou," if I remember correctly;)B)
The harder they come, the harder they fall, one and all.
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clay
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by clay » Mon 05.09.2005 9:12 am

I remember there was one sensei I worked with who whenever she got up from her chair or ever-so-slightly exerted herself would say よいしょ. :D

I wonder, is there a grammatical name for these types of words? It would be interesting to see a list.

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Mukade
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Mukade » Tue 05.10.2005 12:08 am

clay wrote:
I wonder, is there a grammatical name for these types of words? It would be interesting to see a list.
Wouldn't we just call these interjections?

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Ogawa
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Ogawa » Thu 05.12.2005 3:20 pm

The shortened form, "yoshi" would make sense in being something said after physical exertion. While playing super smash brothers melee for the nintendo gamecube I notice that when ever kirby turnes into a rock he says "yoshi!". I suppose this makes sense.


maybe this solves the problem:p
fear not death, it ends only your life. nothing else.

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Uwabami
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by Uwabami » Sun 05.22.2005 11:45 pm

Thx for the replies all
I was tryig to translate a song.
There were a lot of strange things like sweep sweep, brush brush pat pat and words in it that weren't in any dictionaries, but I think I have most of it translated now.
Shinobu's Diary of Daily Chores is the song I was working on.
That's where I found "yokkorasho".

netarou
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RE: yokkorasho

Post by netarou » Mon 05.23.2005 1:32 pm

when the middle-aged sit down and stand up, they often say どっこいしょ.
if you say どっこいしょ unconsciously, you already got middle-aged.
a: (椅子にかけつつ)あーどっこいしょっと。
b: うわ、オヤジくせー。

examples:
どっこいしょーっと綱を引く。
重たい荷物をどっこいしょーっと持ち上げる。
「うんとこどっこいしょぉ!」

alternate phrases:
どっこらしょ、どっこらせ、よっこいしょ、よっこらせ
どっこいせーのせっせっせ、よっこらせーのせっせっせ (childlike)

よいしょ is used commonly, not only by the middle-aged.

a: これ持ってってー。
b: はーい。よいしょ、こらしょ。

i found some translations for よいしょ.
よいしょ [間投詞] alley-oop // heave-ho
oops-a-daisy
upsy-daisy / upsidaisy

よいしょする has another meanings.
try using this online dictionary:
http://www.alc.co.jp/

i'm not good at english, so i hope you correct my mistakes.
Last edited by netarou on Mon 05.23.2005 1:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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