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Talking to little kids.

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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby Mukade » Wed 10.04.2006 11:30 am

Actually, I just refer to my daughter as 御姫様 and my son as ギャング. :|
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby clay » Wed 10.04.2006 12:02 pm

Ha, I've called my wife お姫様since we married. She doesn't like it too much when we are around other Japanese speakers though.

I will have to remember ギャング for when my son gets a little older... :D
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby Shibakoen » Wed 10.04.2006 3:13 pm

Mukade wrote:
Actually, I just refer to my daughter as 御姫様 and my son as ギャング. :|


Isn't that the name of the dog in Audition?
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby two_heads_talking » Wed 10.04.2006 3:15 pm

Oyaji wrote:
I wouldn't say "feminine" necessarily, because men do say it, but even men usually say it in a very gentle, friendly way, at least in my experience. Even when reproving, "boku" sounds much less harsh than "kimi" or "omae".


wow, that's the first time I have heard of the word me being used in a case as the word you.. very interesting. I don't think I ever heard that in my time in Japan, of course I will mention that I didn't teach in school and wasn't visiting schools on a regular basis, so...... very interesting nonetheless.
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby paul_b » Wed 10.04.2006 3:44 pm

two_heads_talking wrote:
wow, that's the first time I have heard of the word me being used in a case as the word you.

It isn't the only one.

己 【おのれ】 (int,n) oneself; (insulting) you; (P)
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby keatonatron » Wed 10.04.2006 11:41 pm

two_heads_talking wrote:
wow, that's the first time I have heard of the word me being used in a case as the word you..


Well, it didn't originally mean "me." Unlike 私 or 自分, 僕 orginally meant "servant," so it would have been used to refer to ones servants, and the servants would have used it to refer to themselves in front of their master. Kind of like the opposite of "mister" in English (which comes from "master"), now calling yourself 僕 (servant) implies that the other person is the master and elevates them honorifically.
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地域差、世代差

Postby coco » Thu 10.05.2006 1:30 am

I've never heard that before

Keatさん。

「ボク、どうしたの?」
「ボク、大丈夫?」
「ボク、ママはどこにいるの?」
「ボク、いくつ?」
子どもやお年寄りと日頃接している人は、このような言い方を使いますが、核家族で育った10-20代で子どもがいない場合には使わないと思います。子供のいない女性の場合、人称名詞を省くのが一般的だろうと思います。

「キミ、どうしたの?」という呼び掛けを使う女性もいますが、こちらは子供に接することに慣れていないという印象を受けます。

「ぼうや」という言い方もあります。これも子供に対して使う場合は女性語です
「坊や、お名前は?」
などと使います。この言葉も、すんなり使える人はある程度の年輩者か、そういう言葉遣いをする高齢者の身近にいる人がほとんどです。実際に、日頃耳にする機会は非常に稀です。

音楽関係者の間で「ぼうや(ボーヤ)」といえば、バンドなどの見習い兼付き人(使い走り-若者言葉でいえば「ツカイッパ」)のことを指します。

このように、世代と環境によって使う言葉はかなり違います。
地域差はもちろんですが、日常的に高齢者と触れ合う機会があるかどうかで選ぶ言葉が違ってきますので、女性言葉であってもOyajiさんが日頃耳にする言葉とkeatさんが耳にする言葉には差があると思われます。
一度、Oyajiさんの家にホームステイさせてもらったらいかがですか? なぁんてね ;)
Last edited by coco on Thu 10.05.2006 2:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby Oyaji » Thu 10.05.2006 3:20 am

Coco makes some excellent points. It is mostly older people, particularly women, who call little boys 「ぼく」, so it is used somewhat similar to something like "sweetie", except that it is only said to boys, and it is not that unusual for men to say it. I have heard younger people use it as well, but I assume they are used to being around children. It is usually only used if the person saying it doesn't know the child's name, though I have seen exceptions to that as well.

I clearly remember when I first heard it used. I was living in Tokyo, and had only been in Japan for a few months. I was walking down the street, when a little boy riding a bike was so busy staring at me that he crashed into a pole. He scratched his knees up pretty bad and started crying. I ran up to him, and the look in his eyes changed from surprise and pain into sheer terror, and the crying changed to wailing. A middle aged woman ran out of a nearby shop and ran over to us, giving me a look like "What are you doing to this poor child?" She bent over the little boy and said 「ぼく、大丈夫?」

Not only were they both looking at me like I was a mass murderer, but it sounded to me like this lady was calling herself 「ぼく」 and was asking "Am I alright?"

There was just so much wrong there that I went into shock, and silently walked away.



I often address my sons 「ぼうやたち」. :)
Last edited by Oyaji on Thu 10.05.2006 3:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby hungryhotei » Thu 10.05.2006 6:12 am

paul_b wrote:
two_heads_talking wrote:
wow, that's the first time I have heard of the word me being used in a case as the word you.

It isn't the only one.

己 【おのれ】 (int,n) oneself; (insulting) you; (P)


There are also 自分 and われ。

There is a good list of second person pronouns on wikipedia.
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E4%BA%8C%E4%BA%BA%E7%A7%B0
天気がいいから、散歩しましょう。
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 10.05.2006 9:19 am

keatonatron wrote:
two_heads_talking wrote:
wow, that's the first time I have heard of the word me being used in a case as the word you..


Well, it didn't originally mean "me." Unlike 私 or 自分, 僕 orginally meant "servant," so it would have been used to refer to ones servants, and the servants would have used it to refer to themselves in front of their master. Kind of like the opposite of "mister" in English (which comes from "master"), now calling yourself 僕 (servant) implies that the other person is the master and elevates them honorifically.


funny thing here, I knew the implication of boku, meaning servant etc.. I just never put the two meanings that you explain here and the fact it was used to mean "you" or to call the other person servant, of course in a school environment, I suppose it is perfectly ok for the sensei to refer to the student as a servant.. that makes much more sense that what i had originally thought.. thanks for the clarificiation.
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby two_heads_talking » Thu 10.05.2006 9:22 am

paul_b wrote:
two_heads_talking wrote:
wow, that's the first time I have heard of the word me being used in a case as the word you.

It isn't the only one.

己 【おのれ】 (int,n) oneself; (insulting) you; (P)


i have heard onore before. but never to address as oneself, I had heard it in a demeaning manner similar to teimei .. once a very honorable word, as i beleive onore was, but now only used when schathing someone.. hell, i didn't just learn one thing today, i learned a ton.. thanks :D
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby paul_b » Thu 10.05.2006 10:33 am

two_heads_talking wrote:
i have heard onore before. but never to address as oneself

Not surprising. I think that's archaic usage.
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RE: Talking to little kids.

Postby revolutionary » Tue 10.10.2006 11:11 pm

Wow. Thanks for all the thorough explaination. I've been kind of laid up with a kidney infection, so I hope I didn't come across as rude.
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