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College in Japan

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College in Japan

Postby EHammond » Thu 10.12.2006 12:57 am

I'm Looking to go To college in japan. Im From the US. I was wondering what options are avalible to me, good colleges, financial aid, houseing ect. I would like to go for a full term instead of exchange. The Degree i want is in Electronic and Infomation Engineering (Software Programing). Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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RE: College in Japan

Postby Harisenbon » Thu 10.12.2006 1:27 am

There have been so many threads about this. First, use the search button.

Then, just a couple of points.

If you want to go as an exchange student, there are a number of schools that have sister programs with colleges in Japan, as well as study abroad programs in Japan. 10 seconds on google with "study abroad Japan" should get you started.

If you are looking to get a JAPANESE DEGREE, and not do a standard study-abroad, you have to have VERY good Japanese (between 2級 and 1級) as well as pass the special college entrance test for foreigners. Each school also has a certain method of taking applications, so you would have to pick the school that you want to go to, and apply directly with them.
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RE: College in Japan

Postby keatonatron » Thu 10.12.2006 3:37 am

EHammond wrote:
I was wondering what options are avalible to me, good colleges, financial aid, houseing ect. I would like to go for a full term instead of exchange..


And if you don't go as an exchange, there is no financial aid available to you, which makes things very expensive very quickly. (probably around $180,000 for 4 years)

Plus, as I've said many times before, a degree from an American university is worth 10 times as much as one from a Japanese university, so I can't possibly understand why anyone would throw away that great opportunity and instead go to a Japanese university (unless they were studying to be a translator or something).

Cheap school and powerful diploma versus expensive school and worthless diploma. Doesn't seem like that hard of a choice.
Last edited by keatonatron on Thu 10.12.2006 3:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: College in Japan

Postby Harisenbon » Thu 10.12.2006 5:14 am

Cheap school and powerful diploma versus expensive school and worthless diploma.


I wouldn't go so far as to call it worthless. If you want to become a teacher in Japan (not ALT) I'm pretty sure a Japanese diploma would go further than a foreign one. But then, I'm a little protective, as I'm paying for my wife's college at current. ;)
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RE: College in Japan

Postby Mike Cash » Thu 10.12.2006 8:44 am

Harisenbon wrote:
Cheap school and powerful diploma versus expensive school and worthless diploma.


I wouldn't go so far as to call it worthless. If you want to become a teacher in Japan (not ALT) I'm pretty sure a Japanese diploma would go further than a foreign one. But then, I'm a little protective, as I'm paying for my wife's college at current. ;)


Have they changed the rule about teachers having to be Japanese citizens?
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RE: College in Japan

Postby Mukade » Thu 10.12.2006 10:32 am

I don't know that there were ever any rules - just institutionalized racism.

My co-worker just acquired his Japanese teaching license after attending Japanese university (he also has an American teaching license), but was turned down for full-time work because, word for word, "you aren't Japanese."

On the other hand, I have read recently about an American woman in Kobe (if I remember right) who became principle of her (public, if you can believe it) high school.

Both extremes seem to exist hand in hand here, unfortunately....
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RE: College in Japan

Postby keatonatron » Thu 10.12.2006 10:40 am

I guess I should have explained more. If you want to do work that relies heavily on Japanese culture and/or language, a Japanese school might be a good idea. But for a general degree (engineering, IT, etc.) it would be a real waste to go to Japan. Every person you show your diploma to would think two things:

1. Why did this person give up their chance to go to a top-notch American school to go to a Japanese one? Where they not smart enough to get in?

and

2. Did they actually understand anything they were being taught? If they misunderstood a few words in their structural integrity class, I don't want them building my airplanes.
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RE: College in Japan

Postby Harisenbon » Thu 10.12.2006 8:19 pm

keatonatron wrote:
Why did this person give up their chance to go to a top-notch American school to go to a Japanese one? Where they not smart enough to get in?


This is actually an issue with 帰国子女 that is recently coming to be understood. It used to be thought that 帰国子女 were amazingly bright, and the fact that they studied abroad was seen as this huge boon (still is to a large degree). However, what more and more people are realizing is that the reason some students go to High School abroad is because either a) they can't get into a good Japanese HS or b) they want to be able to get into college easier.

The college entrance exam for 帰国子女 is much easier than that for standard Japanese students, as they haven't been subject to the same 受験戦争 culture that other high school students have. For example, the 帰国子女 entrance test for 名城大学 is mainly based around english grammar and fluency. Although a rudamentary knowledge of math and science are still necessary, Japanese History, calculous, etc are all left off of the test.

And because you can go abroad for only a single year and still be considered a 帰国子女, I've started doubting the validity of anyone who says that they are a 帰国子女 until I hear them speak. I know more than a few that went abroad for a year, slept through their classes, can't speak english, and got into a good college just because they were 帰国子女.

Drives me nuts. ; )
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